The “Juicer” Shotgun Slug

Juicer1

I had not originally intended to post this video but after seeing it begin to make a semi-regular appearance on social media, I changed my mind. Its appearance was accompanied with the words “Gotta get me some of these!” rather frequently, a statement withdrawn on more than one occasion after the original poster actually viewed the video. So what is making the rounds on social media in the gun world now? It’s the Juicer, and it’s a shotgun slug courtesy of none other than Taofledermaus.

Taofledermaus posting his Juicer video on November 24th and although I noticed it while it was fairly new it didn’t appear in my news feed on Facebook until more than a week had passed. The Juicers were, in the words of Taofledermaus himself: “…some custom CNC’d bi-metal slugs that Tim from Tactical G-Code made on his crazy robot machine. On Facebook it was decided that these would be called “Juicer” slugs.These were 1oz. in weight and had 5 points.”

There have been some unique shotgun loads in Taofledermaus’ history from some with an attempt at stabilization using Q-Tips to others filled with nails – and then there was the one containing a 5.56 round. We all understand the desire to either shoot fun things or shoot things with fun rounds, so it’s no wonder this particular YouTube channel is so popular. Even so I often feel compelled to add the “kids, don’t try this at home” disclaimer. (Have you seen the car-advice memes floating around Facebook? Do they seem like obvious jokes? Well, some people have actually taken that advice to heart, which is why we have disclaimers even when it seems obvious.)

They quite literally resemble a fruit juicer, so the name is apt. Do they work? You’ll have to watch the video to find out.

If you have a YouTube account Taofledermaus is definitely a channel worth subscribing to. Almost always interesting and hey, you know you’ve considered a few of these yourself…



katie.ainsworth

Katie is an avid shooter, hunter, military journalist, and Southern girl. Firearms are her passion whether at the range or on a spot-and-stalk after a big buck. She’s a staff writer at The Firearm Blog and writes about guns, hunting, and the military for various publications both online and in print such as Outdoor Life, Handguns, and Shooting Illustrated. Shoot her a message at ainsworth.kat@usa.com


Advertisement

  • Peewee Sierrafour

    First!

    • JK

      Congratulations. To improve your game, next time try to come up with a somewhat relevant comment. πŸ˜‰

  • 2hotel9

    So, highly inaccurate. Bet DoD hands them a fat contract so they can be issued to US troops. πŸ˜‰

    • Yimmy

      It wouldn’t surprise me under this administration. Anything to bring down the country and take down conservative bastions. Long live the Republic!

  • BattleshipGrey

    Looks like it’d work great in hostage situations. 9 times out of 10 it’ll go right around the hostage and hit the bad guy behind. On the 10th time, it’ll go straight through the hostage and still hit the bad guy.

  • IshTheBuddha

    Would integrating a twist into those fins – or points, whatever he calls them – help accuracy at all? I guess they already had a high rate of spin as it is.

    • Vizzini

      Foster slugs already do that, more or less. Except foster slugs are all “boring” and “proven.”

    • Bronezhilet

      Yes, fin stabilisation needs rotation stabilising as well. Without it fin stabilisation doesn’t work. Look up videos of the 9K115-2 Metis-M, it has the flare for guidance in one of the stabilising fins. You can clearly see that the rocket itself has a pretty agressive spin to it.

      Slapping a few things on a projectile and call them fins isn’t going to work. You need to design and ‘calibrate’ the the fins for its intended flight envelope. I am farily certain this isn’t the case with any of the designs Faofledermaus fired.

      Taofledermaus’ best bet at a semi-decent projectile is using shape stabilisation. The math behind that is fairly easy.

  • MR

    Fun to watch on the high-speed. As I don’t own a high-speed camera, I think I’ll pass.

  • TheNotoriousIUD

    These guys need to go way way way back to the drawing board.

  • Badwolf

    Love it! Perfect for hunting oranges!

  • Kivaari

    So far all the attempts at using finned slugs seem to be flops. Had anyone tried a Forster slug having a heavy nose and a skirt that is twice as long as the traditional? It seems that it would “have to” perform better. With Brenneke slugs having the screwed on wad, I fired them in several shotguns and had the poorest performance of any factory slug I ever shot. Getting a flatter shooting accurate slug from a smooth-bore had remained elusive.

  • Taofledermaus

    We were just happy at least ONE of them hit the target. It went through 12 inches of damp sand without any deformation or damage. (we found the slug a couple weeks later). A lead foster slug will come to a halt in less than 8 inches of sand and flatten out and break apart. The slugs did fly nose-forward, which is half the battle. Many of these experimental rounds will tumble if the balance isn’t right. If you want to see some crazy nice flight characteristics, you should watch the 3D printed (plastic) .70 cal pellets a 15 year old kid made for us. (unless you just enjoy seeing complete failures!)

    • Tassiebush

      I wonder if it might travel in a more stable fashion with some sort of cast plastic casing around it. ideally that would be strong enough to resist air but would shatter/break off on hitting denser matter. Of course it’s got to also survive passing through the bore.

  • markrb

    So, if I fired 10 rounds in 3 seconds with my MKA1919XN, I’d hit the target at least once. Not a very good ratio. BUT….that one hit would be AWESOME!!!

  • Silver Bullet

    I love that! Would like to point out my Native American ancestors even knew something about ballistics. Look at an arrow head and you will see a slope one way on one side and another way on the other side which causes the arrow to spin and stay on trajectory. I dont see any of that on this great round. I wouldnt take but a smidgen of work on the molds to give it the accuracy it needs. PS Im an inventor. I give this to you free of charge…lol

    • 2hotel9

      Actually the shape and contours of a stone arrow head are the result of knapping, not design. It depends on whether you are working right handed or left and the “grain” of the piece you are working with. Know a couple of people who can knapp using either hand, most people can’t do that even if they can knapp at all. And yes, I know guys who use their own hand made arrow heads to hunt. Perfectly normal otherwise, just a little weird.

  • Core

    lol I was going to say aim, but with this projectile aiming is futile..