CMMG Mk. 47 Mutant Pricing And Details

76AFC41-2

Our own Alex C has already posted a thorough review of the new CMMG dedicated 7.62×39 AR-15, so be sure to go check that out. Meanwhile, CMMG has released model and pricing details, through a press release:

Fayette, MO (Dec. 1, 2014)-CMMG Inc. today announced the release of the Mk47 MUTANT – an all-new rifle platform that combines the accuracy of the modern sporting rifle and relentless AK47-like reliability with the legendary 7.62x39mm caliber.

Engineered from 7075-T6 billet aluminum, the Mk47 MUTANT features a uniquely designed upper and lower receiver built to manage the dimensions and pressures of the 7.62x39mm tapered cartridge all while keeping the weight of the rifle at a minimum. Remarkably, the Mk47 MUTANT (while unloaded) weighs just over seven pounds.

The Mk47 MUTANT utilizes a unique bolt carrier group derived from the massive AR10 group, which aside from being shortened to a length of eight inches, retains all of the material on the bolt face for added durability and strength.

The lower receiver is designed to accept existing AK magazines, which are widely available, inexpensive and extremely reliable. A standard ambidextrous hook and latch system makes reloading fast and intuitive. The rifle comes with one Magpul PMAG® 30-round AK/AKM MOE® 7.62×39 Magazine.

A full-length Picatinny rail runs atop the Mk47, making it easy to mount your preferred sights or optics. CMMG’s RKM KeyMod™ Hand Guard is exceptionally light and ergonomic. It also gives users the freedom to mount a wide array of accessories using the KeyMod slots found in the 3, 6 and 9 o’clock positions. For accessories that are not yet KeyMod compatible, CMMG offers 5-slot accessory rails.

The Mk47 sports a 16.1″ free floated barrel with a 1:10 twist and runs on the proven carbine-length direct impingement gas system. By effectively maximizing the accuracy and harnessing the knockdown power of the 7.62x39mm, the Mk47 is an ideal rifle for a variety of sporting and defense applications.

The Mk47 MUTANT is available in three different configurations:

CMMG Mk47 MUTANT T:

Caliber: 7.62x39mm
Barrel: 16.1″ medium taper profile
Muzzle: A2 compensator
Hand Guard: CMMG RKM15 KeyMod
Upper Receiver: 7075-T6
Lower Receiver: 7075-T6
Trigger: CMMG Single Stage
Furniture: A4 6-Position Collapsible Stock, A2 Pistol Grip
Weight: 7 pounds (unloaded)
Length: 32.75 inches (stock collapsed)
Magazine: Magpul PMAG® 30 AK/AKM MOE®
MSRP: $1,499.95

CMMG Mk47 MUTANT AKM:

Caliber: 7.62x39mm
Barrel: 16.1″ medium taper profile
Muzzle: CMMG SV Brake
Hand Guard: CMMG RKM15 KeyMod
Upper Receiver: 7075-T6
Lower Receiver: 7075-T6
Trigger: CMMG Single Stage
Furniture: Magpul CTR® Butt Stock, MOE® Pistol Grip
Weight: 7.2 pounds (unloaded)
Length: 33.5 inches (stock collapsed)
Magazine: Magpul PMAG® 30 AK/AKM MOE®
MSRP: $1,649.95

CMMG Mk47 MUTANT AKM2:

Caliber: 7.62x39mm
Barrel: 16.1″ medium taper profile
Muzzle: CMMG SV Brake
Hand Guard: CMMG RKM15 KeyMod
Upper Receiver: 7075-T6
Lower Receiver: 7075-T6
Trigger: Geissele SSA® Two-Stage Trigger
Furniture: Magpul CTR® Butt Stock, MOE® Pistol Grip
Weight: 7.2 pounds (unloaded)
Length: 33.5 inches (stock collapsed)
Magazine: Magpul PMAG® 30 AK/AKM MOE®
MSRP: $1,849.95

CMMG Lifetime Quality Guarantee
CMMG, Inc. will guarantee its products against defects in material or workmanship. CMMG, Inc. will repair, replace or substitute part(s) (at CMMG, Inc. discretion) at no charge to the customer if a defect of material or workmanship is found. All service work must be carried out by CMMG, Inc. The warranty applies to the original purchaser and a copy of the invoice or proof of purchase must be provided when submitting for service or work.

When I first read Alex’s review, I knew price was going to make or break this gun. While $1500 MSRP is more than I think most would be happy to pay for a standard AR-15, I think it’s probably very attractive for a rifle like this in a unique (for AR-15s) but widely available caliber.



Nathaniel F

Nathaniel is a history enthusiast and firearms hobbyist whose primary interest lies in military small arms technological developments beginning with the smokeless powder era. In addition to contributing to The Firearm Blog, he runs 196,800 Revolutions Per Minute, a blog devoted to modern small arms design and theory. He can be reached via email at nathaniel.f@staff.thefirearmblog.com.


Advertisement

  • Giolli Joker

    Price was actually in Alex’ review. 😉
    (well, the “base” model one at least)

  • Havok

    Isn’t the MGI $1,299? And convertible?

  • JumpIf NotZero

    Well, at least they aren’t foolishly trying to use the AR15 bolt like other goofballs. With the base size of the x39 that’s a sure fire way to get a broken bolt head. So good on them there…

    But really, why? It’s not like x39 is so much cheaper than 556, it’s not like there aren’t truely well designed and tested options for modern x39 carbines. I suppose this could be cheaper than other options, but I’ll never understand people who seek out a firearm based on price vs the role the gun should fill.

    • Although I think it’s a neat gun, I don’t really see the attraction to 7.62×39. I picked up a CZ 527 in .223, for instance. 😉

      • JumpIf NotZero

        I got it when it was less than 10 cents a round… now, not so much.

  • Michael R. Zupcak

    “Relentless AK reliability” without a piston system? Rather have a 556xi or Galil or 3 AK’s.

    • A piston is not necessary for excellent reliability.

      • Jeremy Star

        No, but I bet cleaning this is not as easy as a piston rifle.

        • The majority of gas blowback in any gun comes from residual gas pressure from the chamber.

          And AR-15s run fine when dirty, anyway. 😉

  • Chijen

    What’s the advantage over a $500 AK??

    • You can quad-mount night vision devices at the 12, 3, 6, and 9 o’clock positions, for, um, hog hunting.

      It’s a neat rifle, but I think many people would choose an AK instead.

    • Ethan

      Because its modular and shares parts with the AR-15.. oh wait, no that’s not it.
      Because it operates just like an AR… no, that’s not it either.
      Because it has all the advantages of the AK platfor.. dangit that’s definitely not it.
      Because its an affordable niche gun?

      Truly I have no idea. I really don’t understand all these companies that have come out with guns in excess of $1,200 that offer little to no serious advances over a standard AR or AK platform. Different ≠ Better. Different = Different.

      Cool idea, but as in terms of capturing market shares this thing will swim like a lead Christmas tree decorated with boat anchors.

  • Dr. Daniel Jackson

    I would rather have a SIG 556 Russian or just a regular AK I don’t really trust direct impingement.

    • Jeremy Star

      1 – I agree with the provision that it’s not that I don’t trust DI, I just like pistons more.

      2 – Please come back to TV! I miss Stargate. 😉

      • Dr. Daniel Jackson

        I wish Stargate would go however,I am not the actor who played Daniel Jackson,he just happens to be my favorite Stargate SG-1 character.(Teal’c being a close second)

        • Jeremy Star

          I kind of got that, but thanks for clarifying anyway. 😉

    • USMC03Vet

      Not having trust in DI is about as absurd as not having trust in vaccines.

      • Dr. Daniel Jackson

        Trusting in vaccines is foolish they are used for population control,Bill Gates even said thats what he wants vaccines to be used for,considering he is the richest man he could easily have that done if it isn’t being done already.
        There are plenty of reasons not to trust DI,a DI weapon can’t go 1,000 without any cleaning or oil/lube,that makes it an inferior gas system than others.

    • SM

      While I have no issues with direct impingement, I just found my new object of desire: The Sig 556 Russian.

      • Unfortunately, I don’t think those rifles work very well.

        • SM

          One can dream.

  • G2

    Cool gun but at that price point not so much. Maybe after they recoup their development costs and the price drops sub $1K I would think about one. Until then I’d rather put that much money towards a SCAR or Tavor.

  • Adam aka eddie d.

    Of course the AR platform provides a lot of (useful) luxury,
    all sorts of stocks, handguards etc. , and it solves the long standing
    problem of the AK, the dustcover-top rail issue, but I have my doubts about the DI system.

    A lot of guys are probably sighing right now – no, I don’t think there’s any problem with the reliability of direct impingement. Half of the (modern) world is using AR derived guns for a reason. (Well, actually a lot of reasons, but most of it is politics.)

    My problem’s with ammunition and cleaning:
    let’s face it, most guys use surplus ammo for AKs, quite understandable.

    As a regular Jonh Doe who lives from a salary,
    would you buy expensive newly manufactured 7.62×39 ammo
    while you can still get military bulk for dirt cheap prices (compared to new stuff) ?

    I mean come on.

    Considering this, maintenance comes to mind.

    If you’re shooting surplus, you’ll clean your gun more.

    A piston system keeps that crap in the front, a DI doesn’t, evidently.
    Of course you’ll have to do regular cleaning on a piston gun too,
    but it’ll keep most of the crap in the front.

    CMMG is known for their piston guns, I just can’t unerstand why they went with DI.

    • MAS 49s use DI and shot corrosive ammo all day long when they were in service. So while I could imagine problems occurring by mixing corrosive ammo with a gun not designed to use it, I don’t really think that has much to do with whether the gun is piston or DI.

      • Adam aka eddie d.

        Thanks for the info Nathaniel!

        I was coming from more of a convenience standpoint.

        I don’t think a DI would be unreliable with low quality/old surplus either,
        it’s just the fact the gun will get a lot of gunk on the bolt c. group and
        the guts of the gun in general.
        Though a lot of residue if left unattended could cause problems on the long run, either tolerance and/or corrosion related.
        But I’m not an engineer, maybe these aren’t serious issues.

        If I could get my hands on one of these, I’d personally feel more comfortable with a piston system on it.
        Other than that, it really looks like a well designed, great gun, I like it.

  • Aye! Those are nice guns!