Trijicon Fires Back Re: Lawsuit Settlement with Holosun

    Trijicon has issued their own statement about the settled patent infringement lawsuit against Holosun.

    Trijicon has issued their own statement about the settled patent infringement lawsuit against Holosun.

    If you’re a regular TFB reader, you will likely already be aware of the lawsuit that Trijicon filed against Holosun earlier this year. In short, the lawsuit alleged that Holosun infringed on Trijicon’s “Optical Sight” patent, #US8443541B2. You will likely also know that the suit has already been settled and that Holosun recently released a statement about it. This statement was exceedingly brief and general, and mentioned that “…terms of the settlement were not disclosed.” Now with a September 8th press release, copied below, Trijicon has issued their own decidedly brief statement on the matter. There is one interesting point in it that seems to color the resolution with a markedly different perspective.

    The RMR is the OG pistol red dot, and one of the two optics that was specified in the lawsuit.

    The RMR is the OG pistol red dot, and one of the two optics that was specified in the lawsuit.

     

    Trijicon Inc. and Holosun Technologies Inc. Reach Agreement on Patent Infringement Case

    Wixom, MI – September 8, 2020 – The recent filing with the U.S. International Trade Commission by Trijicon, Inc., against Holosun Technologies, Inc., on reflex optic designs has been settled. Trijicon successfully defended its intellectual property around reflex sight features and technology.

    “We invest heavily in research, development, and testing at Trijicon to ensure our optics are ready to perform for the most demanding users, and we are committed to defending that investment in innovation,” said Stephen Bindon, Trijicon President & CEO.

    Terms of the settlement were not disclosed.

    The other of the two optics named was the newer SRO.

    The other of the two optics named was the newer SRO.

    Did you also note the line? Although once again the details are kept shrouded, the inclusion of the “successfully defended its intellectual property” language is cause for some eyebrow raising. Of course, given the non-disclosure, unfortunately, we are left to wonder what this means. At least for now, there don’t appear to be any drastic, immediate effects on the pistol optics market. You can still purchase Holosun red dots just as you could before (at least at the time of this writing). So whatever this “successful defense” Trijicon claims they mounted may have looked like behind closed doors, it hasn’t inhibited Holosun’s existing product offerings. Could it ultimately alter their path in the future, changing the way their future optics are designed and built? Possibly, but we may never know the details for sure. Only time will tell how these two competitors fare against one another in the future. Hopefully, no matter what shape that battle takes, it will end up causing ever better products to be developed and offered to us, as the shooting consumers. See you at the range!


    Photos courtesy of Trijicon.
    Will P

    Former US Army infantryman, lifelong hunter and hobby/sport shooter. Perpetual firearms student, always seeking to become better and learn more. Interested in all shooting disciplines and passionate about all kinds of guns. Contact on Instagram: @WillTFB


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