Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc. Reintroduces the Marlin 1894 Lever-Action Rifle

Matthew Moss
by Matthew Moss
Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc. Reintroduces the Marlin 1894 Lever-Action Rifle

The Marlin 1894 returns! Ruger have reintroduced the classic Marlin 1894. Chambered in .44 Rem Mag, the new 1894 Classic sports a beautifully-finished American black walnut straight stock and forend. The rifle is made from alloy steel and has a 20 inch cold hammer-forged barrel. The rifle’s tubular magazine that will hold 10 rounds of .44 Magnum ammunition, or 11 rounds of .44 Special.

Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc. Reintroduces the Marlin 1894 Lever-Action Rifle

Ruger say the Marlin 1894 is now shipping but with limited availability. To alleviate any concerns about the new now Ruger-made 1894s, Ruger have stressed that “improved manufacturing processes create tight tolerances, resulting in a reliable, attractive rifle. Multi-layered quality control procedures, including daily function and accuracy audits and multiple inspections, result in a high-quality product.”

Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc. Reintroduces the Marlin 1894 Lever-Action Rifle

Here’s what Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc. have to say about the new Marlin 1894:

Sturm, Ruger & Company, Inc. (NYSE: RGR) is proud to announce the reintroduction of the Marlin® Model 1894™ Classic chambered in .44 Rem Mag. The Model 1894 Classic retains the traditional characteristics that made this a truly iconic rifle.

“We’re very excited to introduce our first Ruger-made Marlin Model 1894,” said Ruger President and CEO, Chris Killoy. “We have spent many months working to make this rifle the best it can be.”

Chambered in .44 Magnum, the Model 1894 Classic sports a beautifully finished American black walnut straight stock and forend. The clean and crisp checkering accentuates both the aesthetics and utility of this carefully crafted rifle.

Richly blued and featuring a square finger lever, this alloy steel rifle is equipped with a 20” cold hammer-forged barrel with standard six-groove rifling and a 1:20” twist rate. Also capable of shooting the lighter-recoiling .44 Special, the Model 1894 is equipped with a tubular magazine that will accept 10 rounds of .44 Magnum ammunition, or 11 rounds of .44 Special.

“Our focus continues to be on quality,” continued Killoy. “We remain committed to making firearms worthy of John Marlin’s legacy. The fit and finish of this rifle is reminiscent of what was produced by Marlin craftsmen in New Haven, CT many decades ago.”

The Ruger-made 1894 Classic is marked “Mayodan, NC,” bears a “RM” or Ruger-made serial number prefix, and features the red and white “bullseye” in the stock.

Additional models in different calibers and configurations will be released throughout the coming year. Due to the anticipated strong demand and the limited quantity of Ruger-made Marlin lever-action rifles, Ruger encourages retailers to contact their distributors for availability and advises consumers not to leave deposits with retailers that do not have confirmed shipments.

To stay up-to-date on future Marlin announcements and learn more about the Marlin Model 1894 Classic, visit MarlinFirearms.com, Facebook.com/MarlinFirearms or Instagram.com/MarlinFirearmsOfficial.

The acquisition, ownership, possession and use of firearms is heavily regulated. Some models may not be legally available in your state or locale. Whatever your purpose for lawfully acquiring a firearm – know the law, get trained and shoot safely.

Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc. Reintroduces the Marlin 1894 Lever-Action Rifle

Find out more at www.marlinfirearms.com.

Matthew Moss
Matthew Moss

Managing Editor: TheFirearmBlog.com & Overt Defense.com. Matt is a British historian specialising in small arms development and military history. He has written several books and for a variety of publications in both the US and UK. Matt is also runs The Armourer's Bench, a video series on historically significant small arms. Here on TFB he covers product and current military small arms news. Reach Matt at: matt@thefirearmblog.com

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