Tag: history

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A Trip to the Bundeswehr’s Fantastic Defense Technology Museum in Koblenz, Part 8: Weird & Wonderful [GUEST POST]

The history of modern small arms is in part so fascinating because of how many firearms have been developed even in obscure circumstances, and how many of those obscure small arms still exist in museums and private collections around the world. Even though I make [Read More…]

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A Trip to the Bundeswehr’s Fantastic Defense Technology Museum in Koblenz, Part 7: Pistols [GUEST POST]

The history of modern small arms is in part so fascinating because of how many firearms have been developed even in obscure circumstances, and how many of those obscure small arms still exist in museums and private collections around the world. Even though I make [Read More…]

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A Trip to the Bundeswehr’s Fantastic Defense Technology Museum in Koblenz, Part 6: Assault Rifles [GUEST POST]

The history of modern small arms is in part so fascinating because of how many firearms have been developed even in obscure circumstances, and how many of those obscure small arms still exist in museums and private collections around the world. Even though I make [Read More…]

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A Trip to the Bundeswehr’s Fantastic Defense Technology Museum in Koblenz, Part 5: Submachine Guns, Cont’d 2 [GUEST POST]

The history of modern small arms is in part so fascinating because of how many firearms have been developed even in obscure circumstances, and how many of those obscure small arms still exist in museums and private collections around the world. Even though I make [Read More…]

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Book Review: Guns of the Special Forces 2001-2015

Guns of the Special Forces is a recent publication by Pen & Sword Press written by Leigh Neville, an Australian defense and military author. The book is inspired by Guns of the Elite written by George Markham, an in-depth look at the history and then current [Read More…]

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Stop Worrying About Whether Your Gun Is “Viable” – Accepting Obsolescence in Your Arsenal

As we ride the shockwaves outward from the epicenter of the explosion which began in 2004 with the expiry of the Assault Weapons Ban, our community of gun owners has rapidly mutated from the set that characterized our parents and grandparent’s generations. Many [Read More…]

20080404-211249-pic-476727724 DSCF0629 DSCF0600 Myself with Kyaw Aye at the Burmese Olympic Shooting Range in Dagon Township, just north of the capitol of Yangon. 14087541_932081226937098_1498438877_o

Modern Intermediate Full Power Calibers 019: The Russian 6x49mm Unified

What happens when you take the two concepts of a traditional, full-power rifle and machine gun round, and a small-caliber, high-velocity round, and smash them together? You get one of the most extreme military small arms calibers ever developed, and one of the last [Read More…]

The 7.92mm Kurzpatrone 43 (middle right) was developed from the larger 7.92mm German infantry cartridge, represented by the 154gr S Patrone (left) and 198gr sS Patrone (middle left). The 7.92x33 Kurz, as it's more commonly called today, is still used by some forces that retain the WWII-era Sturmgewehrs that fire it. The primary producer of ammunition for these weapons today is Prvi Partizan, which made the cartridge on the far right. On the right are two types of 7.62 NATO round, the M80 and M80A1, alongside two of its predecessors. Center left is the .30 T104 ball cartridge using the 1948 T1E1 case. Left is the .300 Savage, which was the starting point for what became the 7.62 NATO. The 4.85 British (center) was developed in the UK and competed in the NATO trials that eventually standardized on the Belgian 5.56mm SS109 load (left). Like the similar German 4.9x45mm DAG (right), it is based on the 5.56mm case. The 5.56mm alongside two of its .17 caliber variants. Center, the 4.32x45mm Frankford Arsenal, Right, the German 4.3x45mm DAG. Two .280/30 cartridges, and their immediate ancestors. The .280 concept was inspired by the German 7.92x33 Kurz caliber on the far left, but demands for standardization in testing with the US-developed .30 T65 cartridge (center left) resulted in rounds after 1949 using the same case head as that round. 0810162235bn l5vjyzz Tx5w8Jr .22 1895 US Army Experimental 0wQTJ3T

More on the Winchester-Burton Machine Rifle, from Forgotten Weapons

One of the early automatic rifles that has caught my interest for several years going now is the Winchester Machine Rifle, also known as the Burton Machine Rifle or the Light Machine Rifle. The Burton – as I’ll call it for the purposes of today’s post [Read More…]

GOvWgPM P1030632 M40 Tokarev IMG_0947 020_illo PHOTO_20160612_010947fixed M16_rifle_Firing_FM_23-9_Fig_2-7 1111151514badjusted The 1927 model Bang rifle, paradoxically uses the simpler and more advanced gas trap operating system! Capture ZmRw9Bz carbine1 PHOTO_20160514_221357