H&K417 (HK762A1) Impressions

I shot the new consumer 7.62mm HK762A1 (H&K417) for the first time at Media Day. There were so many people queuing to shoot it I only got to shoot about 7 rounds. I fired those 7 rounds off as fast as possible (as I usually do) and it felt good. It is heavy, like all AR-10 rifles, but the weight helps soak up the recoil. The handguard is shorter than I would like it. A lighter but longer handguard would be preferable in my opinion. H&K is considering offering a full length rail as an aftermarket accessory. Below are photos of the guy who was ahead of me in the queue to shoot the gun …



Steve Johnson

Founder and Dictator-In-Chief of TFB. A passionate gun owner, a shooting enthusiast and totally tacti-uncool. Favorite first date location: any gun range. Steve can be contacted here.


Advertisement

  • James

    How, does this compare to other .308 battle rifles?

    I do like HK, but I dont think this is worth $4000. Or barely half that.

    • Flounder

      3000 is about right for a very well put together precision AR-10. 4000 is definitely custom built AR-10 range.

      Sooo I think your right about this being WAY overpriced but I think it could easily go for about 2500. Freakin HK hating on civilians

      • Leonard

        It costs about 2500 € in Germany. So I guess with exchange rate, shipping, export and import costs you end up with such a price in excess of 3000 $.
        Note that 1500 – 2500 € is about the normal price for a high quality semi-auto-rifle in Germany, only budget versions from no-name firms and Russian/East European import rifles are much cheaper. And much inferior in quality.

      • W

        2500 is a perfectly reasonable cost for this rifle, though i am willing to bet it will be way more expensive.

    • W

      how does it compare? it is my opinion that there are better battle rifles for the money. That goes without saying that the MR762 is a fine rifle, just like the 556 (and 416) are also outstanding rifles.

      Considering the technical features of the SCAR 17 and what you get for your buck, i am sold on the design and would never consider investing any more money on a gas piston AR10.

  • Aurelien

    The G28 DMR rifle is available for the Bundeswehr with half and full length railed handguard.
    Maybe this will be reproduced in the civilian market.

    • Gregor

      I spoke to a HK representive at the Shot Show and they really are thinking about releasing some of the G28 parts as accessoires for the MR762. He especially mentioned the long handguard.

      And as for the weight: Try hold the G28 in compersion to the MR762 – its nearly entirely made out of steel. The fully loaded G28 must weight the same as the british L115A3 (AWM in .338) – I would hate to be the marksman to have to carry the G28 around 🙂

  • Leonard

    A fellow member in my rifle club has the German version of this (called MR308 in reference to the .308 calibre) since 2010, and it is a very nice piece of hardware. Highly accurate out to 300 m (unfortunately we have no longer range available…). The price might hurt at first, but will pay off in the long run through superior quality and precision.

  • cc19

    I’m glad Hk has brought this platform to the US fairly unchanged. Hopefully they can do a US G36 right next, because you won’t find me spending thousands to convert the SL8 into something it should have been in the first place.

    • W

      The reasons for comparatively unchanged MR556 and MR762 is because production of civilian variants is inside the United States. Hopefully this will result in a G36 being produced as well (its not completely out of the ball park).

  • W

    im curious to know what the real price will be for this rifle.

    I know a PWS mk 216 is 2,500~
    LWRC REPR 3,100 ~
    SCAR 17 3,000~
    POF P308 2,500~

    A little researched revealed the price of some of the few MR762 rifles and they are in the 6,000 range.

    Considering I can get a SCAR 17 for 2,800 used, which is technically much superior to a gas piston AR10 design, i could not justify spending over that much for a MR762.

    • Nater

      You can get a SCAR-17S for $2,800 new.

      • W

        yeah those are approximate prices. I have seen a used scar for that much (albeit lightly with less than 100 rounds), though not a new. Im not shocked however.

    • jdun1911

      $6000 for a rifle that does less than other in the market. You have to go full retard buy 417at that price. At $6000 you’re nearing .50 caliber range.

      • W

        Well, if money is not a issue, and one wanted a particular rifle bad enough, then i guess it could be justified. I couldn’t justify it myself. I remain empathetic to a collector’s point of view. btw, a guy/gal with enough money to throw down for a rifle like this, logically, would be anything but a retard LOL 😉 but i know what you mean.

      • mosinman

        you’d get more use out of the hk for practical puposes but if you go with the .50 you get more bang for the buck(no pun intended) i would personally pick the .50 because you get more proformance for your money.

      • John Doe

        If you’re buying a $6,000 rifle, regardless of caliber, I think you would have money to throw around, and you could probably afford a $6,000 AR-10. Just my two cents.

      • jdun1911

        Why would I want to throw down good money for an overweight overprice .308 AR?

        I could spend that money on a Larue OBR, nice glass, a DSLR camera, ammo, magazine, suppressor, and probably enough money left to hire a female model to pose next to the rifle.

        If I’m going to spend that much money, it going to be either a heavy customized firearm or a .50 rifle.

      • W

        I couldnt justify spending that much unless you are hellbent on acquiring a HK 417. I could justify this, although most cannot.

        I cant argue with jdun on the Larue. I would personally prefer one from Lewis Machine and Tool, though if i was looking to buy a AR10 and had to pick between the two, i would flip a quarter.

  • Mgregg85@gmail.com

    Nice to see that H und K prices are still completely ridiculous.

  • JMD

    I would much rather have an Larue Tactical OBR, and this thing makes the OBR look inexpensive by comparison.

    I’m sure the MR762 and variants thereof are good, but are they good enough to justify that price? I’m not convinced. If someone can make an argument on behalf of H&K’s rifle, I’m willing to listen…

  • jdun1911

    Over weight and over price design. For God sake drill more holes on the handguard!

  • G3Ken

    Bottom line is Heckler & Koch is in business to make money. Their business model must be working, so they charge what they do. If people don’t like them for it, it’s understandable. I’d love a Ferrari, but can’t afford one. A lesser priced performance car will get the job done. Think Ferrari gives a crap what I think? Doubt H&K care what we think either. They’re making plenty of dough and there are enough rich, fat folks out there that will buy ’em and make them safe queens.

    • W

      absolutely right. all companies are there to make money. regardless of what certain political leaning groups of our population think, companies are not obligated to provide jobs, are not obligated to charge “deserving” prices for products, and are not obligated to make people happy. They are companies and that is how it works in a free enterprise system.

      H&K shouldn’t give a crap what joe smith thinks any more than Ferrari or Microsoft, etc, etc. Its not about how nice your company is. its the system it has in place to sell a product and maximize profits.

      • G3Ken

        Seems like people don’t like what we have to say, but I think it’s because they don’t like the way taht Heckler & Koch thumbs their nose at the civilian market. I know where they’re coming from. I would love to be able to buy reasonably (read fair) priced products from them. As a matter of fact, if their products were reasonably priced, I would likely never buy a firearm from another manufacturer with the exception of a shotgun. I could live out my remaining days with my G3K and add an MP-5, a USP, the 416, the aforementioned 7.62 and a P7M13 (always loved the quirky P7). Just can’t afford all of those, so it’s a Bushmaster, 1911, M1A and a host of others.

        I know why people have a hard-on for H7K and part of me agrees, but I understand business as well and H&K’s bread is buttered on the military market.

      • W

        “Seems like people don’t like what we have to say, but I think it’s because they don’t like the way taht Heckler & Koch thumbs their nose at the civilian market.”

        I would say that’s the main reason. I honestly don’t care that people didn’t like what i had to say; this is the reality of capitalism. As a entrepreneur, I am not a charity, I am a business. H&K is also a business. Tough s–t, grow up.

        “I know where they’re coming from. I would love to be able to buy reasonably (read fair) priced products from them. As a matter of fact, if their products were reasonably priced, I would likely never buy a firearm from another manufacturer with the exception of a shotgun.”

        I agree too. H&K is expensive, though you are still exchanging currency for a premium product. It absolutely amazes me that people gripe about the price of a H&K handgun, though not a single soul complains about the price of a premium 1911, which has the advantage of abundant parts, tooling, and production when compared to a H&K. It’s a simple case of whiners with a double standard.

        “I could live out my remaining days with my G3K and add an MP-5, a USP, the 416, the aforementioned 7.62 and a P7M13 (always loved the quirky P7). Just can’t afford all of those, so it’s a Bushmaster, 1911, M1A and a host of others.”

        I am a proud owner of fifteen different H&K products, but also have a good abundance of other comparable firearms.

        “I know why people have a hard-on for H7K and part of me agrees, but I understand business as well and H&K’s bread is buttered on the military market.”

        Absolutely. H&K is focused on military contracts, though is rapidly expanding its civilian firearms production. It is my opinion that if you want a H&K, then save your pennies for a H&K. People have a hard-on for H&K because a company with a high reputation is bound to create a slew of counter culture types. These anti-conformists absolutely relish the idea of tearing down a company’s reputation out of envy and jealousy. Every popular corporation/company/business has enemies…most of them absolutely unjustifiable in their childish behavior.

      • I don’t understand all the “don’t like” comments when you’re basically give a plug to the merits of capitalism. I didn’t think the majority of Americans would buy into this current Administrations class warfare and hate the rich campaign, but perhaps I am wrong??

        H&K is NOT obligated to sell their product at a price that we can all afford. I don’t begrudge the man who makes enough to purchase fine firearms like this without having to take out a second mortgage. The American way is not for all of us to have equal stuff. What makes America great is that we each have the OPPORTUNITY.

      • 276 pedersen

        If companies want to make money, it might be to their advantage to not blow off potential customers who then buy from their competitors. But I guess the real issue is that you just want to say “tough s–t grow up” and sound tough.

      • W

        “If companies want to make money, it might be to their advantage to not blow off potential customers who then buy from their competitors. But I guess the real issue is that you just want to say “tough s–t grow up” and sound tough.

        The point is that I never disagreed with the idea of listening to customer input. It certainly helps companies avoid trends in stagnation and lack of innovation to adapt to competitors. Be that as it may be, companies are not “obligated” to listed to anybody but the people that own them.

        If you like collectivist, centralized economies, then don’t reside in the United States. The “people” do not own corporations…they are owned by private individual/s. Living in a capitalist country is a two-edged sword. I mentioned the features of corporations but will bring up the fact that people that don’t like certain businesses can take their currency somewhere else. Its great to live in america! So when i say “tough s–t, grow up” that is exactly what I mean; if you hate it so much, start your own firearms company instead of whining.

  • jagersmith

    Not ALL AR10/SR25 rifles are heavy.
    The JP Enterprise LRP07 is very light, as is the Larue PredataAR. They can be configured to 7-7.75 lbs, versus 9.94 lbs for the HK.

  • William C.

    Regardless of what you may think of H&K, that is a damn sexy looking weapon.

    For that sums of money we are talking about I would rather go with the Colt SP901 however.

    • jdun1911

      Personally I think it look horrible. The stock and pistol grip are ugly and don’t get me started on the handguard. HK made this rifle as cheap as possible while pricing it as much as possible.

  • G3Ken

    Love the Schmidt & Bender optics that top off that rifle. Just wouldn’t be right with some POS optics plopped on top of it. I see that too often, someone with a fine rifle with a scope they bought on special at Wal-Mart. Your firearm is only as good as its weakest part.

  • MW3

    Wow! Sick gun.. wish I could try it lol

  • DrDG

    There is nothing cheap about the feel of this weapon. It might be lots of other things (too late to the party, too heavy, too expensive), but cheaply built it is not. Even the odd looking pistol grip feels very nice, and is supremely comfortable. The fit and finish is the best I’ve ever seen in any AR pattern rifle, bar none. Loved it. That said, I’ll keep my SCAR 17S.

  • mike knox

    Why’s there a live round on the floor in the 1st picture?

    • jdun1911

      Drop off the table? Does it matter? It’s not going to hurt anyone.

      It typical to see live rounds on the ground in outdoor range. At my outdoor range we just pick it up when we see them and throw them into the open fire.

      As a rule of thumb there are always live rounds on the ground in any range. It not something to get overly excited about.

      • mike knox

        An open fire? You’re joking right? That’s the last place to dispose loose rounds, unless you’re retarded.

        Loose rounds are often a hazard, especially if they’re hangfires and they can hurt you. It’s just range discipline. Loose rounds always have to be accounted for and put away.

        If it’s a rule of thumb for you, then you’re better off not having a range of your own. It’s that sort of carelessness and negligence that get people harmed. And in your case, tells everyone you’re stupid.

        I was just pointing out a lack of range discipline in a big event for firearms where safety’s supposed to be a prime concern..

      • jdun1911

        I assume you have very little experience in firearms and shooting firearms to make that kind of statement. Don’t post what you don’t understand.

        It is common to see loose rounds in range. They are harmless. I have never seen one go off when it is out of the gun. Even if it does it will not harm you. Unlike the movies and TV, real life have to follow the law of physics.

        In our area it is standard procedure to dump bad live rounds into open fire (oil can) for disposal. Or put it on the bad round bin. The range master sooner or later will start a fire and throw all those rounds into it.

        With that said it is a very very bad idea to pick up a live round on the ground that doesn’t belong to you or have no knowledge of in your gun.

      • mike knox

        Really? Still insisting with an open fire? Especially when it’s labelled in the packaging to keep away from an open fire. How much more for disposing in an open fire.

        With that sort of lackhanded knowledge, that pretty much puts you down with your assumption. Hangfires do inflict injury when neglected, that’s why they’re noted in firearms manuals and ammo packages. It’s a simple fact.

        You really get me laughing with your “range master sooner or later will start a fire and throw all those rounds into it” bit. Unless that idiot “range master” is you. It pretty much makes sense.

        Bad rounds are second struck, taken apart, punctured or disposed by damp pits or soaked, but never burned. Even if they’re disposed in a burn pit, it’s done in a dirt well with embers or hot ash and covered.

        But if you insist with an opern fire or just leave them around on the floor, have fun picking brass and copper off your legs and feet along with everyone else’s and have your range permit revoked. Good luck gummo..

      • jdun1911

        This is what happen modern society cannot tell between reality and fantasy. This is what happen when our public school system fail our children.

        Fantasy do not follow the laws of physics. Reality do.

        Disposing ammo in open fire has been done long before our great grandfather was alive. It’s normal.

        In order to understand why it perfectly safe to throw live ammo in open fire you need to know basic physics that is taught in Jr. High School. You also need to know how gas react to the environment.

        Gases fill space in every direction. What happen when gases is release in open space? It dissipated. What happen when gases is release in an enclosed environment. It built pressure and wants to escape. I don’t think I need to explain it anymore. I think you get the idea.

        I remember a long time ago, I asked the range master to lit a fire on the oil trash can to get my hands warm up. One of the shooters told the range master that he dump some live rounds into the trash can. The range master started the fire and the guy went into total shock.

        You know what’s the common cause of injuries at the range? HOT BRASS. I have my share of getting hit by hot brass. Smelling my own flesh burn is NOT FUN. Talking about it cause phantom pains right now.

      • mike knox

        In other words you’ve never heard of hangfire and brass injuries. Even in the ‘time of our great-grandfathers’ it was already a bad idea to burn bad ammo in a fire, epecially when brass was more useful getting recycled and propellants burst hard instead of burning slow.

        That gas diffusion excert of yours is moot. Setting off high combustibles like propellants is done in an enclosed buffered space to avoid blast trauma and fragmentation.

        Your story however just doesent click into reality, or just plain sense. First it was lighting an oil can, then it became a trash can, then there’s a guy going into shock. A made up story by the looks of it.

        Pretty obvious how you start making things up when you start your first reply with guesswork and follow with assumption..

  • John Doe

    How much is the HK556? I decided that my .300 AAC build has got to be gas piston. What’s a good, less expensive gas-piston AR?

    On YouTube, the HK416 seems to run pretty well on .300 AAC. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhhSc-Pq24o

    • W

      The H&K MR556 is about 2700 give or take. If you want a lower priced alternative, there is the Primary Weapons Systems Mk 114 and 116 chambered in the 300 black out for $1650 http://primaryweapons.com/store/pc/viewPrd.asp?idproduct=311&idcategory=15

      The reason why i bring up PWS is because they uniquely employ a long stroke gas piston system, which, in my educated opinion, is superior for the AR15 platform than short stroke piston systems. I have nothing but good things to say about my 5.56 version. PWS makes a outstanding product.

      LWRC also has gas piston 300 blackout variants.

    • mike knox

      Marginally 3 Grand, It’s been posted on this blog: http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2010/02/03/hk-hk556-pricing-revealed/

      But if you shop overseas, an HK416 costs almost double for the unit alone, not counting the Legal entaglement.