Taser XREP Up Close (and pricing!)

taser_xrep-tfb-tm

The Taser XREP is a 12 gauge less-lethal round that delivers an electric shock to the target it hits. It’s certainty the most complex shotgun bullet ever made and also the most expensive.

I was able to handle, and photograph, a deactivated Taser XREP round. I have never before seen any photos published, other than the official Taser marketing photos, so this is a first.

The cartridge on the right is the unfired round. It can only be fired in a Mossberg X12 shotgun (and regular 12 gauge rounds can’t be fired in the X12) It can be fired from any 12 gauge shotgun although Taser recommend the Mossberg X12 which cannot fire regular legal rounds (preventing tragic accidents). The X12 is a modified version of the pump action Mossberg 500.

The bullet as it looks when it leaves the muzzle is second from the right in the above photo. At the base you can see the fins which help stabilize the bullet. The spikes in front are electrodes.

Once the spikes make contact with the target, the body breaks away and very (very!) sharp needles are deployed. The Taser system requires two points of contact to adequacy shock a human being. The frontal spikes provide one point of contact and the needles provide another.

Taser XREP training round (right)

The XREP is a very complex device and expected it would be expensive, although I had not idea how expensive it would be!

The training round, a plastic projectile weighted the same as the live XREP costs $100 per five rounds! The live version of the XREP costs $800 per 5 rounds! That is $160 per round! I would hate to miss the target at a price that that!

Mossberg / Taser X12 shotgun.
Related

Steve Johnson

Founder and Dictator-In-Chief of TFB. A passionate gun owner, a shooting enthusiast and totally tacti-uncool. Favorite first date location: any gun range. Steve can be contacted here.


More In: Shotguns


Advertisement

  • viper5552

    Not 12 gauge compatible, AND $160. Utter-madness seems to be spewing forth from SHOT show

    • http://www.thefirearmblog.com Steve

      “Not 12 gauge compatible”

      ^^^ That is a feature!

  • Chris P

    No matter how they dress it up, I’m still against the whole taser concept. If you’re prepared to fire a shot at a fellow human being, you’d better have a good reason for doing so, and you’d better be prepared for the consequences (ie, if you’re not prepared to kill your target you shouldn’t be taking the shot in the first place). It seems to me that all too often these kinds of devices are used as a first resort, when they should really only be used as a last resort as opposed to firing a conventional projectile. I’m actually really glad that these shells cost so much; hopefully the cost will discourage an otherwise gung-ho member of law enforcement from using these indiscriminately.

  • SpudGun

    I frist saw one of these on the TV show ‘Heroes’ and thought it was typical Hollywood until I found out, it was real.

    Like Chris P above, I too have my misgivings about Taser style weapons, especially if used as a first resort or as a torture device. But I’d rather be hit in the chest by a ‘shocky dart’ then a load of buckshot.

    ‘Not 12 gauge compatible’ is a definite feature as you don’t want some rookie flatfoot getting his rounds mixed up and accidentally putting a deer slug through a drunk mother of four live on COPS.

    • http://www.thefirearmblog.com Steve

      I think that idea that Tasers can be used as a torture device is over rated. Surely a taser puncture marks (from the needles) and burning on the skin is easily documented by a suspects laywers.

  • Matt Groom

    Personally, I think this is just plain idiotic. If the situation warrants pointing a Shotgun at someone, and they are not dissuaded from their actions by this very threatening act, then the next step is OBVIOUSLY lethal force. If you point a gun at someone, and they are not deterred enough to comply with verbal directions, whether it’s “Give me your wallet!” or “Put your hands over your head!”, they are insane.

  • Lurker

    You know tons of police departments will be adding this to their Homeland Security Christmas List this year.

  • Lurker

    @Steve

    You should subscribe to http://waronguns.blogspot.com/ and read about all of the cases of police officers tasing people. It’s not every day, but it is more frequent than one would think.

  • JKEverett

    I remember seeing this somewhere on T.V. a while back…the History Channel maybe?

    Regardless – less-lethal weapon systems are great, they can save lives and make the job of law enforcement just that much easier. Trouble is, and I think most would agree, is that the system is being used as a first response to non-compliance or mildly threatening behavior. There are plenty of other options available before a taser should be deployed, many of which are not exercised.

    Products are great – application still needs work.

  • FiveOh

    “It can only be fired in a Mossberg X12 shotgun”

    Wrong. It can be fired from ANY 12 gauge shotgun.

    The Mossberg X12 has been adapted as a special purpose gun to only shoot that particular cartridge to reduce chances of mixing regular and less-lethal rounds.

    • http://www.thefirearmblog.com Steve

      FiveOh, thanks for the info. You are correct.

  • FiveOh

    A brief follow-up from my last post, straight from the Taser website:

    “• Can be fired from any 12-gauge pump-action shotgun”

  • Bora

    Sounds like a good way to rid big-city PD’s off a few million bucks every year.

  • Aurelien

    So you need to buy the shotgun, Mossberg only, then buy expensive taser shells. And the shotgun cant even fire live rounds when needed. So technically your squad car needs to have 2 shotguns and a rifle.
    That is a stupid concept.

    Tasers are being used the wrong way, but this one is just plain illogical.

  • Sian

    that much, AND you need to buy a special shotgun for it? So much for that being a neat idea. Too bad really.

  • CMathews

    Any idea of the range on the round? Or output voltage?

  • zach

    Chris, It’s all about the use of force continuum. And I’d certainly rather be hit by a Taser than a nightstick.

  • Erwos

    Gonna disagree on that one, Chris P. The reason you need to think hard about shooting someone isn’t because there’s some mystical significance to shooting someone, but because of the consequences to the stakeholders involved. By changing those consequences, you’ve changed the “shoot no-shoot” equation.

    However, I’m going to agree that these really need to be 12gauge compatible. I see the liability reasons for doing otherwise (“oops, that wasn’t a taser after all!”), but it’d be far more useful as a drop-in replacement.

  • Carl

    Putting these electro-shock tools in form factors that resemble firearms will result in tragedies. LEO has already and will continue to kill people due to getting trigger happy and confusing the Taser with the firearm.

    I suspect the shotgun and shell is non-standard simply because Taser don’t want ordinary people to have these tools. This is also probably why the price is so high. Government officials couldn’t care less how much money they spend. Because the money being spent isn’t theirs. It seems quite unlikely that LEO will hesitate to fire because he is concerned about the cost to the taxpayers.

  • Clodboy

    I agree that tasers are overused, though I disagree with the statement that “if you’re not prepared to kill your target you shouldn’t be taking the shot in the first place”. Correctly used, a taser can be used to take out offenders who may pose a danger to others through no fault of their own (say a misdiagnosed bipolar guy who’s gone manic because of the wrong meds) or who need to be saved from themselves (ex. a suicidal guy threatening to blow out his brains in public). Even for people who probably deserve a walloping (ex. violent drunks), the tazer is the preferable solution, both for the offender and the cop.

    What needs to be drilled into people’s heads is that “LESS lethal” does not equal “NON lethal”, because that tends to further translate into “NOT REALLY violence” which further translates to “the quick and easy way to instantly enforce cooperation in ANY situation”.

    And in this case, the fact that you’re firing a very large projectile at your target (albeit at slow speeds) means an additional risk for permanent injury or even death – as evidenced by the Boston college girl killed by a hit in the eye from an FN 303 launcher (which has a muzzle energy of a measly 25 ft-lbs)

  • olabid

    Anyone know if this mode of delivery and platform offer any significant advantage over a conventional compressed gas deployed taser a la x26/m26?
    Given the significant increase in cost, complexity and specialized equipment hopefully it does; otherwise this seems like another “gee whiz” solution in search of a question.

  • Alan

    Wait, $800, per 5 rounds? Does that include the damn shotgun?!
    An X26 taser can be gotten for that price, and a new 590 for less than $400. WTF man.

  • Henry Bowman

    “‘Not 12 gauge compatible’ is a definite feature as you don’t want some rookie flatfoot getting his rounds mixed up and accidentally putting a deer slug through a drunk mother of four live on COPS.”

    No, he’ll just mix up his guns to do it… like that California female rookie who drew her Glock on a guy sleeping in his own car instead of her Taser.

  • Andrew

    Sure, if the ranged mode was used. The “handgun” tazer model has a touch mode, one that doesn’t actually fire the darts. That means no puncture marks, and no burns.

  • zach

    Matt, apparently you’ve never heard of hallucinogenics.

  • El Duderino

    “Don’t tase me, bro.”

    But seriously, that’s a huge delivery platform for a taser round. If there is a foreseen problem with mixing rounds, why not a single-shot break-open pistol? Or making it 11 or, better yet, 13 gauge bore-size. Sure it’s proprietary, but Tazer knows something about that already…

    Until they make heat-seeking shoulder-fired taser rockets that Mirandize the perp through a small speaker — not interested :)

  • Clint

    Would YOU want to wrestle an ex-con who may or may not have a knife?

    The force continuum is like this:
    verbal-taser-baton-gun

    Would you prefer:
    verbal-baton-BATON-gun?

    The rule is simple, when under arrest you either get handcuffed or hurt. What would you choose taser or baton? I choose the taser.

    Mace, OC, etc doesn’t work well on drugged out perps. And it can be used for torture as well

  • Clint

    As for the torture thing, that comes from people much like the anti-gunners. It COULD be used by bad guys so it should be outlaws, etc.

    I knew a guy that used wires and a 6 volt lantern battery to shock himself “for laughs.” If someone is going to torture me with DC they can just get a car battery.

    This parallels NYC and the campaign against “gun paint” like Duracoat? Anyone can buy a can of regular spray paint. So why demonize Duracoat?

    Now let us go back to talking about the (overPRICED) gear…

  • Aurelien

    “Mace, OC, etc doesn’t work well on drugged out perps. And it can be used for torture as well”

    Well an ex-cop friend was attacked by an intoxicated suspect after he shot the guy with a rubber round from a shotgun. The guy did not even move an inch, he just got pissed and attacked.
    In those situations the taser is a solution – it just shuts down the muscles.

    But the taser systems are not being used like they should, sometimes cops taser first and talk after…

    Often this is due to the officer being a little trigger happy, but whatever the weapon he will end up shooting (or hitting) the perp when not needed.

  • SpudGun

    @Clint, if the cops were just using Tasers to take down drugged up perps, then I’d be cool with that. But too often they’re being used as a way of achieving instant compliance with argumentative suspects, many of whom have committed a totally non-violent crime.

    Your force continuum argument shouldn’t really apply when someone refuses to sign for a speeding ticket or calls a cop a bad name.

    The ‘torture thing’ is well documented on an international scale with many dubious foreign governments buying Tasers for just that purpose. In fact, the British Police who use Tasers have trouble getting them repaired in the US because the UK Government rules on the import / export of torture devices.

    JKEverett’s post above summed it up succintly.

  • Matt Groom

    Zach,

    Do you believe that if you ingest mind-altering drugs that you are not responsible for your actions? “I only beat my wife when I drink. It’s a disease! I can’t help myself!”

    People are responsible for their actions. If they take hallucinogenics and pose a threat to themselves or others and are unable, or unwilling, to take verbal commands after they pose a threat, they should be neutralized.

    Clint,

    If the perp isn’t a threat, they should not get tasered, ever. If they are a threat, then any action taken to make them comply should be considered reasonable, even if it results in extreme injury or death of the threat. Baton to the head, bullet to the chest, etc. Tasering does NOT seem to enter into the equation as a reasonable means of the execution of justifiable force. If the technology had existed, they would have used Tasers on Ghandi and MLK Jr., which is unacceptable. Peaceful protesters who passively refuse to comply with verbal commands given by law enforcement should NEVER be forced to comply with orders. The very existence of this technology strikes me as an affront to the first amendment.

    If two citizens have an altercation, and it’s verbal, neither would be justified in using a Taser to achieve control over the situation. If it became a physical altercation, and the aggressor was shot and killed by the other citizen, then in a free state, that would be considered self-defense. The defending citizen would NOT be required to use an electronic submission device, then a blunt force instrument, then a firearm. The same standard which are applied to the reasonable use of deadly force for a normal citizen (you will note that I’m not calling them “Civilians”) should be applied to a member of law enforcement.

  • Lurker

    I saw a video, I believe from Oakland, Ca, where the officer seemed to have confused his Glock with his Taser and shot a handcuffed suspect in the back with the Glock. The suspect was handcuffed, laying on his stomach, not seeming to resist, yet the officer was ready to taze him.

    There are all kinds of stories of cops being attacked by drug crazed loonies, etc, but quite frankly, there are too many of cops tasing people who are not aggressive or violent, and end up being shot with a real gun instead of a taser.

    Furthermore, a taser is more than the U.S. Government is allowed to use on terrorists, yet it is perfectly okay to use them on American Citizens.

  • Mikee

    Sometimes, the perpetrator is wanted alive, to provide information. Say there is a terrorist being apprehended, and he runs. The police/FBI/CIA/DIA can stop him without all those messy holes buckshot makes, and the interrogation can start immediately.

    There are people who deserve to die that need to remain alive until their usefulness is over.

  • Carl

    A baton is very unlikely to be confused with a firearm, so I’d prefer to be subdued with that rather than a Taser. That is assuming I would resist arrest in the first place of course, which I wouldn’t.

    I predict the gun-like Tasers will eventually be abolished by the police when more people get killed because of mix-ups.

  • Vak

    Well, I guess it is related to the whole less-lethal debate :

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UrlSqDe-_-Q

    Why not use net guns ? They are TRULY non lethal (well, unless you try to eat it or something), can even catch two criminals at once, and making one that could be fired in a 40mm “grenade” launcher (like the swiss LL06) would make them usable in riot control situations, along with teargas or rubber batons.

    link related : http://world.guns.ru/grenade/gl35-e.htm it’s the LL06, it doesn’t look too big and could be easily slung over the shoulder.

  • Clint

    Matt Groom said:
    If the perp isn’t a threat, they should not get tasered, ever.

    While I really would LIKE to agree with you Matt, I can’t.

    Remember “Don’t Tase me, Bro!”

    The cops had few options. They either let the guy go, beat him, mace him, break his arms, or tase him.

    Please explain how the police could have dealt with that case in a non-violent, non-taser AND effective manner.

    Remember, if tasers did not exist, we would be discussing nightsticks and mace.

    It comes down to either Handcuffs or Hurt. And that is the only way it can be because the dirtbags (and many decent people) would never allow themselves to be handcuffed. I wish I could live in a world where, IF I was arrested, I could tell the cops “No need for the shackles” and then politely walk to the squad car, calmly ride in the back as the cops drive to the station and then quietly wait for the lawyer. (of course, I know I didn’t do anything wrong, but that’s irrelevant.)

    The point being people submit to handcuffs (and Arrest) only because of the threat of greater consequences.

    It is much like mortgages. If you don’t pay your mortgage the bank forecloses. If they do not foreclose, then nobody else will pay they mortgage. If you resist arrest, you get hurt. If you wouldn’t get hurt, why not resist?

    Yes there are abuses, but that does not mean we should take the opposite extreme and place tasers at, or near, the level of firearms. Guns are for threats, tasers are for compliance.

    Saying “Please” does not always work .

    I do NOT like it. But this is the world we live in.

  • Carl

    Remember “Don’t Tase me, Bro!”

    The cops had few options. They either let the guy go, beat him, mace him, break his arms, or tase him.

    Please explain how the police could have dealt with that case in a non-violent, non-taser AND effective manner.

    If you have (legitimately) taken people into custody and they refuse to walk you cuff their hands and feet together and carry them away. Call for backup or a stretcher if needed. If attacked by bystanders then by all means defend yourself against them. If you are outnumbered leave and return later with backup.

    But inflicting pain on people in your custody who aren’t aggressive or threatening is not cool.

    Furthermore, a police officer is hardly qualified to determine whether a suspect is intentionally refusing to walk or actually incapacitated.

  • Matt Groom

    The “Don’t Tase me Bro!” guy was there to make a scene and to make John Kerry look like a fool and a hypocrite, which he acheived. He was not violent, he was not threatening, he was not verbally abusive, and he did not need to “comply”. He had every right to be there.

    If they are not a threat, they do not deserve forced pain compliance. If two police officers walk up, one with handcuffs, and the other with a baton, and they say: “You have two choices…” and he chooses to resist arrest with physical action, that’s a threat. Beat his ass with the stick. Too extreme? Stop arresting people for being nuisances. We live in a digital age. If the person is creating a disturbance, record their actions, and inform them that they will be fined and prosecuted for failure to comply with the rules of civility and restraint.

    If after they are cuffed, they use passive resistance and have to be carried away, charge them with resisting arrest. If they have to be forced to comply after they’re handcuffed, trying to bite the officer or something, and have to be subdued with a baton because they wig out, charge them with resisting arrest.

    If they’re refusing to walk, or too inebriated to walk, then either way, pain is not the answer to their resistance. Check their blood alcohol, etc., when the paramedics arrive. That way, if they have massive head trauma that occurred before the officers arrived that prevents them from walking, they don’t die in the back of the squad car. Sending 10,000 volts through and intoxicated, injured, or insurgent individual is not a good idea.

  • Sian

    @Carl

    The Oakland BART cop saying he confused his sidearm for his taser is BS, and either himself or his department coaching him and trying to cover their asses for what was more likely inadequate training on simple trigger discipline. A Taser and Sig Sauer .40 feel nothing alike in the hand, simply put, it’s all but impossible to make that mistake. A cop who has trouble with trigger control can be retrained. One who can’t tell the difference between a sidearm and a taser needs to be fired and put in a job where he has much less responsibility.

    Regardless, the suspect was under control at the time and even tasing at that point would not have been justified.

  • Carl

    Sian, well, I for one would not want to carry both a pistol and a pistol-shaped Taser. Regardless of what happened in any specific incident the potential for confusion in a stressful situation seems too high.

    Maybe if they built them significantly different than a firearm. Lose the pistol grip for starters.

    A cop that fails at gun safety should get fired immediately, without exception. Retraining? Come on, they should know this stuff before they start working.

    Mistaking one pistol-shaped object for another seems like a lot more honest mistake to me though.

  • Clint

    “and they refuse to walk you cuff their hands and feet together”

    The guy in that case (and others) had locked his arms out in such a way where the cops COULD NOT handcuff him without a high risk of injury to the suspect. A taser shock beats a broken shoulder joint.

    Matt, it sounds like your position is the cops should either let people walk or else be beaten profusely. Am I mistaken?

    The cops don’t write the laws, but they have to enforce them. And being a nuisance is illegal. Take on the system but do not blame cops for doing their job. Especially when they have limited resources and often, too few cops for any given area.

    Also, we are mostly pro-gun here, so we should know more than others that misbehavior should be blamed on the people misusing items and never on the objects themselves.

  • Clint

    “they do not deserve forced pain compliance”

    I am wondering if this is the real issue. That you disapprove of a “COMPLY-COMPLY” style police state. If that is the case then taser use is a non-issue. You should direct your efforts at the disease (the abusive politicians) and not at the symptoms (specific equipment).

    You can ban tasers all you want, but unless you remove the underling problem, the result will simply be people getting nightstick beatings as a form of “pain compliance.” Hell people will be beating fro any reason whatsoever. But if you remove the cause (totalitarianism), then you have no reason the remove tasers.

    Sound familiar?

    • Steven Kent

      Don’t people understand that “pain compliance” is and always will be used by law enforcement? They HAVE to. You can’t just say, “no officer, you can’t arrest me.” Police are trained in various methods of “pain compliance” that are less likely to cause any lasting injury. Before that, you got a billy club to the head. Sorry, but if your STUPID enough to resist arrest maybe you should be happy they are using pressure points and joint manipulation technices or tasers instead of beating you with a club.

  • subase

    When in doubt tase, sounds good to me.

    And tasers are useful for kidnapping people, so that is a plus.

  • Matt Groom

    Clint,

    I’m not blaming cops, I’m sticking up for cops. Several of my friends in Law Enforcement, including my father, all complain about having to be the nannies of civil society. Getting called out because junior won’t eat his vegetables, getting called out because someone locked their keys in the car, getting called out because the neighbor is playing his music too loud, but hasn’t been asked to turn the music down. Petty shit. Stupid shit. Some people deserve to be beaten, but just because the cops are there does not mean that a crime has been committed.

    I am also resistant to the idea that cops HAVE to enforce EVERY LAW, especially unconstitutional laws. And when the choose to enforce a specific law, no matter how inane or illogical the law, no amount of force is considered excessive. Use of a Taser is not less force than the use of a baton, believe it. Yeah, it won’t dislocate a shoulder, but it can stop a heart or cause a stroke, or kill you in some other way. People have been killed by being tasered from the standing position and hitting their head when they fell over. Great danger lies in the notion that it’s okay to hurt people if they disagree with the authorities, and an even greater danger lies in the notion that when someone is killed by these things, it’s just an accident. It’s as intentional as emptying a magazine into a perp because he refused to leave an auditorium during a political event.

    Remember the Spider Man thing? “With great power, comes great responsibility.” But with great responsibility comes DISCRETION. If they aren’t violent, take their picture, and let them walk. Being tasered is no different than being beaten, its just more politically acceptable, and that needs to change AND QUICK.

    I agree the problem is politicians, but allowing Police culture to decay into “It’s not my fault, I don’t have a choice” is no better. Police officers are not automatons. Remember Robocop? The whole premise behind the movie was the creation of robot cops who didn’t complain, didn’t go on strike, and could be programed to ignore abuses by their corporate masters. And it didn’t work, because their best product still had a soul, even after his mind was erased. Real cops are real people, and they have real minds that can and should conflict with orders which are contrary to the good of society, regardless of the laws passed by a rogue political class.

  • Mike V

    A few points of clarification:
    – There are 2 versions of the XREP round. 1 works in any 12ga round, 1 in the Mossberg X-12 only.
    – The effective range on the XREP round is 15-100 feet.
    – Yes it is expensive, but Taser has miniaturized the components of an X model Taser into a package the size of a large sugar cube. That level of technology isn’t cheap.

  • Alan Lowey

    XREP shells are a god-send for hunting ‘things with wings’ or nightbirds as I like to call them. The UFO phenomenon could be revealed to be due to real-life night-flying ‘monsters’ imo! If the beasts are paralysed in mid-flight, then it stands to reason that they would hit the ground and brake their necks! Hoorah!

  • PokeyJoe

    I would love to have this as the 1st shell in a shotgun designed for home defense. 1st shot gets the 1st guys attention and 20 seconds to let him know the next round is live ammo if still wants to pose a threat and/or take out anyone else stupid enough to have come in with him and not run off after hearing a shotgun blast and guy # 1′s screams of pain.

    I hope you people understand why an unloaded weapon is worse than no weapon at all, when the situation arrises to protect your home. Consider that I have a 4 year old son. That leaves me with policing my home defense weapon from my young child. This, by nature, adds nessecary delay if I need to use it. Now, consider that a curious child that plays with toy guns, gets a hold of your real shotgun, God forbid, and accidentally fires it, wouldn’t you feel a little more at ease if the first round out was not going to kill your child, your wife, yourself, or your neighbor? Geeze you people are kill crazy and blind to the advantages this has in the realm of home defense for those with small children. And I would never recomend any other load out for home defense than one of these following a string of very usefull deadly rounds.

    I would gladly pay the $160 to load in my shotgun.

  • http://valley-technicalservices.com Tren Doney

    What I have seen is that many of the South American countries that have banned fire arms have recently passed a law allowing Stun Guns to be carried by police and civilians.

    The X12 would give a great advantage for law enforcement in those areas. Although in America $160 per round might sound cheap but in another country it could be too high of a cost.

    Very interested in seeing what China version they are going to create to compete with this :) Hopefully Mossberg didnt paten the bullet design preventing anyone from making a cheaper round!

  • Gary Sellars

    Steve’s remark, “I think that idea that Tasers can be used as a torture device is over rated. Surely a taser puncture marks (from the needles) and burning on the skin is easily documented by a suspects laywers.”
    is, very unfortunately, ignorant of the facts of too much police behavior.

    I suggest that Steve, along with all others who tend to lean towards his perspective, spend an hour or so looking at some of the YouTube examples of police brutality. There are, to be sure, some examples that are falsely labeled, but there are more than enough which will shock and anger you. There ARE bullies and unstable men wearing police uniforms and pretending it isn’t so helps nothing and no one.

    Get the facts. Unedited police station video and dash cams, which are abundant on YouTube, are quite telling. Police brutality is a shame to law enforcement and a crime.

    Recognizing our need for police and law enforcement, it would be nice to think that police brutality is an aberration that can be attributed to a few bad cops who need to be fired. Unfortunately, even when the police video evidence proves it unquestionably, it is still denied most of the time by the authorities. That fact unfortunately demonstrates a mindset of “it’s us against them” rather than an aberration and shows a level of criminality, or “we’re above the law” that is the norm for police departments where this behavior is denied.

    I grew up with respect for authority and considered a career in law enforcement. Learning that this behavior is accepted so frequently, justified by what is, in essence, a psychotic evaluation that “we’re the good guys,” I realized that my love for justice and equity would not allow success in law enforcement.

    To the willingly naive, pretentious and yes, even psychotic, that sounds like disrespect for authority, but is, in fact and in truth, respect for authority but a contempt for those who abuse their authority and pretend that they are “above the law.”

    It’s grievous to see how often this is and is why I’m thankful for tasers. Better an abusive cop use a taser than murder someone and lie that he was “forced to do so.” YouTube has one police cam where a police officer murders a man by firing three times into his back with his firearm. The man was wielding a knife but he was moving slowly and could have easily been shot in the leg(s). You might be one who says, “When a man wants to commit suicide_by_cop, then let the cop oblige him,” but that’s not the official police policy in any jurisdiction with which I’m familiar.

    • http://n/a paul

      It is obvious that you have never worked as a peace officer and do not know the laws regarding use of force, both citizen and poicemen While I mean no personal disrespect, please refrain from making comments on issues of which you do not have any knowledge. Our readers may not know what is “Gospel” and what is not; bad advice leading serious legal peril as well as grave bodily injury/ death. There is no requirement to give opinions/ advice; please save postings for topics which acurate information can be offered. I hope this comes across as constructive and not condescending; my intention is to help, not hurt.

  • http://www.wholesaledefenseonline.com/ Alex

    Any updates on the pricing of these rounds? Surely they must have come down a bit since then. Or maybe not, has anyone noticed the change that Taser made to their Gold and Platinum packages with regards to the additional cartridges?