Big 3 East: DPMS G2 .308

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DPMS/Remington/AAC came out to Big 3 East and they brought out their G2 rifles.

The G2 is the smallest and lightest 308 MSR on the market.  The G2 308 rifle is the same size as a 223 AR but only the magwell is bigger.

The bolt carrier is 20% smaller than a traditional .308 bolt. The BCG is forged monolithic. No ejector fail, according to Dillon Jennings, DPMS Rep. Extractor material usually after 3k-4k rounds will break. They tested 100k rounds and no extractor failure a long as they are made right.

The bolt has three gas rings. Receiver height is the same as 556. So now you can use any aftermarket rail. The R25 GII hunter Remington hunter stock has a super cell pad and the camo is not a dip. It is film that is baked on. Free float on the R25 is molded carbon fiber. On shelf for about $1300 same MSRP as G1.

Lightest weight .308 compact hunter is only 6.9lbs with a 16″ bbl

 

You can see the G2 bolt compared to a normal AR10 bolt.

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Pictures do not do this gun justice until you hold it in your hands and feel the weight and size for yourself.

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Nicholas C

Co-Founder of KRISSTALK forums, an owner’s support group and all things KRISS Vector related. Nick found his passion through competitive shooting while living in NY. He participates in USPSA and 3Gun. He loves all things that shoots and flashlights. Really really bright flashlights.

Any questions please email him at nicholas.c@staff.thefirearmblog.com


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  • Dracon1201

    The G2s are incredible to say the least. The ones I’ve held seem heads and tails above the original pattern.

  • Nicks87

    I love my G2 Recon, its a great all around rifle. My only complaint is that the rifle was really dry when I bought it from Cabelas. I had to soak it in oil to get the action to smooth out. I also replaced the gas block with an adjustable one for running it with a suppressor. Other than that it’s been great and it’s light enough to carry around all day while hunting too.

  • Joshua

    They need to design a way to make it accept 5.56 with a bolt/barrel swap and it would be a killer rifle.

    • SlippedThroughTheCracks

      You do realize that 5.56 is a different caliber than 7.62, right? And that, at a minimum, the barrel would have to be changed as well?

      • Joshua

        Of course, that’s why I said bolt/barrel.

        Bolt/barrel and maybe a different buffer and they could have something really special here.

        • TheNotoriousIUD

          Why not just stick a 556 upper on it?

          • Joshua

            We’ve seen that before. Doing a bolt and barrel only in an AR is new and might be cool.

            Similar to the 5.56 kits the Mk-17 has.

          • Chase

            The lower would not accept 556 mags

    • Kelly Jackson

      You mean like the Colt LE901?

  • Wolfgar

    I would love to see the G2 bolt and BCG in a 6.5 Grendel with a 30 round magazine designed specifically for the Grendel caliber. Strong bolt and reliable magazine are the Grendel’s weakness as are other 7.62X39 conversions from 5.56 designs.

    • ostiariusalpha

      The GII has the perfect barrel tenon size for the Grendel also. I’d be tickled if someone just took an AR-15 and increased the diameter of it’s barrel tenon to the GII’s proportions. Remington had a stepped bolt for the failed .30 RAR rifle they used to sell, it fits perfectly in a standard bolt carrier. Put those two ideas together and you get a lightweight AR-15 that can handle the 6.5 Grendel’s full potential. Add in an LWRC Six8 roomier magwell to help with better geometries on the steel mags and you have the perfect set up for a semi-auto Grendel.

      • Wolfgar

        Yes, that is what I was asking for. Great info ostiariuslpha! Now please somebody make this dream rifle, caliber combination 🙂

      • The Brigadier

        What is the relative merit of shooting a 6.5 Grendel. Heard about a couple of times, but no nothing about it. Can you enlighten us? People have been asking for someone to do this for the 6.8 SPC also. I think it was to less than impressive results.

        • ostiariusalpha

          It’s basically all about the .264 bullets, they’re really at a sweet spot for energy retention and ballistic coefficient to work together remarkably well. They are larger & heavier than .224 bullets though, so you want extra case capacity for the amount of propellant that can get them up to speed; the Grendel solves this for an intermediate cartridge length by using a short, fat case. The difficulty is that the greater the case diameter, the thinner you barrel tenon is going be, and that makes limitations on what kind of pressure the round can operate at. The Grendel case can ideally handle 60,000 psi, but with the AR-15 barrel tenon it’s limited to merely 50,000 psi, and that results in a substantial loss of potential velocity. Some people have tried to skirt the problem by using the .264 bullets in 6.8 SPC cases, such as the 6.5×40 or Six5 wildcats. These have less bolt thrust and tenon issues, but it’s a trade off because they can’t use the longer bullets with high ballistic coefficient that Grendel can and still fit in a STANAG mag. Adding a larger barrel tenon to the AR-15 solves the issue completely, allowing for the Grendel to maximize velocity for it’s longer bullets with a negligible weight increase on the gun.

          • The Brigadier

            Most good ammo is an iterative process. The 7.62 X 51 NATO round took several years to find the right case size and the correct bullet weight. So did the .338 Lapua. They tried hundreds of combinations until one day when all the variables come together. I remember reading about the eureka moment when the team who bought the rifle and the rights from the Swedish company found the magic combination. It took them three or four years of exhaustive studies, and machinists were slaving away every day making different cases and bullets. I’m sure if you can convince some manufacturer with a decent R&D department about the relative merits of the caliber they might spend the millions and the years to develop it. It is not an easy process.

          • ostiariusalpha

            Actually, the Grendel cartridge and chamber went through this very process of successive iterations, with the present round clearly showing the best all-around performance. The cartridge itself doesn’t require any further improvements; even with it’s pressure lowered for the limitations of the AR-15 barrel tenon, it performs more than admirably. Still, for all it’s current capabilities, there is further potential latent within it just waiting for a gun that can fully exploit what it truly has to offer.

  • toms

    These guns have had severe problems. I hope they have fixed the over gassing, excess pressure, bent rims on light loads. and other issues that plague many of the rifles I have seen. This is a rifle I want to love this rifle but cannot at this point. I shouldn’t have to play Dr on a new rifle that costs a grand.

    • Shmoe

      Do you think they’re just problem of execution (i.e. manufacturing issues, construction and workmanship)? Or do you think there are intrinsic flaws in the design? I’m honestly curious.

      • ostiariusalpha

        It’s mostly execution. DPMS is as DPMS does, and it shows in the variability in the quality from gun to gun; sometimes you get the Monday rifle, and sometimes you get the Friday rifle. They do have the tendency towards overgassing, so plan to install an adjustable gas block if you get the urge to pick one up. It helps a lot if you can physically examine the rifle before purchase to check for defects in the workmanship.

      • toms

        They overgassed them and contrary to what the other readers have said, there are many stories of over gassed rifles ripping cases, early extraction, and primer piercing due to pin hole size with pics throughout various forums. My friends problems are not uncommon at all. In fact the DPMS GEN2 is probably the first over 1K rifle a major gun rag has ever labeled as “Not Ready” as they couldn’t get their recon to work even with a gunsmiths help. The recon by the way is not the short gas system either. I think the design could work given better execution but that would require DPMS to change their port size dimensions/buffer spring combos ect. I wish someone a little more reputable in the QC division would take the design and tweek it. Maybe Remington can do it but DPMS is not exactly top shelf stuff or set up for intense QA/QC.

        • Nicks87

          A lot of this is just regurgitated interweb BS. The DPMS hate runs strong with tacticool people who spend way too much money on their rifles.

          • Patrick Karmel Shamsuddoha

            Recoil magazine just wrote an article about both the g2 recon model and the g2 hunter model and they had issues with the recon cycling and they had issues with the tolerance between the firing pin and the hole in the bolt face now those are a published article you find in this months issues on newsstands or in digital download

    • Nicks87

      Could you post some links to examples of some of these problems?

    • JS

      I think saying “severe problems” is a bit of an exageration and is inconsistent with any of the many forum threads/articles/reviews I have read regarding the G2. A couple models (with the shorter carbine length gas) have been hard on the brass (ejector marks) which really only affects reloaders. This is not to say they were unsafe or unreliable.

      • toms

        Stuck cases from rim separation is a your dead problem and pretty serious. Sorry but I think rifles like this should not have these type of problems out of the box. If your ok with having to replace parts on a new gun to get it to work, great. Also, forget about suppressing it unless you like running at the edge of safety. See my post below for more. I like the concept but it needs some work before I would trust my money or life on one.

        • JS

          I have not heard of many issues and they are definitely not common. My Recon runs fine and so have all the ones I’ve seen reviewed. They even seem to already have a much better reputation than the original DPMS .308. I think its a pretty good design!

          • The Brigadier

            It is too small and light for the caliber. AR fanatics are going to ruin the firearm industry if everyone follows them like lemmings.

          • JS

            Too small and light says who?

          • The Brigadier

            Read the reviews about the excessive recoil from the AR10. Heavy and longer barrels serve a purpose. It keeps the recoil down and allows you to sight back on your targets faster. ARs are assault rifles, not battle rifles.

          • JS

            When you say read reviews about “excessive recoil from the AR10″… sounds like you’ve never shot one. It’s a .308 which isn’t bad. The only thing I’ve read is some of the short carbine length systems can be over gassed, which makes the gun hard on brass for reloaders.

  • Shmoe

    I’d be more interested if I was able to get aftermarket components (not accessories), from DPMS also, of course,, but 3rd parties, as well. DPMS’ liberal licensing was the reason their pattern won out against Armalite. Now that Remington,FG own them…well, we’ll see, I guess.

    Other than that, I’m really, really impressed with the design and the concept. Just what was called for.

  • itsmefool

    Actually, the R25 had a baked-on camo pattern in its first iteration…I know, as I bought the first one to show up in my local gun shop when I lived in Montana.

  • Jason Lewis

    I was going to buy the DPMS based on James Yeager’s review. Instead I went with Nutnfancy’s pick. Glad I bought an M&P10 instead. The DPMS felt cheap when I checked it out at the gun store. Yeah that’s not a real test but I didn’t want to spend the cash to find out. This M&P has eaten everything I’ve put in it and is a sub MOA gun.

  • The Brigadier

    Most of the knocks against the AR10 has been about the weight and the light and short barrel that gives excessive recoil. It takes longer to reacquire a target with one than using a M1A or a FAL SR58. How does reducing the weight and barrel length even further going to affect the excessive recoil? Seems to me its going to be even worse and this is just another attempt at trying to turn 7.62 battle rifles into 7.62 assault rifles. There are reasons not to do this and recoil and loss of speed with shorter barrels another one. Its okay for SOCOM, but most of us are never going to infiltrate and shoot up a complex like they do with M1A Scouts.

    Battle rifles are for open field shooting where bigger bore battle rifles excel, and assault rifles are better for house to house fighting where they shine. I wish people with half a brain would quit trying to change battle rifles into assault rifles and visa versa.

    • CommonSense23

      No one in SOCOM is using the M1A Socom. The M1A has nothing to do with US SOCOM.

      • The Brigadier

        Yes they have. Contact Springfield about that. They made the MIA Scout for Special Forces.

        • CommonSense23

          No, no they did not. They are just calling it SOCOM to cash in on the name of Socom for people who do not know better. SOCOM did not go out of their way to buy a 3 minute gun from Springfield, just to throw it into a new stock.