Ruger Gunsite Scout Rifle in 450 Bushmaster

Ruger 450 rifle

Sturm, Ruger & Co. announced a caliber addition to the Gunsite Scout Rifle series: the 450 Bushmaster. This is the second 450 Bushmaster rifle the company has introduced in the past few months. The previous announcement covered a new Ruger American Rifle in the caliber.

The new gun follows the same styling and functional details as the existing Gunsite Scout rifles. Among its features:

  • stock – The new rifle uses a stock made of American walnut. It has checkering in the grip and fore end areas. A soft rubber pad at the back of the stock helps to absorb recoil. Ruger includes three 1/2″ spacers with the pad to allow the shooter to adjust the length of pull
  • barrel – Ruger uses a 16.1″ cold hammer forged barrel that is free floated. The barrel is threaded (11/16″-24) and comes equipped with a Ruger Precision Rifle Hybrid Muzzle Brake. According to the company, this brake offers recoil reduction while keeping the blast to either side at a minimum.
  • sights – One of the obvious scout rifle features is the forward placement of a scope. This gun does not ship with glass, but it does have a Picatinny rail for adding one that is mounted forward of the receiver. Additionally, the gun ships with iron sights: adjustable rear and a protected front.

These guns are shipping now and carry a MSRP of $1,199.



Richard Johnson

An advocate of gun proliferation zones, Richard is a long time shooter, former cop and internet entrepreneur. Among the many places he calls home is http://www.gunsholstersandgear.com/.


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  • RavishedBoy

    Niiiiice looking gun, really. But bolt actions are for long-range shooting, for short-range shooting (especially with dangerous game) using pistol calibers (.44 mag, .460 S&W, …) semiautos are a better option (IMHO).

    • Dr. Longfellow Buchenrad

      Speaking of more standard scout rifles (specifically ones in .308) the main reason for bolt action was to save weight (its also theoretically more reliable, but there are semis that are reliable enough that that is a non-issue). There really arent many sub 9lb battle rifles (and none at the time that Cooper outlined the Scout Rifle concept) and his target weight (including optic, sling, ammo, and everything else) was 7lb.

      Though for this article we are dealing with .450 Bushmaster which is short enough to fit in an AR15 which can be put into a package much lighter than 9lb (though probably still around 8.5-9lb when you add optic, full mag, and other doohickeys, but 7lb is not exactly an easy target for bolt guns either)

      I will also grant that Ruger could have done better shaving weight off their scout series (this specific rifle is 6.6lb unloaded; only 1lb lighter than a RRA .458 SOCOM *I couldnt find any complete weights for a 450 Bushmaster) and with all that granted, I dont see much of an advantage of this specific rifle over a .450 Bushmaster (or my preferred flavor .458 SOCOM) AR15.

      • NoDakNative

        “I will also grant that Ruger could have done better shaving weight off their scout series (this specific rifle is 6.6lb unloaded; only 1lb lighter than a RRA .458 SOCOM *I couldnt find any complete weights for a 450 Bushmaster) and with all that granted, I dont see much of an advantage of this specific rifle over a .450 Bushmaster (or my preferred flavor .458 SOCOM) AR15.”

        Well the .450 Bushmaster has a max pressure of 40,000 PSI while the Ruger action will take 60,000 PSI cartridges. I foresee the development of “Ruger Only” .450 Bushmaster loads by reloaders and perhaps by companies like Buffalo Bore.

        • Dr. Longfellow Buchenrad

          I would have no problem with that; as long as its not blowing primers and the like.

    • PersonCommenting

      The problem is that they cant have semi autos in africa so that is one reason. Also a rifle is going to be more conducive to a quick stop for a guide gun role.

      • Ryobiwankenobi

        I believe that PA still bans the use of semi-autos for deer hunting. My state has no such restriction thankfully.

        • Anonymoose

          Nope they changed that this year.

        • PersonCommenting

          Yeah, also a rifle is just going to be easier to get on target quickly. You raise it up and you have time for one shot. It doesnt matter if it is semi auto or not.

  • Spencerhut

    Good choice on the .450 Bushmaster with normal / common .451 sized bullets and case head. The other cartridge people seem to consider next to the .450 Bushmaster is the .458 SOCOM with it’s oddball bullet size that really limits your options if you reload. I’ll take commonality over a minor sliver in performance gain any day. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/b22edbb21ed3b5b6fcf1ebf5e7cd73b7d343ce0b8ba8db8422156f7e21f0cdf1.jpg

    • Dr. Longfellow Buchenrad

      I would argue the opposite. .458 is used for rifle rounds like .45-70, .450 Marlin, and 458 Win Mag which are all great reloading cartridges with nice available selection of bullets. .451/.452 is used in .45 pistol ammo like .45 ACP, .45 Colt, and .454 Casull and the bullets in that size are mostly designed for pistol velocities and ranges.

      But for all intents and purposes external (but not necessarily terminal) performance is identical between .450 Bushmaster and .458 SOCOM. External performance will vary more between different loads of the same cartridge than it will between the average performance of either cartridge. Terminal Performance will vary more by the specific bullet used in either cartridge.

      • Giolli Joker

        I actually agree with you and I believe .458 has much more flexibility with subsonic loads in the 500+ grs range, however you forgot the bullets developed for .460 S&W. Those would work well at .450 velocities.

        • Anonymoose

          I’d like a Gunsite Scout in .45 Raptor. You’d get more mag capacity and it would still fit in the standard short-action. I’d also like a .358 Winchester or .338 Federal option.

          • Joe

            Can I get a DPMS Gen II chambered in 45 Raptor while we’re at it?
            And factory ammo, please.
            I’m after a 20 round magazine full of super-heavy 45 caliber projectiles.

    • Ryobiwankenobi

      If you reload you do have the option to size .458 bullets to .451. Keep in mind that the twist rate for this cartridge may not stabilize anything much over 300gr.

      • tazman66gt

        That’s why Wilson Combat offers 2 twist rates for their .458 SOCOM barrels and rifles.

    • Mark Horning

      The advantage of the SOCOM is the .458 bullets.

      It’s true that there are lots of .451 bullets out there, they are almost invariably of light construction for pistol use. While .458 bullets are not nearly as common, they are designed for rifle velocities.

      • Captain Obvious

        Reloaders are using .45 cal muzzle loading bullets that come in sabots.

  • Keiichi

    Neat. I love my .308 RGSR. Glad to see new caliber offerings.

  • Ryobiwankenobi

    This rifle should prove very useful to deer hunters in Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, and other areas that allow the use of rifles in straight- wall and/or pistol calibers in previously “shotgun only” areas. 450 Bushmaster achieves these requirements while probably requiring the least amount of work to adapt for production. With 45-70 type power and trajectory it should prove to have a longer effective range on big Midwestern deer over shotgun slugs.

    • Anonymoose

      Can’t use it in Ohio. We have a list of approved cartridges, and they’re all either handgun cartridges or old-timey things like .38-55, .45-70, .50-110.

      • PersonCommenting

        What is there reasoning behind straight wall cartridges only? Got to be the dumbest thing ever. .

        • The stated reason is to limit the range of any bullets that miss their target in hunting areas that tend to be much smaller than in less heavily settled states; straight walled cartridges require big, heavy, broad bullets with rainbowlike ballistic arcs, which means that a drunken idiot in blaze orange is less likely to bag a backpacker if he misses the deer-colored lump of scrub brush he was “aiming” at.

          • Jim_Macklin

            Illinois, last I checked doesn’t allow ANY rifle for deer, shotgun slugs or buckshot. I think some handguns are allowed.
            But the improved accuracy should made a rifle safer with fewer misses. A 12 gauge slug can fly a mile.

          • PersonCommenting

            It is an anti gun anti hunting law or most likely plane ignorance on the legislatures.. I have been to ohio and the forests there are huge. There might be small pockets of huntable public area that are close to peoples houses. All the same the law isnt made for them it is made because law makers want to limit who can do it. The guns they ahve allowed arent all that common, nor is the ammo, also expensive. I guess 357 mag isnt terribly out of sight but still. If it isnt intentionally anti hunting then it is based on ignorance which is what I would expect.

          • PersonCommenting

            Silliness. Ohio is huge though. Just punishes good hunters. Jackwagons with straight wall cartridges in the hands of an idiot will do the same as a rifle.

          • Giolli Joker

            On the other hand, a good hunter is a good hunter even with a straight walled cartridge.
            And a good hunter should get closer to his/her prey to ensure a humane kill, rather than relying on the rifle ballistics and shooting skills.

          • PersonCommenting

            I agree with that but I can still accomplish these goals with a modern 308 bolt action with special loads that wont over penetrate or endanger the public.

          • Giolli Joker

            Sure, but that would be something that could be hardly translated into law, subject to interpretation and misunderstandings, both for the hunters and the people in charge to verify that the law is followed.

          • PersonCommenting

            Youre right but it doesnt need to. People would do it anyways because they dont want to shoot other people.

          • PersonCommenting

            Its like this, I have a car that has 200 on the dash. I have never ever driven faster than 85, why because I know it would be unsafe to do because the roads arent made for it and it would endanger others. The government doesn’t ban that car because of what it can do. Why should they ban a class of gun because of what it can do?

          • Giolli Joker

            If I understand correctly that class of guns is not banned, only not to be used for hunting.
            Regarding the car example: you are responsible, others aren’t, for those there are radars and fines.
            How can authorities verify if your load is approved or not? With a random check they can easily tell a straight walled cartridge from a necked one, surely they can’t tell how many fps your .308 will average (bring a chrono and ask to shoot a round? feasible, but expensive and unlikely).
            Anyway, I’m not here to argue or to justify that regulation, just putting down thoughts. 😉

          • PersonCommenting

            I get ya and I love arguing, I honestly am wrong a lot and forums like this help me. At the same time I I think if people do have loads that they shouldnt be using then are still not likely to hurt anyone. At least no more than a straight wall would. That is my opinion on it. Also while unlikely the under educated would buy it there are plenty of offerings of straight wall cartridges like buffalo bore that can reach out there or over penetrate and do some damage in the wrong hands.

          • uncle fester

            The size of the state doesn’t impact the amount of congestion in hunting areas. The purpose of rules like this one is to keep people safe(r) while making more area available to rifle hunting.

            Personally, I would love to find a .308 round that self destructed at 150 yards. It would allow me .308 accuracy without the “extra” range I don’t need or want.

          • PersonCommenting

            Okay, I guess I was looking at it wrong at with the size. All the same I think the point is still the same. If you know what youre shooting at and what is behind it then there still shouldnt be an issue.

          • mcjagermech

            a 308 round that deploys a mini parachute or something to add more drag and reduce range

          • Giolli Joker

            Tubular bullets (cookie cutter style), they are already used in aircraft mounted guns as limited range target practice rounds.
            When velocity drops under a certain threshold (I suppose related to specific Ma and Re numbers), they behave aerodynamically as flat points, slowing down rather quickly.

          • mcjagermech

            that’s much more simple

          • iksnilol

            A 308 round filled with rotation armed high explosives?

          • MeaCulpa

            That was a BEAUTIFUL description!

        • Anonymoose

          To screw with people who want to hunt with common weapons.

      • car54

        Actually the 450 BM is legal in Ohio now. It was just added to approved cartridges.

        • Anonymoose

          I’m looking at the approved list right now, and I see .450 Marlin, not .450 Bushmaster. You can get an AR10 in .450 Marlin if you want to spend a lot of money, but otherwise you’re pretty much stuck with Winchester 94s, BLRs, or used Marlins.

          • car54

            From the mouth of Ohio DNR District 2 guy,…Ohio just revised the law from listing individual straight wall cartridges to those with a certain overall length like Michigan’s law. The 450 BM falls within the OAL limit therefore is legal. He said the info will be updated on the DNR website in time for the 2017 season.

    • yukon cornelius

      As of last year, indiana now allows some full-fledged rifle cartridges for deer hunting.

    • Nimrod

      And of course you could buy the same big bang in the American Ranch rifle which uses the same barrel and brake, is a pound lighter, cost half as much but is not as purty.

      • Quasimofo

        Yeah, but it’s not a SCOUT RIFLE, man…

        I just don’t see the value of the concept nowadays with RDS-type optics and reliable DBM-fed rifles in a variety of actions. Like the 9mm, technology has caught up with Cooper, IMO. Maybe I just don’t “get it”…

        • Dracon1201

          Scout rifles are fun with RDS, Imho it makes the concept come alive.

  • RealitiCzech

    That is a pretty rifle.

    So .450 Bushmaster is 250gr at 2200 fps. And like .458 SOCOM it’s single stack in AR mags… I guess that’s okay. A 30rd mag will be 14 or 15 rounds.

    Dammit, caliber is still too large, but I guess I could make my .351 WSL/Winchester 1907 corollary project be a .401 SL/Winchester 1910 corollary instead. That could be fun.

    • Giolli Joker

      9 .458 SOCOM rounds fit in a 30 rd AR mag.

      • RealitiCzech

        You are correct. Gah. I would need a surefire 60/maybe Magpul 40 to get proper 1907 capacity levels. I guess it must be the 1910 instead. The 20rd AR mag appears to be 5 rounds, in keeping with the 1910’s 4rd mags.

        • Anonymoose

          That would almost certainly jam a Surefire coffin mag to all hell and back.

          • Jared Vynn

            A big ol rotaryish magazine like you might see in borderlands (not a drum just rounds on the outer rim) could work. It would have to be about 8″ in diameter for about 40 rounds though.

          • Zachary marrs

            You don’t need to cram a .450 in a surefire mag to do that

      • I seem to remember someone trying the .458 SOCOM in one of the old 90rd MWG snail drums.

        • Giolli Joker

          If I had to bet, I’d say: Tony Rumore.
          If there’s something to be tested with .458 SOCOM, he has probably already tried it.

  • Andrew

    It’s really too bad that the Osprey 45 isn’t rated for .450 Bushmaster.

    • Anonymoose

      But the Hybrid is!

  • iksnilol

    Why not just get a 9.3x62mm?

    Y’know, something normal. Something more common. Or a .45/70.

    • Stuki Moi

      Too long for the Scout,I presume.

      • iksnilol

        Dude, it’s a Ruger. I swear, a Barret in .338 would be lighter than anything by Ruger.

        • Jared Vynn

          Ruger tends to over engineer everything it seems.

          • iksnilol

            I think it’s because they like casting so much. Then you need more metal.

          • Zachary marrs

            Ruger actions are stupid strong compared to most other options.

            S&W said the same stuff in their marketing years ago. But when’s the last time you read about loads that are only safe to fire in S&W pistols?

          • iksnilol

            Yeah, they’re stupid strong. No doubt. Just not lightweight.

            When I think of a pack gun or something, my mind never wanders to Ruger.

          • it’s just Boris

            Eh. 10/22 takedowns come to mind.

          • iksnilol

            Kinda heavy those, and very expensive considering everything has to be changed at one point.

            For takedowns I’d take a Browning .22 or Marlin Papoose.

          • Zachary marrs

            That has what to do with action strength?

        • Plus side, if you run out of ammo you can still bludgeon the target to death.

          • iksnilol

            That’s why I like Taurus. So cheap I don’t mind throwing them at my target. So you sorta get a shot more than the competition has (in regards to revolvers).

        • Stuki Moi

          I was referring to the length of the action. The current one has a .308 length action. You’d need a 30-06 class for the 9.3. Wasn’t Cooper himself so hung up on short actions that Steyr ended up creating some stumpy, .308 length “wildcat” caliber for their version of his “Lion Scout?” If so, Ruger may not even have to option of fitting a longer action, if they want to retain the Gunsite “certification.” The Colonel was an opinionated fella, not much given to compromise, from what I hear. And the Scout was his baby.

          • iksnilol

            Yeah, but the scout was also to be stupid lightweight and be able to be reloaded with stripper clips.

          • DW

            So much this. A mini30/VZ58 is more of a scout rifle than the GSR.

          • Paul White

            the general concept of a light handy rifle in an all rounder caliber is awesome, and has been done to death in various ways.

            The insistence on following Cooper’s checklist is crazy though. Why does the scope need to be forward mounted? I’ve never had a problem reloading a bolt action with a scope (and anyway most of them take external mags anyway). Why does it have to be a Cheng Sling? Why no more than exactly a yard long?

            It’s silliness and a great example of missing the forest for the trees.

          • it’s just Boris

            If I had to guess why ….

            Setting very hard, but not completely impossible, criteria can be an effective – if not very nice to the bidders – way to encourage getting as close as possible to the nominal ideal.

            If they come close enough, e.g. to just about what you thought you could realistically get, you declare it good enough.

          • Stuki Moi

            I believe the forward mount was inspired by express sights. For quick snapshots on a charging lion, a standard scope is insanely awkward. But at the same time, even Cooper had been dragged far enough along into the modern world, that he realized a scope was a necessity on a modern day general purpose rifle.

            You need to remember that “General Purpose” for Cooper wrt the Scout, meant really General Purpose. Essentially “You get One Rifle at birth. You keep it for the rest of your life, in which you will travel the entire world. Your rifle needs to work for the duration. Be reliable, fixable and useful for anything. You’ll need it to put meat on the table. To defend against bear charges, and fight the occasional war or two. As well as general self defense when you find yourself in the kind of places similarly unexplored and lawless to that faced by the great Scouts of the 19th century West.” (Not in any way Cooper’s words, just my read on the Scout concept.)

            For a purpose this general, the most important shots you’ll need to take, are the close-in ones. Miss a long shot at an Elk? Hey, just get back to stalking again! Have your big-ole Schmidt interfere with getting a quick hit off on a charging lion at 35 yards, or a bunch of marauding criminals closing in fast, and you get no second chance. So compromising minimally compared to a typical PH express rifle sight setup is priority one. Or perhaps priority two, after ensuring the rifle is light enough to always, really always, be with you. Then, but only within the constraints above, attempt to improve long range accuracy to meet modern standards. For that, a low power forward mount may not be such a bad idea.

            Personally, my biggest issue with the Scout Cooper had Steyr build, wasn’t the optic placement, nor any other of the features (The built in bipod is a bit too bling and failure prone for my taste….). But rather that, since Steyr built it on their standard, hardly wight optimized action, the only way to meet the 3kg weight budget, was to excessively thin out the barrel. So you ended up with a rifle whose normal “few shot” handling and reliability is compromised by a feed and load system (10 round box magazine) built to make sustained fire reasonable, yet with a barrel no more able to stand up to sustained fire, than that of a Kimber Montana.

            As I see it, to build a proper Scout, you’d need to start with a maximally relieved, ideally Ti or someething, action. Then build light and strong everywhere, but use a barrel that allows the rifle to be used properly for those few, but likely critical, times when that darned 10 round box actually makes a meaningful positive difference.

            But regardless of what You and I may think, if Ruger wants the Gunsite moniker on their Scout, it’s what the current crew at Gunsite thinks that matters. And they do have their founder’s legacy and integrity to take into consideration.

        • Kevin Craig

          Lighter than the listed 6.6 pounds?

    • CommonSense23

      It’s got to due with some states stupid hunting laws.

    • gusto

      If I ever get a big chunk of throw around money I am going to commision a
      winchester 1895, mag fed leveraction, doesn’t have to be an original I can take a miroku new production
      chamber it for 9,3×62, 50cm-ish barrel
      Some sort of quick detach scope mount

      That is a great big for EU/US-all-purpose game

      • Old SF MJT

        9.3X62…Isn’t that the .338 Lapua round?

        De Oppresso Liber

    • Renegade

      Not common enough in the U.S.

      • iksnilol

        True, but 45/70 should be hella common.

        • Renegade

          45/70 is pretty dang common, albeit expensive. I guess the question becomes does a Gunsite Scout in 45/70 take away sales from the Guide Gun?

  • Paul White

    Sounds like a blast but 450 Bushmaster is spotty to get, even online. SGAmmo, Ammo To GO and Midway are all sold out entirely when I checked yesterday. And it’s 1100 bucks.

    I get the appeal for states that restrict what type of rifle cartridges you use but damn.

  • Stuki Moi

    Whatever happened to the BLK Scout? For a “versatile” rifle with a short barrel, BLK’s the one I’d want…

  • UCSPanther

    I like the idea of something like a SMLE No. 5 Jungle carbine, but chambered in a cartridge like 45-70.

    The Ruger scout rifle in 450 Bushmaster is as close as one can get. Now, we need a bolt action carbine chambered in .50 Beowulf…

    • DrewN

      Brockmans used to make a sweet bolt gun in .50.

    • Kevin Craig

      Terminology quibble: SMLE was the No. 1 family; the No. 5 was a shortened derivative of the No. 4 family.

      • noob

        There were about 200 “no 6” jungle carbine prototypes built on SMLE no 1 actions by Lithgow arms in Australia as an experiment in 1944. This was because Australia went through ww2 never having adopted the no4. Ian at Forgotten Weapons has a great video on three examples for sale at the James D Julia Auction House.

        • Kevin Craig

          Don’t forget the 1922-24 ShtLE Mk.V, which was only used in trials and not adopted. It’s like a SMLE with a rear peep sight.

          I have one, gleefully acquired from a notorious rip-off dealer who thought it was “just another ol’ smelly.”

    • iksnilol

      Mosins are easy to rechamber to 45/70. Just deburr the action and should run slick.

      • UCSPanther

        That is true. I have seen a project where a Mosin was turned into a 45-70 cannon.

        Personally, I prefer the aesthetics of the Jungle Carbine, especially the protruding detachable magazine and conical flash hider. I have always liked the idea of such a rifle in a large bore, medium range cartridge like 45-70, 444 marlin or something similar.

        • iksnilol

          Hmm, conical flash hiders are available for Mosins… not hard to do. Then there is 10 round mags for it as well (think you might get 8 rounds in them in 45/70 or something due to angles.)

          Should be close in regards to look, but not detachable mag.

      • Rick O’Shay

        This is something I’ve never heard of, and while I’ve always said “I’ll never bubba my Mosin,” suddenly I’m tempted to bubba my Mosin.

        • iksnilol

          Think about it, 45/70 vs 7.62x54mmR; both are rimmed and have somewhat similar width.

          You mainly need to take into account that 7.62×54 is more tapered and longer.

          • Rick O’Shay

            Yeah. I can see the similarities, and as far as mods on a Mosin go, it’s not the worst I’ve ever heard.

  • NoDakNative

    450 Bushmaster Max pressure is listed as 40,000 PSI. This is for the AR-15 type actions that fire it.

    The Ruger action can easily take 60,000 PSI rounds like the 308 Winchester.

    How long until we see “Ruger Only” 450 Bushmaster loads? Would be quite a boost in performance. Case life may be an issue, but the parent case is the 284 Winchester. So the case may hold up fine in a bolt gun. Not commercially obviously, except perhaps Buffalo Bore, but reloaders would for sure be souping things up.

    • UCSPanther

      Reloaders have been doing it for years with 45-70. In the Hornady reloading manual, they have loads with 500 grain slugs for use in the Ruger No.1 and other sturdy actions.

      • NoDakNative

        Yup, that’s what I was thinking of. I own a Ruger Redhawk in 357 Magnum and have fired loads out of it that would literally blow up other 357 Magnums.

        Running some ideas of powder and bullets in QuickLoad gives several hundred extra FPS boost while keeping pressure just below 50,000 PSI. (Keeping a Safety Margin.)

  • Jim_Macklin

    Cooper wanted a Thumper. Cooper would approve and so will Alaskan bear hunters

    • iksnilol

      You can just use a brass catcher. Easier than with a bolt action.

  • George K. Reed

    Cut to the chase. Make the Rifle in the 45-70
    That will will do what the 450 Bushmaster does plus a while lot more, up and down versatility. That is an awesome cartridge / gun combo I would spend 11 bills on.

    • FOC Ewe

      You could always look for a nice Siamese Mauser conversion. I love mine ?

    • uisconfruzed

      458 SOCOM has the same short cartridge with the same ballistics.

  • Jeff Brown

    Kinda reinventing the .444 Marlin really.

  • noob

    Is there any glass with bdc for 45 bushy? Or do we need to just use mil dots?

  • El Duderino

    Left handed version?

  • disqus_FvZ6sgYBr2

    So I wonder when they will chamber rifles in the Smith & Wesson .460 magnum?

  • Brett

    I don’t know what it is but I want it.

  • Doesn’t that look great in walnut? I wonder if Ruger will offer the other two calibres in walnut too?

  • uisconfruzed

    I’d buy it TODAY if it was in 458 SOCOM with a 1/14″, and drop the price by skipping the brake.