Inland Manufacturing’s NEW Jungle M1 Carbine

M1-Jungle

Inland Manufacturing, known for their reintroduction of the M1 carbine and various faithful reproductions, as announced a new version of the rifle, the Jungle Carbine. The new carbine is extremely similar to the standard M1 carbine, but adds a conical flash hider and correct military model sights.

M1-Jungle2

Interestingly, this model is equipped with 1/2 x 28 threads so the flash hider can be removed. While I applaud the use of threaded barrel (as the .30 carbine is great for suppression), the choice of threads for the model is most peculiar, even dangerous. Typically, .30 cal bores are 5/8 x 24 as 1/2 x 28 is a bit thin at the front of the gun. Typically, 1/2×28 threaded muzzle devices are bored for .223 cartridges, so buyers will have to be very careful about selection of muzzle devices and suppressors.

The Jungle Carbine will accept the normal 10, 20, and 30-round magazines. It is sold with a single 15-round magazine.

M1-Jungle3

Detailed Specs (courtesy of Inland):

  • Caliber: .30 Carbine
  • Weight: 5.5 pounds
  • Barrel: 18 inches (including flash hider)
  • Overall length: 34 inches
  • Stock: American Walnut
  • Accessories: One 15-round magazine (California carbines get a 10-round magazine)
  • When the original purchaser’s warranty coupon is received by Inland within 60 days of purchase, a military-style cloth sling will be sent to the purchaser at no charge as receipt confirmation for the warranty coupon.

MSRP is set at $1,079. Jungle Carbines are available exclusively through MKS Supply. 



Nathan S.

One of TFB’s resident Jarheads, Nathan now works within the firearms industry. A consecutive Marine rifle and pistol expert, he enjoys local 3-gun, NFA, gunsmithing, MSR’s, & high-speed gear. Nathan has traveled to over 30 countries working with US DoD & foreign MoDs.

Nathan can be reached at Nathan.S@TheFirearmBlog.com

The above post is my opinion and does not reflect the views of any company or organization.


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  • nova3930

    30 carbine tops out at what? 38ksi and change? Good quality pistol suppressor would probably work well. Maybe an Octane 9 or similar?

    • Harry’s Holsters

      I’ve never seen a suppressed M1 Carbine. That would be as cool as a suppressed sten or lever gun! Thanks for the idea!

  • gunsandrockets

    What is the deal with the shape of the stock beyond the barrel band? Did they make that change for ease of manufacture? Better action bedding? What?

    I just bought an Auto-Ordinance carbine and it has the same stock shape. Does Inland and Auto-Ordinance share the same stock maker?

    • Bal256

      That is the rumor going around the interwebs. Both also have reports of less than stellar reliability.

      • gunsandrockets

        I’ve read the report of spotty QC. I was careful to inspect my carbine for obvious defects before purchase, but I haven’t test fired it yet. Auto-Ordinance has been making the carbine for many years now, and my hope is that the QC problems belong more to the earlier production examples.

        • Marcus D.

          The reviews I’ve read pointed mainly to the provided mags. Buy surplus GI for better reliability, so I’ve read. There was a review in a link around here recently by nutnfancy which panned the Inland for constant misfeeds. I was pretty disappointed, since I want to buy a carbine before they are banned here in California–which as things look now will be by the end of the year on new sales, retroactive registration for prior purchases as “assault weapons” that cannot be transferred in state by sale, gift or bequeath.

          • gunsandrockets

            http://www.m1carbinesinc.com is a good reference resource

          • Marcus D.

            That reference has only two current manufacturers (Auto Ordnance and Fulton Armory), and of course add Inland to that now. Fulton is the priciest ($1300+), and likely the best. They are direct sellers. Inland is supposed to be GI spec, and the Fulton most certainly is, the Auto Ordnance is not. Fulton also uses walnut stocks (like most of the originals although later models for export were birch) which it buys from Boyds. According to nutnfancy, the gun he bought did not appear to have a walnut stock, although Inland advertises it as such.

          • gunsandrockets

            Sadly, you can’t legally buy G.I. M1 carbine mags in Commiefornia.

            Apparently some failures to feed are caused by the operating spring being too weak rather than magazine issues. At least that defect is easily remedied.

          • Marcus D.

            True true. nutnfancy strangely enough did not have issues with 10 round mags.

          • The Brigadier

            Most of the weakness is misdiagnosed to rubbing of the spring on grit on the inside of the walls from the manufacturing. Take the mag apart and clean all of the parts and coat them with a light coat of firearm grease. Tetra works great for this. I had misfires on my new M1A until at a .308 forum they told me about cleaning all my mags regardless of the caliber. Only a few manufacturers bother to clean and lube their mags and PMAG is one of them. For every one elses, clean and lube your mags and shoot with confidence. Since doing this for my M1A I have had NO misfires since.

          • Lt_Scrounge

            I never have had a problem with Mec Gar mags. Even for guns that every other mag brand have been miserable failures with, MecGar always seem to work. Of course they are the OEM magazine maker for most of the top firearms brands in the world for a reason.

          • Steve Skubinna

            There are a lot of counterfeit 30 round mags out there, and I’ve had major failure to feed problems with many of them. USGI can be hard to find, but recently I got some ProMag new construction ones which look good, though I havent tried them yet.

          • The Brigadier

            Most people don’t know this, but you have to take your new mags apart and clean the inside of the walls and the spring. Lube them both very lightly with a light firearm grease and reassemble and your misfire problems will be a thing of the pass.

          • Lt_Scrounge

            Try the Korean military issue ones. Since the Koreans used the M1 Carbine for decades until they were able to get something better, they know how to make the magazines to work.

          • Lt_Scrounge

            If feeding is an issue, try swapping out the magazine catch with one from an M2. I got two M1 carbines for a song because the owners didn’t realize that the feeding problems (that they never revealed but were obvious once I tried them with ammo in the magazines.) could be fixed with an $8 part that took 5 minutes or less to change and/or a new magazine. Unfortunately I was forced to sell them. I recently traded a pistol I didn’t care for after I got it for another carbine that the owner lied about it’s provenance. No big deal, I wasn’t looking for a collector’s item, I was looking for a lightweight shooter. A little research, a few replacement parts, and a little work and it looks like it could have stormed the beaches of Normandy. Got rid of the crummy looking sheet metal hand guard and replaced it with a new wooden one, then stripped the varnish off the stock and gave it all a nice oil finish. You would have to look fairly hard to see that the stock and hand guard weren’t a set from the get go. Added the M2 magazine catch to allow for the use of 30 round magazines if I feel like it.

  • Sasquatch

    This is on the list but… dat price though.

    • Harry’s Holsters

      On my list too. Only it’s a couple hundred down there. Price would change that but then they probably couldn’t produce it.

  • datimes

    In 1972 I bought a used Inland .30 carbine with a 4X scope that didn’t appear to have ever been fired for $100. Had a lot of fun with that gun and learned reloading to save money.

  • Make it in 9mm or .45 or 5.7×28… or anything other than .30 Carbine – and I’ll be interested.
    10mm or .357 SIG and I’d be a lot interested.

    • DrewN

      ?? Nothing wrong with .30 Carbine. It certainly hits harder than 9mm or .357 Sig and is just as easy to reload. Initial buy in for brass might be a little more, but that’s the only downside besides bullet selection.

      • iksnilol

        Nothing wrong with it except for its lack of availability. I’d love one of these in 9×19 simply because Marlin Camp Carbines aren’t made anymore and are slightly worn to hell and back here in Norway. Could probably split the price with other people to get it reviewed in Norway to be legal for hunting.

        • Bill

          The Camp Carbine is a highly under-appreciated little gun that needs to make a resurgence, ideally accepting GLOCK mags.

          • maodeedee

            Glock 20 mags in 10mm that is.

      • maodeedee

        Hits harder? The 30 carbine round? a 110 grain projectile at 1900 fps would not hit harder than a 357 Sig with a 125 grain projectile of a larger diameter traveling at 1700 fps out of an 18 inch barrel.

        And bullet selection in 30 caliber in that weight range is Pi$$-poor. Hunting deer with a 30 carbine would be more likely to wound rather than to result in a clan kill no matter what bullet was used.

        Make mine a 10mm. I also don’t get why a 30 M1 carbine should have a flash hider like a Mk V British SMLE added on to it. Inland goes to a lot of trouble to make an exact duplicate of a USGI m1 carbine and then they slap on “Jungle Carbine” flash hider and call it a “Jungle carbine” ?

        And besides, the term “Jungle” isn’t used any more. The jungle is called a “Rain Forest” now.

        • The Brigadier

          Except the .357 cartridge is a pistol caliber and is designed to do maximum damage up close. It fails when you try to shoot things far away with it. Perhaps if they gave it a Nosler tip and a boat tail it might fair better at 150 yards, but the .30 caliber can shoot accurately out to 350 yards and still kill you. I have three .357 revolvers, and saddle guns in that caliber don’t work well at all.

        • Marcus D.

          That flash hider was employed in Vietnam, which is why it appears on this gun, and explains the name.

    • Harry’s Holsters

      If you want one of the those buy a different gun. Lots of great options out there. Someone needs to do a non AR 10mm though.

      • FightFireJay

        Then may I suggest a MechTech TCU?

      • But what if I want those classic looks and easy handling? No… I reject your argument. An M1C in 10mm would be SWEET.

        • Harry’s Holsters

          To each his own but I just don’t see it appealing to many vs a more modern 10mm.

        • The Brigadier

          Again its a pistol round that works better up close just like all the other pistol rounds they make brush guns for. The thirty-thirty round is a good brush round and is an effective 100 yard varmint gun, and it was designed as a rifle round, a very short range rifle round in spite of the long length of the cartridge. Don’t confuse the short range power of a magnum revolver round with a medium to long range rifle round. Different animals and different results for each.

    • Marcus D.

      The .30 Carbine is a solid 200 meter gun, and you can buy Hornady ballistic tip bullets that are effective for deer, coyote and hogs. Unfortunately, that and FMJ is all you get, even though there are probably a million of these rifles in circulation.

      • And not enough .30 Carbine ammunition anywhere.

        • The Brigadier

          See if you can find brass for it and load your own. I used to and its easy to load and cuts the price down per round substantially.

      • maodeedee

        Hornady ballistic tip ammo would not work well on hogs and a 110 grain expanding bullet would be more likely to wound a deer rather make a clean kill unless you were within 100 yards and it was a perfect broadside shot.
        Always use enough gun, and use the right gun for the job. And yes, the dinky little 110 grain bullet will travel 200 meters but not without a fair amount of drop and wind drift.

        • Marcus D.

          What is “fair amount”? According to ballistic charts, drop is about 15″ at 200 yards, increasing precipitously after that. The muzzle energy and ballistic profile is roughly equivalent to .357 mag out of an 18″ barrel. Yes some states do not allow them for deer, but then again, some states don’t allow rifles either.

          • The Brigadier

            Yet the military sights on the rifle are calibrated out to 400 yds. It is a big arc out to that range, but it will get there and do a lot of damage when it does.

        • The Brigadier

          The dinky little bullet will fly out to 350 yards and in 1974 I saw a South Vietnamese soldier kill a VC with a shot at 400 yards.

          • Marcus D.

            I agree that one should never underestimate the killing power of bullet. Even a dinky little .22 LR can still inflict fatal injuries a mile away. I remember arguing with someone once who claimed that you can’t shoot a black powder rifle past 100 yards; yet the military spec for the 1861 Springfield was 300 yards (though rarely used at that distance). The Army tested the .45-70 for maximum range, and even at over 3000 yards, while not accurate for anything but volley fire, the bullet still buried itself 8 inches deep in sand. The main issue with the little .30 is the same as with all military ammo; full metal jackets, compounded in the .30 Carbine by a round nose bullet instead of a spitzer round.

          • The Brigadier

            I have always wondered why they didn’t try a spitzer tip and a boattail for that caliber. Perhaps they did and the the result was unsatisfactory.
            Read about the lengthy time it took to get the 7.62X51 cartridge for the M14 and the FAL. 168 grain bullets for those rifles are the optimum bullet for the flattest flight and the greatest accuracy and it took years to get the cartridge right.
            A more recent example can also be found for the .338 Lapua cartridge. It took the company who bought the rights and the equipment from the Finns another three years of round the clock work until they, like the designers of the .308 cartridge, the .338 Lapua designers found the magic combination of length, weight, shape, type of powder and the powder load itself.
            I’m pretty sure the .30 Carbine round can be improved upon and I think if it can be boosted up to around 2300 FPS with a slightly larger bullet it will be a world changer. I am going to try and see if I can find the magic combination.

          • Marcus D.

            It probably has to do with OAL and/or the loss of powder space when stuffing a longer bullet in while maintaining OAL. It is a pretty short bullet. There are HPs at 110 gr, but they are not boattails. About the lightest true rifle round (the round nose at 110 gr. being pretty much a pistol bullet) in .308 is 147 grain Sierra, but not being a reloader, I don’t know if you’d have enough room left in the case to push it up to 2000 fps or more.

          • The Brigadier

            It might necessitate a slightly longer case or it might not. A lot of cases have enough room for larger bullets and a little more powder. When S&W was developing the .357 with George S. Patton, they were originally going to make the new magnum round using the .38 Special case. There was plenty of room for the extra grains of powder, but S&W was afraid cops and other .38 Special owners would try and shoot the magnum round in their old spindly revolvers.
            Early .38s were low powered for a reason. Weaker steel and thinner barrels were the rule and they were rightly afraid of catastrophic failure if the new magnum cartridge was fired in the spindly revolver. S&W lengthened the case by another 1/8″ and the .357 cartridge was born. This new cartridge really helped develop much stronger revolvers frames and thicker barrels. They made Patton a pair of stouter revolvers and he took them to battle in Europe.
            The same length increase can be done for the .30 carbine case if needed and perhaps it can be named the .30 Carbine Magnum or more simply the M1M. I’d bet the new rifle will only weigh a pound or more so than the current rifle.

          • maodeedee

            it would not only require a longer case but woupld would require a fatter case diameter and then you might as well make it a 35 caliber rather than a 30, something like the original 351 Winchester self-loader cartridge which drove a 180 gr bullet at 1,870 ft/s

          • The Brigadier

            The trick will be to get the cartridge right and keep the same action and low weight with only a small increase. ARs fire all kind of calibers and remain relatively light and they are all high speed bullets from around 2700 to 3400 FPS. I am suggesting keeping the barrel at 16 inches and increasing the speed to around 2350-2400 FPS. It will require a beefed up chamber and barrel, but I would keep the weight of the bullet around 130 grains rather than 147 grains like the .308 training round.
            Nowadays most manufacturers pass the 147 grain cartridge for the .308 rifles as though its a battle round. It was only a training round bullet back in the day and it was less powerful and less accurate than the 168 grain bullet that still is the true battle round. Coming up with a new bullet would be better than trying to make the 147 grain bullet fit.
            I would prefer something lighter for the new M1 Carbmag to also keep the straight case rather than a necked down case. It would have to be a little bit longer, but again an extra 1/8 or perhaps 3/16 of an inch would be doable with only a little extra weight in the beefed up barrel. The changes would be relatively minor keeping the best attributes of the War Baby as the M1 Carbine was also called, but the speed increase and bullet size and shape changes would introduce a whole new lethal spectrum for that successful rifle.

          • maodeedee

            A 147 grain bullet would only do about 900 fps when seated deep enough to feed. It doesn’t have the case capacity necessary to push a heavier thaan 110 grain bullet, say 120 grains much beyond 1500 fps or the existing 110 grain bullet much faster than 2100 fps and that would require 55,000 PSI pressure. The cartridge is already loaded to very high pressures for what is essentially a pistol round.

            The most velocity I was ever able to get out of it was 2000 fps using sierra 110 grain spire point hollow points but they would not feed out of the magazine. That load also produced 1700 fps out of a 30 carbine Ruger Blackhawk which is what I developed the load for.

            The reason the sierra bullet gave higher velocities was thea the jacket came to a point but the lead cor was in the base of the bullet. as a result ther was less friction as the bullet entered the throat of the barrel resulting in higher velocities

    • The Brigadier

      The .30 caliber carbine shoots at 1950 FPS. It has inflicted more casualties on our enemies than any other rifle in the history of our nation and that includes M16/M4’s. With a good barrel and quality ammo it is a straight shooter. Its also light, dependable and a joy to carry through the bush. I am a .308 shooter usually, but the M1 Carbine is my first choice for CQB.

  • Bill

    I don’t get it, particularly at that price. If you’re a megafan of the Carbine maybe you’ll shell out the beans, but for a light, handy working carbine there’s the Mini 14 and multiple lever and bolt guns besides ARs, that fit that weight and size envelope in more readily available cartridges for less money.

    • Andy

      My thoughts exactly.

  • I agree, there is not enough meat left in the barrel with 1/2X28 threads for 30 caliber barrels. Not only that but this will encourage people to screw devices not made for 30 caliber pressures or bullet diameters onto the barrel. A aluminum 9mm suppressor will most likely eventually fail from 30 carbine pressures unless its way over built.

  • Dracon1201

    Nutnfancy already gave Inland carbines a rather scathing review. I wonder if these will be any better.

  • charles Brown

    30 cal ammo ?? its all over the place!! Try Agulia or Armscor actually Inland has a smoking deal on their Inland Depot website on 300 rounds and a MTM ammo box-

    • Steve Skubinna

      S&B also manufactures good .30 Carbine ammo.

  • Dragonheart

    I am really glad the M1 carbine is being brought back. It is a great little rifle, that has been severely underrated, mainly because it has always been compared to the Garand. Maybe the price will become more competitive and ammunition become more available and less expensive; one can hope.

    • Lt_Scrounge

      All it would take for the price to come down is for the President to override the Hitlery State dept ban on the reimportation of the hundreds of thousands of WWII vintage M1 carbines and Garands that we left in Korea at the end of the Korean War for the South Korean military to use. Importers and collectors have been screaming for the ban to be lifted but they have refused claiming that they are afraid that the weapons will be used by criminals.

  • waltinvt

    I carried an M-2 Carbine in Nam ’67-68 and as far as I know the only difference was my M-2 had full auto with a selector at the trigger guard. Unlike the M-16, the M-2 could be covered in mud and not malfunction. With taped banana Mags, it was a decent weapon. Would love to have one now but over a grand for a replica is too much.

  • Zebra Dun

    $1079.00 Gulp!

  • Marcus D.

    At $1700 to $2200 for a (beautifully) refurbished M! Carbine, these are too steep for my budget.