Ruger Rolls Out Uncommon Calibers in their GP100 & Redhawk

We are officially less than a month away from SHOT Show now and the new models for 2017 continue to roll in. Ruger recently announced two new caliber offerings in their GP100 and Redhawk line of revolvers. Although it is not uncommon to see revolvers chambered in .44 Special or .357 Magnum nowadays, it is less common in these specific models. The beefier frame of the GP100 plays host to the new .44 Special while the Redhawk downgrades from its typical .44 Magnum caliber to .357 Magnum.


Ruger GP100 .44 Special – MSRP $829

RedhawkWhile this new GP100 model looks like many we have seen before it does offer some unique features.

  • Fiber Optic Front Sight
  • Unfluted Cylinder
  • Hogue Monogrip

Fiber optic sights continue to grow in popularity for many shooters. Also, most indoor ranges are, ironically, not well lit near the firing line. Fiber optic sights also help outdoors on cloudy days and older shooters greatly appreciate how they draw your eyes in. The Hogue Monogrip is a departure from the ergonomic grip typical with GP100 revolvers. Finally, the unfluted cylinder adds to the rigidity, weight, and style of the new GP100. A nice touch for a 3″ revolver.


Ruger Redhawk .357 Magnum – MSRP $1,079

RedhawkRuger offers their Redhawk and Super Redhawk in quite a few calibers varying from .41 Remington Magnum to .480 Ruger, but this is the first standard model .357 Magnum.

The 8-shot, unfluted cylinder will be the first thing most people notice. When you pack in 8 rounds of any caliber into a revolver you begin to feel a little Dirty Harry-like!

On a more sensible level, the larger capacity means less reloads and more range fun. Speaking of reloads, this Redhawk has its cylinder relieved for moon clips and Ruger includes 3 with each firearm. Visually, the stainless steel finish matched with hardwood grips gives this model a clean, attractive look.


Ruger has been pumping out quite a few new firearms prior to the arrival of SHOT Show. Be sure to be on the lookout for more new offerings the closer we get to SHOT Show!



Hello everyone! The outdoors, Crossfit, and anything firearm related have always been my passions. I’ve been a guest writer for Sierra Bullets, am a Smith & Wesson Armorer, reloader, and have an addiction to classic S&W and Colt revolvers. Be sure to visit TFB frequently and keep your magazines full, my friends!


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  • gordon

    I had been interested in a high capacity .357 Redhawk for sometime, but my barrel length minimum for such rounds is 3″ and I prefer 4″ or longer to take more advantage of the round. It is just my opinion but I think sub 3″ magnums are more bothersome than helpful.

    • Tim

      I agree. I would like to see it in 3″, 4″, and 6″.

      It’s still a neat gun and i love all things chambered in .357.

    • BattleshipGrey

      I’m guessing they’ll come out with longer barrels later, but they wanted to catch the concealed carry market first. I’d like to see a 5″ barrel myself.

  • Harry’s Holsters

    The Redhawk is one of my favorite guns of all times. 8 rounds of 38 makes for fun reasonably cost effective shooting! I can’t wait!

    • iksnilol

      *cough* Taurus and S&W have already been doing it for years *cough*

      • Swarf

        So, the more affordable brand no one trusts and the over-priced brand with the internal lock everyone hates and no one trusts?

        Thanks, Ruger!

        • iksnilol

          No one trusts Taurus? Speak for yourself, they’re the only ones making a 9 shot .357 magnum.

          • Laserbait

            Ugh, pass. I wouldn’t shoot anything but target round nose 38’s in a 9 shot Taurus. When people speak of legendary reliability, Taurus is not the name that exactly floats to the top.

          • Big Daddy

            I had a few Taurus handguns, never again. If they break and they do you have to send the gun to them and deal with their BS. Never again, no thanks.

          • Edeco

            9? Wow, I knew they were doing 8’s…

          • iksnilol

            Well, 8 shots of .357 + 1 one shot of you throwing the gun at your assailant because it’s just a Taurus and you aren’t out much by throwing it.

      • Harry’s Holsters

        My dad owns a SW 627 that I borrow a lot! But the redhawk is still my favorite revolver. I hope ruger makes it with a 7.5 inch barrel. The Redhawk does a perfect job of mixing the looks of a DA and SA revolver.

  • Swarf

    Next up: 10 shot .327 FedMag.

    • Xtorin O’hern

      i mean, i wouldn’t be against this

      • Swarf

        Absolutely not. Might get me to start buying the caliber. And the pistol.

      • Sunshine_Shooter

        I’d buy one as my next gun. Not even kidding.

    • I would be all over this, but what I really want is a 3-4″ LCRX in .327 as a lightweight hiking / pack gun, so long as they keep the weight to 20oz or so.

      • gordon

        The 30oz 4.2″ .327 SP101 felt pretty light (as light as my 22oz Five Seven) the few times I carried it (my wife’s gun). The weight is very nice when shooting 500ft-lb + loads.

    • Red McCloud

      Funfact: Ruger used to make a 8 shot .327 FedMag Blackhawk back in the day.

      • Laserbait

        And a 7 shot 327 Federal Mag GP100!

    • Blake

      I was just about to say the same thing.

      In addition to the impressive capacity, 327 Fed (& especially it’s lower-powered ancestors that work just fine in 327 Fed guns) would have quite manageable recoil in a monster revolver like a Super Redhawk.

      Add to that Henry’s recently-announced 327 Fed carbine (H006MR327) & you’ve got a really nice pistol/rifle duo.

      32S&W Long is about the same price/rnd as 38SP, so you can afford to practice & plink with them too.

  • Rnasser Rnasser

    How does an aunfluted cylinder “adds to the rigidity” of the revolver?

    • Swarf

      Hold on, let me get the marketing department back on the phone.

    • Edeco

      Drives me bonkers, when they have fluting they talk it up, when they skip it they talk it up. Both OK options but cheesy marketing.

      • iksnilol

        I’mma be honest, I like an unfluted cylinder simply due to the rustic, “old school western” look… So yeah, its aestethics for me.

        • Edeco

          Totally, they’re pretty and I’m like the Inquisition against wasted lines. I like ’em on coltish (also Colt-ish) open-tops. I could see it adding a bit of strength* which in rare cases, might be the right choice. In this case though, I can’t picture it being right, there looks to be adequate meat around the charge holes, and with a short barrel and moderate cartridge I’d rather see added lightness, as Colin Chapman would say.

          * just a bit, space- and cost-efficiently but not weight-efficiently. Which fits with old guns; often skinny but heavy.

  • DaveP

    Good on Ruger. The .44 Special GP is just the ticket for states that ban hollowpoints- 5 shots of .44 full wad cutter will make a mess of anyone’s day.

    • iksnilol

      Or just use soft-points or copper bullets.

      Those work too.

      • Kivaari

        A couple states outlaw expanding ammunition.

  • ??

    This is a good start. But a Super Redhawk in .357 would be EPIC for handloaders.

  • If the new GP100 had been a 5 shot .44 mag with 4″ barrel, I could see them selling a ton of them.

    But who in this day and age shoots .44 special? Son of Sam cosplayers not withstanding, pretty much everyone would be better off shooting .45 ACP with moonclips, especially as it is available in 1,000 found cases for plinking:

    From Underwood:
    .45 ACP +p: 200gr Gold dot: 1100fps, 537 ft/lbs
    44 Special 200gr Gold dot: 1100fps, 537 ft/lbs

    • Martin M

      I actually like 44spl for that very reason. It’s essentially a rimmed 45. Still, I totally agree with your take that it should be a 45 with moon clips.

      • Laserbait

        I’m not a big fan of moon clips because they’re kind of bulky in the pocket. I prefer speedstrips. I’d love to see a 10mm version though, even with moon clips!

    • gunsandrockets

      Well there’s always the Charter Arms Pitbull in .45 ACP and the S&W Model 69 in .44 Magnum.

      • Laserbait

        Cool – I didn’t know they came out with a 45 Pitbull!

        • Big Al

          10mm & 45 pitbull

    • DaveP.

      Who shoots .44 special? Two guys named Keith and Skelton had a field day with it, for a start. Remember, the only reason we have the Magnum is that Elmer got tired of blowing up 50-year-old SAA’s and not because the cases failed.

      • iksnilol

        Well, buying a .44 special only gun is sorta pointless. Just like buying a .38 special only gun.

        • Sunshine_Shooter

          Only pointless if your only purpose is to shoot magnums.

          • iksnilol

            No offense, but at this point I’d dare wager .44 magnum is more available than .44 special.

          • Laserbait

            Only to people that do not reload. For example, within an hour, I could have over 200 rounds of 44 special ready to go, and I wouldn’t even need to leave the house to do it.

          • iksnilol

            So?

            If you reload you open up twice as many opportunities going with 44 mag/special over .44 special only.

          • Laserbait

            But still there is the issue with the weight, and size, of the 44 Mag capable revolver that handloading cannot resolve.

          • iksnilol

            You call that an issue, I call it added durability and control 😉

          • Laserbait

            Do you carry a 44 mag regularly? I do, and I will personally welcome the reduction in weight. As far as durability, it’s a Ruger (pretty much the gold standard for strong double action revolvers), not a Taurus. Control is in you, and comes with practice. Weight only assists.

          • iksnilol

            Well, there’s your problem. You carry a Ruger and complain about weight.

            That’s like saying “ooh gee, this lead ballast is heavy”. Like, Ruger can’t make a lightweight handgun for the life of them. Something to do with them using cast frames.

            I’ve never had an issue with Taurus, besides, it’s cheap enough I can afford to throw it in my assailants face when running out of ammo (due to being stupid enough to bring a revolver to a proper shootout). I mean, would I throw a fancy and expensive S&W or Ruger? Oh no, I can’t afford that. But a Taurus? Sure, screw it, I’ll get two of them.

            YEAH, OF COURSE WEIGHT ASSISTS, YOU KNEW WHAT I MEANT, YOU PENDANTIC NINCOMPOOP! Now you went ahead and done got me agitated. For shame, my good sir… for shame.

          • Laserbait

            I was not complaining of the weight, I just said that I would welcome a reduction in the weight, that’s all. And regarding the Taurus, you’ll probably need two of them (Tauri?). That way, you’re almost assured to have a working gun.

            Pedantic? Hardly. I’m not a mindreader. Just say what you mean, and mean what you say. No need to get agitated.

          • Sunshine_Shooter

            Valid point, wasn’t thinking about having to actually source ammo. To Laserbait: Most people do not (yet) reload, so that’s a moot point.

          • iksnilol

            Sumthin’ like that. Besides, even folks who reload can’t be bothered to do it all the time. I mean, it is an investment of time. In the end you really don’t save too much if you factor in your time.

          • Laserbait

            Not a moot point, because anyone that does not reload, can always start.

        • Laserbait

          Not really. By limiting a gun to a lower pressure round like 38 or 44 Special, you can build a lighter weight and/or smaller firearm without resorting to more expensive materials.

          • iksnilol

            Yeah, but if you build it slightly stronger, you get less felt recoil with the special loads and you get the opportunity to use magnum loads as well. More options is always good in my book.

          • Laserbait

            Of which there are already a plethora of options available that can shoot 44 Mag. When I carry my 4″ 44 Mag Redhawk, I have 44 special level loads in it anyway, unless I’m out in the field. The GP100 in 44 Special allows me to carry a lighter weight & smaller firearm with loads that I’m already familiar with.

        • diana pierce

          The ‘pointless’ 44 special…..you’re not in touch with those who have physical needs…. age brings allot of that on… RA too … don’t cha know! Racking a 1911 becomes impossible… the only viable alternative is the revolver.

          • iksnilol

            No offense, ma’am, but if you can pull a double action revolver trigger 5-8 times then you sure as all heck can rack a slide once and keep it like that. You don’t strictly need arm strength either, you can just push it against a table end or something to rack it.

            Besides, a .44 mag revolver firing .44 specials is probably better for folks with reduced wrist strength in regards to avoiding damage to the wrists from the recoil.

        • Kivaari

          The .44 Special guns, like the S&Ws are lightened up. They make for better trail guns.

      • A.WChuck

        Even Dirty Harry admitted to shooting .44 Special in his Magnum.

      • Right, but that was 50 years ago, when the caliber was much more popular, and there were not a plethora of real magnum calibers.

        And if this GP100 was strong enough to handle +p+ .44 Special Keith handloads (which became the .44 magnum,) then it would have been chambered in .44 magnum to begin with.

        There’s nothing that .44 Special brings to the table that couldn’t be done better with a .45 ACP / .45 LC revolver, similar to the Redhawk Ruger released a few years ago.

  • Edeco

    O.O where my 41 Magnum at? Do me a 5 shot GP in 41 RM plz.

    • FWIW: The Redhawk was also offered in .41 Magnum from 1984 to 1991.

  • FYI: The Redhawk was manufactured in .357 Magnum from 1984 to 1991. However, these were only six-shot models.

    • Laserbait

      The 357 Redhawks were only made for 2 years after the 1984 introduction. Only the 41 Mag continued production till 1991.

  • Joe Met

    The .357 Magnum and 44 Magnum are cartridges. NOT calibers.

  • Kivaari

    The issue with the Redhawk, is no matter what caliber it is in it is a club.

    • diana pierce

      <—— sissy.

      • Kivaari

        Try a S&W M629 or M29. You get a lighter club. Rugers are tough, but crude.

        • 22winmag

          Apparently you’ve never tried a Speed Six, especially in SA.

          • Kivaari

            The Speed Six, out of print, isn’t a club like the GP100 or Redhawk. I rather liked the Speed Six, but it still isn’t a S&W.

          • diana pierce

            had a batch of speed sixs but sold all of them and went with the gp100 shorty.357.. yes a bit more metal.. but so what. After 40 yrs carrying it just isn’t noticed.

        • diana pierce

          understood.. thnx

  • Lew Siffer

    People still use revolvers?

  • Ben

    I’m waiting for the single six that only chambers 22 short.

  • diana pierce

    Finally… this is something I’ve long awaited… GP100… .357mag….8 Shooter w/Unfluted Cylinder and Shorty Barrel… Makes all the sense in the world. Superb for all needs etc. Its about time. Now , just how long will it be until the hit the shelves? Get it done!

    • 22winmag

      Ummmm… the article says nothing of the sort. What it does mention is an 8-shot .357 Redhawk, which is quite different than the GP100.

      • diana pierce

        Hmmm …. luv being corrected … especially on this … so important. Still want it though. But… since the Alaskan Kodiak came out awhile back I did find a craving for it in 44 to use specials.. hoping but not anticipating ruger would every produce it in .357 and 8 rounds to boot !! It’s fine with me for sure. Thanks for the cranial tweak.