Falkor Defense Dracos Composite Barrel System and Firearms | Shot 2017

If you noticed the green barrels in the FLIR video: we did too! We took Edward O and the camera crew over to the Falkor booth to learn about their new Dracos straight jacket barrel sleeve system. This barrel uses a composite sleeve as a heat sink to maintain accuracy even after thousands of high temperature rounds. 300 Win Mag and 300 Norma are usually considered barrel-burners, but Falkor guarantees the Dracos system for life.

We also look at the production version of their Optimus PDW stock and their Petra 300 Norma rifle.

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Edward O

Edward is a Canadian gun owner and target shooter with a Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism. Crawling over mountains with tactical gear is his idea of fun. He blogs at TV-Presspass and tweets @TV_PressPass.


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  • Harry’s Holsters

    I really want to run one of these barrel through their paces and see what the actual life it. They have to be betting that most people will never shoot enough to burn a barrel out.

  • JumpIf NotZero

    No actual contact with individual fiber ends…. I mean I’ve only been working with composites for 17 years or so… but that looks like a good insulator to me.

    • MissingName

      Fibers? As far as i know this version has an Aluminium sleeve.

      • ostiariusalpha

        Yeah, what the hell are wildbillb and JINZ banging on about? The only carbon fiber mentioned was from other manufacturers’ barrels, and the epoxy is just bonding the steel core to the sleeve.

  • wildbillb

    composites are insulators, not conductors (thermal or electrical). it will NOT work as a heatsink. The steel ‘barrel’ will get hotter than normal, change its internal diameter, and pressures will INCREASE. The epoxy and outer shell constrain the inner steel from expanding. The epoxy is a mechanical constraint, but does nothing to get rid of heat.

    this is the case for all graphite/epoxy barrels. i’ve got a lot of data on analysis i did for Christiansen Arms years ago…

    • MikeSmith13807

      The filler material moves heat away from the barrel to be dissipated by the sleeve. Look up Teludyne– the technology has been around for years and is fully validated.

      • wildbillb

        i’m familiar with Teludyne.

        the epoxy will not move the heat away as fast as steel. so in this config, the epoxy is actually a layer of insulation, where thermal dissipation is slowed between the barrel and the sleeve. a solid steel barrel will dissipate heat much more efficiently.

        the second factor is that the epoxy will have a different coefficient of thermal expansion, and eventually it will delaminate between both surfaces, causing gaps, etc which will increase the thermal ‘resistance’.

        • MikeSmith13807

          I don’t think that he should have used the word epoxy. How about if you have serious questions you ask them on the Teludyne Facebook page instead of spreading bad information about something you don’t know about here? If everything you say is true, then I guess there are a bunch of people out there who gave them a bunch of money for a bad product and haven’t bothered to complain about it. Are you sure that’s a better explanation than the possibility that you have incomplete or inaccurate information?

        • Jr Dirty

          There are plenty of thermally conductive epoxies.

  • iksnilol

    Now I ain’t no government scientician, but that looks like an insulator and not a heatsink to me.

    I would think that if you wanted a heatsink you’d go with an aluminium sleeve over a steel barrel or something that absorbs (and sheds) the heat from the barrel quicker than the material the barrel is made of (steel).

    • ostiariusalpha

      It is an aluminum sleeve.

      • iksnilol

        I thought it was CF.

        My bad, folks. Again, not a scientistician yet.

        • JumpIf NotZero

          I did the same thing. What dummy calls it a composite (as in composition of multiple things, and not made of composite material) barrel system?

          • User

            Its steel, epoxy, and aluminium = composite

    • MikeSmith13807

      That’s what it does, it moves the heat away from the barrel.

  • Edeco

    Saying “composite sleeve” in the text is a bit misleading. Looks like composite barrel with basically a metal sleeve. Might not be factually incorrect, could argue whether the epoxy and metal are a composite but a different image comes to mind.

    Anyway, I want this, 27″, the new Nosler 22, extra long gas hole, 16″ out. Can’t afford to own or use, but want.

  • SomeRandomGuy

    This has more to do with harmonic dampening than acting as a heatsink. Since the harmonics of a typical steel barrel change as it heats up, by negating the vast majority of resonant harmonics in the barrel itself, you preempt much in the way of any significant thermal resonant shift.

    • IndustrialHEAT

      Though, if the “supurr seekrit” resin that’s filled between the barrel and sleeve had some kind of heat-conductive material (carbon particle, or some kind of micro-crystaline powder like industrial diamond dust or synthetic sapphire powder, all great conductors of heat), it would help pull heat from the steel in the barrel as well.

  • ostiariusalpha

    Epoxy? Bah! If it isn’t explosively clad to the sleeve I’m not interested, preferably with a Stellite 25 core. Because explosion! Seriously, I am curious how much heat their epoxy can take before degradation, especially on a semi-auto.

    • User

      Yeah, im interested whats the reason, maybe its that they just dont have the patents, and hardtry to sell something. Or because they see that they have some advantages compared to CLAD. Or they… just dont have the machines.

      • ostiariusalpha

        Well, using epoxy to bond the sleeve to the core is considerably less expensive than explosive cladding, and as MikeSmith13807 has pointed out, the Teludyne StraightJacket method already has a track record.

      • MikeSmith13807

        In most places it’s referred to as a “proprietary media”. In one place they called it “proprietary metal alloy”. Some speculate it includes carbon fiber, others guess copper. Whatever it is, it’s really good at moving heat away from the barrel and dissipating it, so that the barrel accuracy doesn’t change as you shoot more rounds quickly.

        Just go to their web site or Google “teludyne tech review”. Guns America did some in-depth stories and testing a few years ago. The system has been used by many competition shooters (some secretly, because they don’t want their competition to know about it), including Olympic shooters.

    • MikeSmith13807

      I didn’t look it up but if I remember correctly from past discussions of the system I don’t think epoxy is the right term to use here. It is a highly conductive proprietary material that moves heat away from the barrel.

      • ostiariusalpha

        A proprietary mixture I’m sure, but the composite media is still an epoxy. Both Falkor and Teludyne call it such, because the term itself covers a very wide spectrum of material without giving any specific clues to it’s make-up. There are specific types of epoxy, of course, many of which are composite in nature.

      • Jr Dirty

        There are heat conductive epoxies that can withstand very high temperatures (I’ve used a non electrically conductive, but thermally conductive, one to pot electronics before, it can go up to 500oC before degrading) so wouldn’t be surprised if it’s that sort of material.

  • guest

    1) Epoxy of ANY kind will lose mechanical properties at the temp levels a barrel may experience, and that will ultimately lead to delamination and finally the epoxy deteriorating completely.
    2) alloys of different composition will ALWAYS expand in a different way. Not good for barrels of any kind!
    3) Non-uniform expansion of barrels which leads to barrels warping or otherwise bending out of shape enough to have a significant impact on accuracy is solved either the cheap and easy way by having a thermal insulator around the barrel (to keep it equally hot all around) or by investing time and money into getting the entire machining process to deliver a barrel that expands in a uniform way when heated up. Latter solution is expensive but technically the most advantageous.

    • MikeSmith13807

      You don’t know enough about this system. It has been around for years and has been thoroughly tested and validated.

      • guest

        No, I don’t know enough. Because nobody buys the POS because it holds no advantages hence it is unknown and obscure.
        But you are welcome to post the “thorough tests” and “validations” any time you like.

        • MikeSmith13807

          Seriously? Did you spend even 30 seconds on Google before posting that reply? Just because the company doesn’t do much marketing doesn’t mean the product isn’t what it’s claimed to be. I’m not going to post links here, go look it up for yourself. There are plenty of reviews and happy customers out there including repeat customers. They have also done stuff for secret squirrel high speed low drag types.

  • MikeSmith13807

    Guys, this is simply a franchise of the Teludyne StraightJacket system that has been around for years. It’s completely proven and tested. The tech is real and legitimate. It will dramatically shrink you groups when your barrel heats up. It’s no use on a range toy, but a game-changer in something like a DMR application where you need accuracy at extended ranges when you’re firing fast. Think Travis Haley on that roof in Iraq.

    • Marcus D.

      The Teludyne barrels I remember seeing in the past were, as I recall, an inch in diameter. This particular barrel appears a lot thinner, yes? I was always impressed with that tech but can’t justify the cost for the shooting I do. Heck, my whole rifle cost what one barrel does!

  • 1ST CAV MEDIC 69 ✔Trump Train

    I was looking a t the Petra 300 NORMA at $6500, then went looking for ammo. Noveske listed Burris rounds at about $4.50 per. It only shoots slightly better than 6.5 Creedmoor anyhow and $0.60 per round, welllllllll.

  • 1ST CAV MEDIC 69 ✔Trump Train

    The main point here is they guarantee it for LIFE. Can you get any better than that?