TFB Exclusive Review: Trijicon RMRcc for Concealed Carry Pistols

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    Earlier this morning we announced that the Trijicon RMRcc is now available to the public to fit all of the most popular concealed carry, full size, and optics ready pistols on the market. The want and desire by shooters for a dedicated micro red dot by a big-name manufacturer has been strong for a while now, and it is finally here! Yes, there are some already out there, but they are produced by foreign manufacturers, seem nearly unattainable to the average consumer, and are not rack-your-gun-on-a-door-frame-by-the-optic durable.

    We at TFB were lucky and fortunate enough to be invited by Trijicon to an exclusive shooting event to preview the Trijicon RMRcc before its public debut today. We spent two long, but fun days launching Federal Premium ammunition at paper and steel targets through a series of methodical drills taught by Scott “Jedi” Jedlinski of Modern Samurai Project. He, along with the good folks from Trijicon, got us up to speed on the numerous benefits of shooting a micro red dot when executed properly. We will relay that information to you here today along with everything that the Trijicon RMRcc is about. Let’s dive in!

    Specifications: Trijicon RMRcc

    At first glance, the Trijicon RMRcc does not appear vastly different than its original predecessor in the RMR, but like with many things, the important difference is in the little details. The length (front to back) is the exact same when comparing the RMRcc to the RMR. Some of the key differences are the height, width, screw hole placement (for plates and being able to adapt to different firearms), and the placement of the window or lens. The complete specification listing for the Trijicon RMRcc can be read below:

    • Magnification: 1x
    • Sight Window: 0.76″ x 0.56″ (19mm x 14mm)
    • Lens: Tempered Glass
    • Adjustments: 1 Tick = 3 M.O.A. (Minute of Angle)
    • Adjustment Range (Elevation & Windage): 150 M.O.A. of Travel
    • Dimensions (L x W x H): 1.8″ x 0.9″ x 0.9″ (46mm x 23mm x 23mm)
    • Weight: 1 Oz. w/ Battery (28.34g)
    • Illumination Source: LED Powered by CR2032 Battery
    • Battery Life: Over 4 Years of Continuous Use (when used at 70°F or 21°C at Setting 4 of 8)
    • Brightness Settings: Automatic & 8 Adjustable Setting
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    Comparison: Trijicon RMRcc (LEFT) vs. Trijicon RMR (RIGHT)

    The current MSRP of the Trijicon RMRcc is benchmarked at $699 which is the same going rate as the RMR. Also, the warranty is the same as well. The electronics are warranted to be free of defects in material and workmanship during normal use for a period of five (5) years from the date of original manufacture.

    first impressions: Trijicon rmrcc

    Having the ability to see a Trijicon RMRcc versus the original RMR side-by-side gives you a good perspective of how meaningful the small differences are. We already know the length (front to back) is identical. This measurement, in a sense, is inconsequential to the shooter. Our slides have a lot of real estate to accommodate the length. The height; however, is 0.1″ shorter. When you view the RMRcc it does not appear any shorter when mounted on a firearm. This mental illusion could be attributed to the glass lens being positioned higher within the window (look at the photo above again).

    The next noticeable difference is the width being tightened up by 0.2″ and that altering the placement of the battery and the RMRcc screw hole pattern. By narrowing the footprint of the RMRcc that much it forced Trijicon to change the positioning of the circuitry to run it; thus, the battery storage position had to be moved. This in turn affected where the screw holes would be. Some consumers will incorrectly want to believe Trijicon changed the screw hole pattern from the RMR to the RMRcc just to be unique, and that is flatly wrong. In order to achieve their overall desired size, it was required to make these necessary changes.

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    Some other immediately noticeable traits to the Trijicon RMRcc are its rugged housing, compatibility with suppressor height sights, and its waterproof capabilities down to 66 feet (20 meters). These are all highly desirable characteristics carried over from the original RMR along with a multitude of other elements you would come to expect from a Trijicon product like windage and elevation dials that can be adjusted with the rim of a piece of ammunition, snag-free design, a common CR2032 battery, and 4-year battery life.

    Mounting: Trijicon RMRcc

    One of the first questions you might have when discussing any new micro red dot is: what will it fit? Well, as evident in the list below, the Trijicon RMRcc right out of the gate fits a multitude of the most popular concealed carry pistols on the market through either direct adaptation to the firearm (if it is an optics ready model) or through the simple addition of a mounting plate available from Trijicon.

    • Smith & Wesson: M&P Shield M2.0, M&P Shield M2.0 CORE, M&P 380 Shield EZ, M&P 9mm Shield EZ, M&P Bodyguard 380
    • Glock: G19, G17, G22, G24, G32, G42, G43, G43X, G45, G48, etc | All MOS Guns
    • Walther: PPS
    • Kimber: 1911 and Ultra Carry, Micro 9
    • Springfield Armory: All XDS Models, Hellcat (Iron Sight Model), Hellcat OSP
    • SIG Sauer: P365, P365XL, P938

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    For people who want to get their firearms sent off to be custom milled for a micro red dot like the Trijicon RMRcc, a 1911 pistol is a great match for this new optic as well. The RMRcc is a near-perfect match in regards to slide width; whereas, competing optics will overhang the edge of the slide and be cumbersome to more appropriately match with a holster.

    To install the Trijicon RMRcc to any of the aforementioned firearms, you either directly mount the micro red dot (if it is an optics ready model) or you can drift out your rear sight by the means of a brass punch or sight press tool, and then install your necessary dovetail mount plate available from Trijicon. No additional gunsmithing is necessary unless you want to invest a firearm you own whole hog that is not on the above list and have it custom milled for a Trijicon RMRcc. If that is your end game, you can contact Trijicon Customer Service and they can relay the exacting dimensions to your gunsmith of choice.

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    Range time: Trijicon rmrcc

    Normally, when I am presented with an opportunity to review something, I am left to my own devices and tomfoolery. With the exclusive shooting event Trijicon hosted, that was not possible to my benefit. Trijicon brought in Scott “Jedi” Jedlinski of Modern Samurai Project to impart us with all kinds of knowledge bombs and nuggets of valuable information to take home with us. One of them is how we should better present a handgun with a red dot, or more simply, how to extend and point our handgun most effectively. He taught us that we should be “dropping” the red dot onto our target. Regardless where your gun is coming from – hip holster, low ready, shoulder rig, appendix inside-the-waistband, etc –  you want to tip your barrel down onto the target you are engaging. Why?… Where is the moral of the story here?… If you do this, you always know where your red dot is coming from. This tweak in technique from Jedi is valuable for 2 great reasons.

    1. There is No More “Red Dot Panic” – When you point out your handgun you always know where your dot is coming from every… single… time. It is predictable and repeatable. A standard press out from your chest can place your red dot in the window (and outside the window) in different places every time.
    2. Window Size Matters Less – When you already know where your red dot is before you can even see it, your confidence increases, you can game how fast or slow you move with intention, and having a huge window does not matter.

    To speak further to the second point above, everyone in attendance of the Trijicon shooting event had this lightbulb, AH-HA! moment where we realized we were shooting as fast (if not faster now with better tutelage) with the Trijicon RMRcc and its smaller size than any previously larger red dot we have had experience with before. Moreover, our accuracy remained on point.

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    Once we had our mindset and accuracy pegged down due to Jedi‘s guidance we got into some of that good ol’ tomfoolery I would have eventually improvised by myself. Trijicon drug out thick wooden poles for every shooter in attendance at the range. All of us shooters stared blankly at each other in an attempt to read each other’s thoughts: “Are we about to shoot around poles or do dynamic movement drills?”

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    To our surprise and childish delight we were informed that now we were going to run a durability test by racking our RMRcc against our wooden posts not gingerly, but VIOLENTLY in an attempt to break them. This is one of those moments where you do not need to be told twice and the first person to break theirs theoretically wins. This drill of aggression intermixed with sparing rounds sent downrange lasted for 10 – 15 minutes and roughly a dozen shooters failed to damage any of the Trijicon RMRcc dots on the range, and none of us witnessed a deviation in our zeroes.

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    After 2 full days of shooting in some scorching heat of 105°F in Texas, shooting our Trijicon RMRcc red dots across a dozen different makes and models, deploying them from holstered positions, and shooting at distances of 3 – 50 yards, we finally decided to pack it up… but not before trying to hit steel at 100 yards because why not? For this comical exercise in what seemed like futility, I chose a Glock 19 Gen5 9mm with an RMRcc (trying to make my mentor James Reeves proud with that selection). Out of a standard 15-round magazine, I rang the 100-yard steel silhouette 5 out of 15 tries to my surprise. Shooting 33% at 100 yards is not too shabby with a little RMRcc.

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    final thoughts: Trijicon rmrcc

    So, what are some of my final thoughts?… All in all, the Trijicon RMRcc is authentically a great product. It is durable as heck, the dot is crisp in the window, it maintains a zero no matter how much you abuse it, and its smaller dimensions and footprint had no hindrance on my accuracy or ability to find it when presenting my firearm.

    Negatives?… None genuinely come to mind except maybe the price. Would I love to get an RMRcc for like $150? You bet! Is that Trijicon tier of quality feasible at such a low price-point? No, that is simply not reasonable or reality. Quality comes at a cost. There is no other red dot on the market you could convince me to violently bludgeon against a pole for 15 minutes and then carry it as my primary carry piece like my life depends on the functioning of that dot. I already own an RMR for that reason, and I would pony up yet again for an RMRcc at $699 MSRP to have that peace of mind and reliability in hand. If you have a small carry gun and want a micro red dot, this is it. Get an RMRcc.

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    In closing, I want to say thank you to Trijicon for allowing TFB and myself the opportunity to try out the Trijicon RMRcc prior to the release date. Also, many thanks to  Scott “Jedi” Jedlinski of Modern Samurai Project for his tutelage and instruction at the Trijicon event for not only imparting some valuable knowledge on how to maximize the usage of a red dot, but also tinkering with and improving some of my bad, personal shooting habits. Finally, thank you to Federal Premium for providing Trijicon with quality ammunition for the Trijicon shooting event. That is always greatly appreciated.

    Also, we would like to know what all of you guys and gals think? Do you believe that the Trijicon RMRcc is something worth spending your money on? Would you add it to your everyday carry pistol or home defense firearm? Shoot a league with it? Let us know all of your thoughts in the Comments below! We always appreciate your feedback.

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