Its About Time – Binocular Spotting Scope from Swarovksi

With 10x binoculars able to take care of most spotting work at the 100 yard line, I constantly found myself questioning why higher magnification spotting scopes have not kept the two-eyes open option. While yes, I understand that under previous thought it may have taken two separate and well-aligned tubes to get an excellent image, along has come Swarovski to shatter the paradigm.

Swarovski has announced their latest spotting scope, the BTX Binocular Spotting Scope that indeed solves my particular complaint – yet raises a new one (more on that later). The BTX still uses a single tube, but through the clever use of mirrors and lenses is able to create binocular style viewing piece. Swarovski that the by using two eyes, hunters have a larger field of vision and better detail with subsequently less strain and fatigue.

Just in case one does get fatigued, the new BTX includes an headrest and aiming aid above the right eyepiece (a nifty feature that I contend should be replicated on all spotting scopes). The BTX is available with either 30x or 35x fixed magnification and is compatible with all the various ATX/STX modules and accessories.

With the base ATX 25-60x option clocking in at a whopping $3,775 retail, my new complaint pops up – pricing. I am confident the BTX will not be anywhere near “reasonable” for those of us working folks.

Nuts.

(B&H have the BTX eyepiece available for $2,689 – that is just the eyepiece).





Nathan S.

One of TFB’s resident Jarheads, Nathan now works within the firearms industry. A consecutive Marine rifle and pistol expert, he enjoys local 3-gun, NFA, gunsmithing, MSR’s, & high-speed gear. Nathan has traveled to over 30 countries working with US DoD & foreign MoDs.

Nathan can be reached at Nathan.S@TheFirearmBlog.com

The above post is my opinion and does not reflect the views of any company or organization.


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  • Anonymoose

    Why has this never been a thing until now?

    • EdgyTrumpet

      Negatives overshadowing the positives is my guess.

      • iksnilol

        I say the same thing about binoculars in general. Too few good monoculars on the market :/

  • MrBrassporkchop

    They have binocular attachments for telescopes. The telescope crowd loves then but it drives the price up since it’s easy to mess up.

    If you can live without the 45 degree eyepiece you can get some high powered astronomy binoculars and a tripod setup for under 300 bucks. celestron has zoom models that can go up to 100x.

    • FarmerB

      Sure – but magnification doesn’t mean you can see anything. Just saying, if people buy this thinking 100x cheapo binoculars are going to be better than 60x Swarovski.

  • Mike N.

    To be honest, $3,800 is not unreasonable for something like that from a high-end brand, it does have twice the amount of optics for the eyepiece, not to mention the image splitter bits. In comparison Hensoldt Spotter 60 (Euro) is more, and the fairly common high-end Kowa’s (Japanese) with fluorite elements and an eyepiece are not much less.

  • john huscio

    So how does it detect binoculars? Glint off lenses? 😉

  • DetroitMan

    Nice product. It will be interesting to see how it does on the market. My guess is that it will appeal mainly to high end competition shooters.

    There are some very practical reasons that spotting scopes have remained monocular. One is simply bulk. That complex mirror system they put on the back basically adds a second spotting scope to the package. It also looks like it would be very awkward to use unmounted, whereas a traditional spotting scope can be used like a spyglass.

    The other reason is that spotting scopes are designed to be usable by a shooter in field positions. With the right mount and positioning, a shooter can easily shift between the rifle sights and the spotting scope while in the prone or sitting positions. This scope looks like it would be awkward for that as well.

  • Phidippus

    Everybody here always complains about the pricing of expensive guns and accessories.

    There is always a market for quality. This stuff sells. And sells well.

  • FarmerB

    I run an ATX with 95mm (4″) objective (ATX 30-70×95) – it’s an awesome scope. The only real issue is being able to transport it – a easily portable hard case would be most welcome. This BTX looks even more clumsy to deal with (although I’d love an aiming piece).