Gun Review: Lancer L30 LTR Precision Rifle

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Lancer Systems is known for their high quality polymer magazines for ARs and other small arms. A few years ago, Lancer entered the accessories market with their carbon-fiber furniture and flared magwell add-on. Nowadays, Lancer Systems is making completed AR-15 and AR-10 style high-end rifles. I recently tested the Lancer L30 LTR Precision Rifle and I was very impressed by it.

 

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The Lancer L30 LTR, Long-range Tactical Rifle, is an AR-10 pattern rifle that’s made for long range precision type shooting. It’s equipped with a Bartlein 24″ stainless steel heavy profile match barrel, 18-in Lancer L30 carbon-fiber handguard, billet upper and lower receiver, Geissele match trigger and KFS adjustable  competition stock, and two Lancer L7 magazines.

 

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The Lancer L7 magazine is probably the best magazine made for the AR-10 rifle with DPMS/SR25 spec magwell. The L7 Magaine is constructed from aerospace-grade polymer with stainless steel feed-lip and reinforcement.  The billet lower receiver features enlarged magazine release, ambidextrous bolt catch buttons, and interchangeable magwell extension. The one show here is the competition flared magwell, the Lancer magwell extension also available in the smaller Tactical version and the standard size.

 

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The Lancer L30 18-inch carbon fiber handguard attached directly to the custom billet upper’s proprietary long barrel nut extension. Once it’s screwed down the 8x mounting bolts, the handguard and the upper receiver form a monolithic unit. A section of the handguard top rail has a scallop cutout to accommodate a large objective from an optic. Under carbon-fiber handguard, the 24″ stainless match barrel has an adjustable gas system.

 

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The installed KFS TacMod adjustable precision stock was developed with help of US Army’s Marksmanship Unit (AMU). It features a rubber recoil pad, height adjustable kydex cheek piece, adjustable length of pull and cant. The KFS stock by itself retails for $269 w/o buffer and spring.

 

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The receivers have the following installed: Ergo flat-top dulexe rubber overmolding grip, Raptor ambi charging handle, Geissele Hi-Speed Nation Match 2-stage trigger. All of those are premium components.

 

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The Lancer Viper muzzle brake. The beautifully polished triple-port muzzle brake is highly effective in reducing recoil but it’s also loud and concussive. When I was zeroing the Lancer L30 LTR at a public range, the blast from the Viper brake effectively cleared the shooting lane on either side of me. No much of an issue when I was out in the desert doing long range.

 

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Tangent Theta TT525P 5-25x56mm long-range scope mount in a set of Talley Heavy duty tactical 34mm rings. The Canadian made high-end scope features first focal plane illuminated reticle, Mils/Mils adjustment (MOA reticle is available) and five-fold magnification with a 56mm objective. The Tangent Theta TT525P 5-25x56mm model is available for custom order for $4250.

 

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The accuracy test was conducted at the range of 100 yards. My accuracy data is the average of two 5-shot groups fired from the bench.

WPA Gold 150gr SP = 1.15″ Avg
WPA Polyformance 145 gr FMJ = 1.46″ Avg
Black Hills 180 gr Nosler ballistic tip = 0.83″ Avg
Black Hills 168 gr Barnes Triple Shock = 1.11″ Avg.

The rifle actually comes with a test fire target that shows it can do 1/2 MOA groups with Federal Match ammo. I think the Lancer tester is a much better shot than me.

 

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Lancer L30 LTR Specification:
Caliber: 308 Win and 6.5 Creedmoor
Barrel: 24-in Bartlein Stainless Steel heavy profile
Twist Rate: 308 Win/1:11.24, 6.5 Creedmoor: 1:8
Action: Direct Gas impingement, rotate bolt, rifle-length gas system
Weight: 12.5 pounds
Price: $4199 MSRP


Writer and gear editor with articles published in major gun publications. A five year combat veteran of the US Marine Corps, Tim is also part of Point & Shoot Media Works, a producer of photography, video and web media for the firearms and shooting sport industry. Tim’s direct contact: Tyan.TFB -at- gmail.com


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  • TheSmellofNapalm

    I’ll take a Creedmoor please. Those Hornady ELD-X rounds just found a new home.

  • JumpIf NotZero

    Haven’t used them, but I’m not at all crazy about those Theta turrets.

  • JumpIf NotZero

    Ah… 24″ heaviest 308 barrel you can get… Good thing it has a carbon handguard to offset what, maybe 4oz? At least it looks proportional.

    Geez, that accuracy leaves a LOT to be desired though.

    Proof barrels, all the way.

  • Xeno Da Morph

    Anyone here used their carbon fixed stock??

    • JumpIf NotZero

      There is a reason KAC, LMT, and LaRue have lived long lives while everyone else in the AR10 comes and goes.

      Most AR10s do not shoot like bolt guns. People expect them to, but they don’t. The follow through is massively important and people don’t get it.

      At a precision AR class, I saw three guys bring AR10s, and one SCAR 17, none of them did well, not nearly as well as the guys with good 556 guns, even out to 750y.

      The KAC needs a different spring and weight esp when suppressed. LaRue manages great, but only with a couple of specific ammos (m118lr and 168GM) and specific cans (Surefire or other low back pressure ). And LMT can get there no doubt.

      Personally, if I do an AR10 will be a Mega with Proof barrel (same as my recce/spr), but I’m going to cut it to 14″ and pin the brake on it, tune gas system for suppressed only, and I know going in its not going to shoot like a bolt gun. More of a hunting gun than long range. 1/2 the solution for AR10 issues is to run SR25 style everything and nothing DPMS esp not the stupid buffer!

      It’s tough because look at this gun/article. Tim who we can presume can shoot a gun, has maybe even had precision training, is barely hitting 1MOA on this gun, his fault or the gun?

      Edit: Just wait… This time next year, more 338 and 300mag ARs coming.

  • Chaz Luhrman

    I don’t own a single Lancer product and only have a collector’s interest in black rifles, so I’m not rushing to defend a brand here. That said, if you’re going to post groups, please be more scientific in your data collection, or the presentation of the data needs to be more detailed.