[Indo Defense 2018] Vietnamese Small Arms Part Two: Grenade Launcher’s, Galil ACE’s, and OSV-96’s

    In our previous coverage of modern Vietnamese small arms development on display at Indo Defense 2018 we spent some time looking at locally produced M79’s, Lee Enfield No.4’s, a rotary grenade launcher, and even a 9x19mm Bizon! In this post we’ll be looking at some of the other developments that we weren’t able to fit in the first one.

    One point to mention here is that many of the VDI guns had early production serial numbers, even to the point of multiple firearms with “00001” stamped on them. Maybe the firearms on display were one-offs intended for the show, but one certainly wonders what the VDI officials had in mind when it comes to their serialization systems.

    Our first VDI product is the UBGL that would appear to be a mix between the chambering/handguards of an M203, the trigger system of a GP30, and the pivoting barrel that is starting to become more common on many UBGL and standalone launchers these days.

    -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    Tube release latch is a knurled button just above the handguard -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    Note the short Picatinny rail where a laser designator or similar device could be positioned. Because the launcher pivots to the left, the mounting of such a device wouldn’t get in the way of reloading a grenade -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    Safety is a crossbolt design just below the trigger, in the trigger guard -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    Galil ACE manufacture began in Vietnam several years ago and we are starting to see more of the Vietnamese Army being armed with IWI Defense-based products, in addition to variants of the Tavor as well. VDI produces the GK and STK series of 7.62x39mm rifles and carbines, which are all Galil ACE-patterned/licensed models. Note that while the ACE intentionally has the charging handle on the left side of the receiver to facilitate more recent manipulation methods, the Vietnamese variant retains the position of the charging handle on the right side of the rifles.

    -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    The stock is folded or unfolded by way of pressing down on the latch at the rear of the receiver trunnion -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    Possibly the oldest design that VDI has reproduced are the Tokarev-patterned handguns that were on display. One variant has a shorter pistol grip and magazine capacity (8 rounds) and is VDI designated “SN7M”, while the other has a longer pistol grip and higher capacity (13 rounds) and is called the “SN7TD”.

    The VDI Makarov clone is called the SN9 -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    We first caught wind of the KSVK being produced in Vietnam in January of this year, where it will be joining several anti-materiel rifles already in service with the Vietnamese Army such as the OSV-96 variant as well. VDI has designated the locally produced KSVK as the “SBT12M1” Sniper Rifle in technical phamphlets.

    -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    The KSVK is a manually operated, magazine-fed design -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    -Miles V, Indo Defense 2018

    Miles

    Infantry Marine, based in the Midwest. Specifically interested in small arms history, development, and usage within the MENA region and Central Asia. To that end, I run Silah Report, a website dedicated to analyzing small arms history and news out of MENA and Central Asia.

    Please feel free to get in touch with me about something I can add to a post, an error I’ve made, or if you just want to talk guns. I can be reached at [email protected]


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