Utility & Simplicity Personified: Stevens 301 Single-Shot

Stevens 301

Stevens, under the Savage Arms family, has a simplistic, new single-shot shotgun they would like to announce to the world: the Stevens 301. Nothing we have not seen before, but affordability and utility are always a great find in any firearm model and this offers both.

It features a traditional black synthetic stock which is perfect for any firearm that is going to be hunted. The synthetic stock will naturally show less wear if it is abused or hunted hard. The single hammer and break-action tab by the receiver are all intuitive pieces for any shotgun user. Savage Arms will be immediately offering the Stevens 301 in both standard and compact models.

Stevens 301 Single-Shot Shotgun

  • 12 Gauge, 26″ Barrel, 5.59 Lbs, 13 3/4″ LOP
  • 20 Gauge, 26″ Barrel, 5.59 Lbs, 13 3/4″ LOP
  • .410 Gauge, 26″ Barrel, 5.59 Lbs, 13 3/4″ LOP
  • Youth 20 Gauge, 22″ Barrel, 5.34 Lbs, 12 3/4″ LOP
  • Youth .410 Gauge, 22″ Barrel, (Weight & LOP Unspecified at this Time)

Savage Arms went on to further detail their newest shotgun addition to the Stevens brand:

Stevens by Savage Arms is pleased to offer practical hunters more performance from the trusted single-shot, break-action shotgun platform with the rugged and reliable new Stevens 301. Shipments of these firearms are currently being delivered to dealers.

The Stevens 301 features a crisp, reliable break action and rugged, modern synthetic stock that withstands even brutal abuse afield. It is available in .410, as well as 12- and 20-gauge models.

The MSRP of all of the Stevens 301 variations is currently set at $173. You should likely see brick ‘n mortar pricing around $150-$160.

Stevens 301

Stevens 301

Stevens 301



The outdoors, fitness and anything related to firearms are my passions. I am a S&W Armorer, Glock Armorer, reloader and am coping with an addiction to classic S&W and Colt revolvers (by buying more revolvers). I’ve been a guest writer for Sierra Bullets and love long walks to the gun range.


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  • iksnilol

    40mm version when ?

    • Giolli Joker

      Wait for Ed Hubel to put his hands on it and we’ll get close.

  • mosinman

    Made In China?

    • PK

      Yes.

      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/c70a89e0815d88cac985b645a1a66f76d36271dcffd35b5c58fc32ceca1f85ba.png

      Sun City Machinery Co., LTD, P.(eople’s) R.(epublic of) C.(hina) is right on the barrel.

      • mosinman

        cut me some slack, i just got home from work

        • PK

          No offense was intended – this photo is a small part I cropped from a large picture on Savage’s website, as all of the announcements somehow “forget” to mention where it’s made.

          • mosinman

            maybe you should write the articles lol

      • Matt O

        Well that sucks, I was just thinking up an excuse to tell the wife when I saw your pic. Thanks for saving me the trouble of finding that after I bought it

        • PK

          No kidding, I was initially getting ready to buy one of each. First there’s only a few gauges, but the deal killer is the origin. I wouldn’t want it for $100, even.

          • Aguywhoknows

            Why is the origin a problem for you guys? Most of our IT-stuff is from china, and you complain about a rough, mechanical piece of hardware?
            I mean, I can understand if we complain about bad quality, of course, but even american made products sometimes lack quality.
            Just sayin…

          • PK

            I prefer to support companies based in and employing people from the country in which I live.

          • iksnilol

            Like Springfield?

            Just sayin’, that’s a commie like attitude. What part of free market is hard to understand?

          • PK

            Oh, by all means, if people want to buy them that’s just fine by me, I’m all about having more options on the market. I’m sure they’re perfectly adequate replacements for the NEF/H&R lineup.

            My personal preference is to buy items made in the USA, feel free to buy whatever you’d like if these are imported to where you live.

          • RocketScientist

            Not trying to be argumentative, or snarky or anything… honest question. How do you manage that in today’s global economy? I mean 99% of electronics (phones, appliances, TVs, computers, related hardware/peripherals etc) aren’t made in the US, do you just bite your tongue and deal with the fact that your phone/PC are made in China/overseas? Similarly for a LOT of other manufactured goods of all kinds… America’s economy is predominantly a service economy, we do very little manufacture/production these days. Is it a hard and fast rule with you? Or just a “i do the best i can” sort of thing?

          • PK

            I manage it as I can, yes. I buy local, shop at employee owned stores, and do the best I can. In today’s world, as you point out, it’s impossible to live a modern life and only buy local.

            That means that when I have a choice, I buy the USA made version. For something like this shotgun, I’ll continue to look at used H&R/NEF models rather than buy the import.

          • DangerousClown

            Not trying to be snarky (honestly, I have never have to try), but I wonder how that works with cars? Fords are made in Mexico and Canada. Toyotas and even Honda motorcycles are made in the US. So does someone choose to support the executives and shareholders (foreign manufacture of US brands), or the workers who build them (US manufacture of foreign brands)?

          • PK

            Again, I manage the best I can. My personal preference runs toward Toyota, as employees can (and do) hold stock, and the majority of the work is done in the USA.

          • PersonCommenting

            As far as electronics I try and at least buy American Designed stuff and or assembled like apple products. I know they make them over seas but at least the high paying jobs are mostly over here. With computers I just cant. I dont think apple makes a superior device for the money. So I go with other brands that are probably entirely designed else where.

          • DangerousClown

            We do make the best (Darn Tough) socks in the world. But we have to use Italian-made knitting machines.

          • Swarf

            That is a true statement. At least about Darn Tough being the best.

            Kind of weird to have a strong opinion on socks, I know, but they’re that good.

            And they back it up with a lifetime guarantee, one that they actually honor, according to my concrete worker brother.

          • DangerousClown

            It’s not weird. American-made socks that keep your feet dry, stink-free, and automatically regulate your feet’s temperature is something to have a strong opinion about.

          • mazkact

            I had to turn fifty to realize that quality socks and underwear are important. Only Wigwam socks for me.

          • DangerousClown

            Merino wool makes all the difference.

          • MeaCulpa

            Naaa, my mom’s (welll I did prefer my grandmother’s but as she isn’t around) home knitted socks rule supreme. For work/hiking followed by woolpower liner+sock and for dress socks Bresciani.

          • PersonCommenting

            Read above, he said he tries to buy the US option when available.

          • mazkact

            Springfield Armory, the oldest name in U.S firearms made in Brazil and Croatia. Great guns disingenuous marketing.
            For me the thing about these Stevens shotguns is that (I believe all new Stevens shotguns are made in China) like Springfield the marketing is disingenuous. Also these break open guns look like the receivers are made of “pot” metal, don’t think I’ll be trying one.

          • DangerousClown

            Then you’ll need to give up your phone and computer. And the internet. And all your devices that connect to it.

          • PK

            Read the other response, friend. I do what I can, that’s all. I understand it’s a losing battle, but I have to at least try. Who knows, one day maybe we’ll see more countries with domestic production of electronics, instead of just one massive producer.

          • PersonCommenting

            I agree, I like supporting locals too. For the first time I see someone admitting that the products arent garbage. I appreciate your honesty and you sticking with what you believe.

            I love the comments that bash chinese crap which yeah there is crap but US makes a lot of crap too. You buy something from china at a comparable price to a US item and it will work the same if not better.

            Thanks for your honesty and supporting US businesses.

          • John

            But our guns are AMERICAN, dammit! ALL OF THEM! AND THAT WILL NEVER CHANGE!!!

            /eagle sheds a tear

          • iksnilol

            Especially the Springfield XD!

          • Paul Rain

            Make them in a free country then.

          • Hyok Kim

            “but even american made products sometimes lack quality.
            Just sayin…”

            Yes, true enough, the difference is at least in U.S. people on average try to produce decent stuff, in China, they don’t even try, unless a big brother in the form of independent QA is over their shoulder. SONY stuff made in China are just as high quality as SONY made in Japan, but SONY does their own QA, they don’t leave it to the locals.

            The same with other quality brands that does outsource in China, QA is never outsourced.

          • J.T.

            Yep. Being made in China they should be significantly cheaper than the old H&R/NEF guns were, not the same price.

          • Brett baker

            Ain’t the 90’s guys. Chinese wages have increased in the last 2 decades. The dollar has lost value against the yuan. They’re even occasionally enforcing environmental regs. Also, the cheapest H&3rd had fixed chokes.

          • PersonCommenting

            To be fair yaun has fallen a good deal in the last year or so. All the same they are paying a lot more to their workers. They dont need child labor anymore. Most of the workers are above 16 these days. Yeah still child here but adolescence was invented like 50 years ago so who cares what the west thinks.

        • Captain Obvious

          Well, cheap is cheap and gazillions of people buy CCC (cheap Chinese Crap) at Walmart and dollar stores simply because it’s cheap. I am surprised however that no one has brought out a 26″ OAL short barrel smooth bore single shot “firearm”. The unregulated kind. A birdshead grip 20 gauge single with a short barrel would be a great walk in the woods gun.

          • PersonCommenting

            While we dont have the vast quantity of it but the US makes a lot of cheap crap as well. Again may not be as cheap and prolific as chinese crap but we have our fair share.

      • Blake

        Fender Guitars has a fairly unique way of branding/marketing their stuff. It’s not printed in bold on the glossies or anything, but the product lines (to folks that know their guitars) are basically:

        China
        Korea
        Mexico
        Japan
        USA

        (not necessarily in that order but pretty close)

        Not every product is made in every factory of course (& different products are made in various factories from year-to-year), but for their basic instruments (Strat, Tele, J-Bass, P-Bass, etc.) that’s pretty much the lineup.

        I think this is a win-win for them because the design of the product is the same, it’s just the components & origin that change (& the resulting build quality/fit & finish). “Cheap-n-cheerful”, “Made in USA”, & a few notches in between are all available & they all sell like hotcakes.

        I guess this is sort of the same thing with e.g. Savage/Stevens but it’s really a part of the Fender product DNA.

        • PK

          Interesting, I didn’t realize that! Being that I live pretty close to Gibson, I tend to look at their guitars first.

        • PersonCommenting

          Dont Mexican Fenders have an M in the serial number? Also I would rather buy from mexico than china. At least that helps me and people closer to me somewhat.

    • HenryV

      Yes. The place where they make iPhones.

  • PK

    Once again talking about the 301? It’s from China. No thanks, not at that price.

    • Jason Culligan

      What’s wrong with Chinese guns? I’ve got a Norinco JW25 and paid €300 for it. It has handled thousands of rounds and shoots as good as a CZ 455 which is at least €100 more expensive.

      • PK

        In my experience with Chinese-made firearms in general, absolutely nothing is wrong with them. Pull the trigger, they go bang safely and can be quite accurate. It’s just my preference to buy local.

        • Jason Culligan

          Where I live, buying local means paying through your teeth for German or Belgian guns. Norinco is pretty much one of the only companies in my market that offers AR-15’s for around the €1,000 price range. Almost everything else is starting from €2,000.

          • PK

            It sounds like it makes good sense for you to shop for mass-market guns such as Norinco, then! That’s absolutely terrible. I hope economic pressure doesn’t push you to entirely abandon local items, that would be a very strange situation indeed.

    • Robert Preston

      If its made by Norinco, there might be a chance it will be made with 5100 series steel, which is better than the steels used in guns made elsewhere.

      The strongest built 1911’s are the Norinco made units due to that steel. Stronger than Colt, Kimber, Remington, or ANY of the top dollar 1911’s.

      • PK

        While an interesting note, there is no reason to use stronger steel in a single shot break action shotgun like this. If it were made to be substantially lighter while retaining a proper margin of safety, it would matter that the steel is of a different grade than the usual.

        Since it’s still made to be the same size/weight as the NEF/H&R, what’s the point in using different materials?

  • Brett baker

    I can get Mexican-American Maverick pump for $169.99 on sale around here in November.

    • Single shot shotguns are remarkably useful and great guns to teach basic safety with. You’ve hit the nail on the head, I think, as to why we don’t see more of them.

      Now if they could just produce single shot rifles at the same price point….

    • iksnilol

      Meh, a good single shot 20 gauge is a brutal harvesting machine. Weighs nothing, so you don’t get fatigued and thus your hit rate is hella high even after being in the boonies for a while and starving.

      • Any opinions on the compact (22″) length barrel vs. 26″?

        • iksnilol

          Longer barrel would make it easier to aim… though short barrel is shorter to carry. I’d say it’s individual preference. I’d go for the shorter personally.

        • ostiariusalpha

          There’s virtually no velocity advantage to a 26″ barrel, and unless you’re a competition shooter, you aren’t going to need the enhanced accuracy of the longer sight radius; this type of single shot is no skeet gun anyway.

        • Tassiebush

          The different barrel lengths don’t really matter for velocity. It’s about 25fps per inch of barrel but there’s more variation than that between pellets in the same cartridge. Where it does matter more is how well the gun fits you and points. The stock is particularly relevant in this regard and a long barrel helps too. 26″ is quite short for a hunting shotgun in a single barrel or double probably comparable to a 20″ repeating shotgun. But sometimes with guns like this the biggest benefit is that they are light and easy to take along. If I wanted a gun in case I saw game for the pot but generally it was to be out of the way I’d go compact but if I wanted a light gun for hunting I’d go for the 26″ and that would probably be for the stock fit over other factors.

          • iksnilol

            Yeah, I think the 25-50 fps per inch is for rifles. Shotties, I’ve seen data that they cut down from 28 inches to 10 and the difference was 10% velocity. And we all know that most of the energy from a shotgun comes from the mass and not the “high” velocity they’ve got.

  • grouse

    Still waiting for a redux of the Stevens 220. Hammerless single shot with a tang safety.

  • Paul White

    how do these compare to the old H&R single shots?

    • PK

      At a glance, they appear to be a fairly direct knock-off with the addition of a safety. Pin placement, machine marks… they may be made on the same jigs, using the same cast dimensions, to pretty much the same specs.

      I’m sure they’re fine, honestly it’s difficult to screw up a single shot break action firearm in such low pressure cartridges.

      • J.T.

        It’s just to bad these are made in China.

        • Jason Culligan

          Nothing wrong with a Chinese made gun. You get some lemons of course but Norinco is generally functional and cheap compared to its competitors.

  • Will

    I inherited my uncles old Stevens single shot shotgun.
    I never realized what a tough man he was until I shot it, ONCE, it kicks like a mule!!
    I cleaned it. Put it back in the safe where it resides to this day.

    • .45

      Without knowing exactly how it feels for you to shoot your grandfather’s shotgun, I might suggest that it could have something to do with the stock design. Never thought it would make much difference, but the high comb of my one and only 20 gauge single shot seems to transfer half the recoil into my face, resulting in a wonderful headache after a few shots. I stuck it out the one time I shot it and fired numerous rounds through it, but it will be my 12 gauge single shots from here on out. I bought the 20 gauge specifically because I thought it would be less punishing than a 12 gauge…

      • Joshua

        yeah, stock geometry has more impact on felt recoil than the gauge does

    • Tassiebush

      That could be about stock dimensions. I also wonder what load you used? I had a single barrel Stirling “poachers” gun that weighed about 5 1/2lbs that was a bit of a kicker but certainly bearable. My current hunting shotgun is an under over that’s apparently 6.2lbs and I find that perfectly comfortable but I’m using 2 3/4″ shells with 32 to 36gram loads normally.

  • Dr. Longfellow Buchenrad

    An exposed hammer break action doesnt need a safety. Ill keep my H&R I got for $70 at a pawn shop.

    • OldHand241

      Yeah. I really miss that Iver Johnson 20g I got for my 10th b’day. A break-action single shot, it had an automatic ejector, which occasionally allowed me two shots at a flight of dove. With an external hammer, it surely didn’t need an extra “safety” lever.

      • Dr. Longfellow Buchenrad

        I havent timed myself, but Id guess Im at about 1.5 seconds between shots with my stock cuff shell carrier.

        A while back I took part in a just-for-fun 3 gun shoot and the shotgun I was using jammed mid stage so I finished with my H&R. It was quite fun.

  • .45

    Hmmmm… I own half a dozen single shot shotguns ranging in price from $150 on the high end before I realized how overpriced that was, to down around $45 when I figured out the best places to buy in my neck of the woods. Gonna have to do better than a plastic stock and a safety to compete with $45…

  • Sunshine_Shooter

    Wake me up when a 10 gauge version surfaces.

    • Anonymoose

      Hamburger shoulder.

    • PK

      No kidding… I wish I had bought a lot more of the 10ga NEF/H&R single shots than I did.

  • Martin Buck

    Sold in NZ under the Norinco label. Much higher price here, but then everything is. Pity our incomes don’t match our high costs.

    • Brett baker

      We Yanks Don’t have a VAT.

      • Martin Buck

        For that you should fall down in thanks. VAT (called GST here) is another con designed by rich people to make the poor pay more tax, while they again take advantage of all the loopholes. For NZ prices, just double the US dollars that you pay. I have two Norinco rifles, they are great value. A simple singel shot is quite tempting.

  • Ace of Lances

    Hopefully it’s better than the Turkish singles we’ve got access to in Canada; Khan & friends..got a .410 Khan single for my daughter, the forearm screw broke and forearm fell off after the first slug went through. Nice integrated picatinny rail, but crappy furniture. Be nice to have new heavy barrelled Cooey style singles with wood stocks. Surely a Yankee / Canadian company can make them and make a profit at $250/$300 a pop ($150USD)

    • Joshua

      I think your off on your conversion, $150 CAD is $188 USD right now.

      • PK

        $150 CAD is about $120 USD. 1 CAD = 0.797667 USD as of 7/22/2017.

        • Joshua

          sorry, tired and brain fart, reverse the tags. $150 USD = $188CAD

        • Joshua

          important thing is that we aren’t at $0.50 a dollar which was what OP seemed to be saying

  • Joshua

    proof reading when?

  • Edeco

    Single shot pistol please. I don’t go googly-eyed for break action like I do for falling/rolling block, but for <$200 if it let me be doing 357 out of a 11" hose…

  • AZgunner

    I’ve got an old single shot break action Winchester youth 20 gauge. Love it, it was a gift from a family friend when I was a kid.

  • ToddB

    So they bought the H&R patents? Sure looks like an H&R with a Rossi safety added in. Now if they started making rifles like H&R and we could get barrels for them, might be onto something.

    • Paul White

      yeah, I miss decent but inexpensive single shot rifles being an option; the Thompsons are nice but damn are they pricey. And I forget who made the ones I saw recently, but they were utterly crappy feeling.

      • mazkact

        Rossis are pretty craptastic. I like the CVA line of single shot break open rifles.I bought a CVA Hunter for my grandson and it shoots great, he killed his first deer with it.

  • PersonCommenting

    Better have ejectors instead of an extractor. I have an old Stephens that shoots that shell out of there.

    • .45

      I am amused at how vigoriously my single shots will chuck the shell out. A bit startling the first time you hold it at a bad angle and get whacked in the face though. ;D

      • PersonCommenting

        I wish more double barrels did this. Side By Sides.

  • Klaus Von Schmitto

    I got a 410 on my 5th birthday. It was a bolt action but I have no idea what kind. My dad and I hunted rabbits with it down the fence line of our farm. About 1968 dad loaned it to an uncle who took it to Thailand during the war and it was stolen. I haven’t had a 410 since but I think I’m going to get one of these.

  • Anon. E Maus

    I think one of these in some pistol and rifle calibers, along with a scope rail, would make for a very good budget rifle.

    I’m picturing 9mm Luger, .357 Magnum, .223 Remington, 7.62x39mm and .308 Winchester

    It’d pretty much never be able to break, ammunition would be common and cheap, and it’d be a suitable hunting, foraging and target rifle for poor people.

    • .45

      I’m curious though, how does one do that without rimmed cartridges? I know it can and has been done, but how well does it really work?

  • John Daniels

    Cool. Now duplicate the rest of the extinct H&R lineup, including all the classic rifle cartridges and a duplicate of the old Buffalo Classic.

    • #The Deplorable Boogur T. Wang

      and nobody mentions the ‘Old” Topper .410.

  • Joseph Jacobs

    Please make pistol caliber barrels for the 301.

  • Mark York

    How about a 28ga?

  • Rick Stroup

    I have a “White Powder Wonder” that is ancient (close to 70 years old) but in comparison is nearly identical except for the safety and the choke tube. The comment about “Never seen before” could only have been submitted by a blind person.

  • darrell_b8

    NEF is now made by ‘Stevens’?? My young son, killed a lot of dove b1rds with his SS 20 ga. Safe and reliable; he’s a wiz at sporting clays today….but switched to a very nice Beretta.

  • Mark Ri

    I picked mine up yesterday. 12 gauge, comes in two pieces, easy to put together. I ordered it last week after reading some reviews.
    It is very similar to an H&R style shotgun. I won’t get to shoot it until tomorrow night at trap but, it seems to be a very tight nicely put together gun. $170 out the door.

  • Hyok Kim

    Where is it made?