Safariland Being Sued After Doughnut Icing Tests Positive For Meth

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It appears that those field tests for meth might not be as reliable as we all might have thought. A Flordia man was jailed after a loose flake of icing from his bi-weekly Krispy Kreme glazed doughnut tested positive for methamphetamine.

I know Krispy Kreme’s doughnuts are good, but test positive for drugs good?

When police pulled Dan Rushing over for speeding, they found a small piece of icing on the floor of his car during a search. The little piece of icing wasn’t even large enough to cover a pinky nail, officers then used a Safariland field test to determine if it was meth or not. According to an article by WFTV 9, the icing tested positive as meth not once, but twice.

Rushing was held for around 11 hours as well as strip searched as a result of the icing testing positive. There was no mention of if the charged were dismissed or he was released on bond, but shortly after The Flordia Department of Law Enforcement tested the icing in a lab, determining that the “meth” was in fact glaze.

No word at this time from Safariland as to why they tests failed to identify the icing as not meth or how they plan to respond to being sued. My question is how did these officers mistake doughnut glaze for meth, given their profession they should be familiar with the substance. It had to be said folks.

Click HERE for more on WFTV 9’s website.



Patrick R

Patrick is a Senior Writer for The Firearm Blog and works in the shooting sports industry. He is an avid recreational shooter and a verified gun nerd. With a lifelong passion for shooting, he has a love for all types of firearms, especially handguns and the AR-15 platform. Patrick may be contacted at tfbpatrick@gmail.com.

The above post is my opinion and does not reflect the views of any company or organization.


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  • Firearms not… Meth donuts?

    • Rocket-Fiend

      Was somewhat confused…I suppose it’s loosely related because Safariland makes weapon accessories and whatnot.

      • Mother Demanding Action

        Loosely related to the blog perhaps, but I found it a pretty entertaining article anyways.

        • Edeco

          The pic of ‘Jesse’ with meth donuts is so perfect, I’m not questioning it.

          • noob

            I guess that field test was breaking bad

      • Bill

        Safariland as a conglomerate has a couple companies that make narcotics field test kits, which I guess in this case also detects donuts.

        • Billy Jack

          I wouldn’t pay for a mobile meth test but testing the purity of donuts is right in my wheelhouse.

    • Cal S.

      Don’t ask. You’ll live longer.

      • iksnilol

        Oh he’ll live as long as he doesn’t bash the M16 and write love stories towards the M14.

        Remember the last time he did such things? Man, comments were ablaze.

        • Billy Jack

          I think he meant he could avoid that coronary+ stroke combo headed his way trying to map Patrick’s logic.

        • Cal S.

          Just imagine the hate if someone actually told the truth about the AK-47 in the gun industry…

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      Look man, I just got excited because I saw Safariland and doughnut in the same sentence. It made me think of Rob Leatham …. because of the Safariland part ….

      • Billy Jack

        Saw this story via news footage on YouTube. The cops tested a day old clump of icing on the driver’s side floor. The car wasn’t that dirty and the driver was an older square guy. The story made the officers involved look corrupt or stupid.
        Safariland also makes those duffel bags the NYPD abduct mentally disturbed people with. That’s way more disturbing than the false positives. It’s called a ventilated bag but if there’s ventilation you can’t see it. Looks like a Maxpedition Kiddknappe Sack. Only $9999.95.

        • Charles Applegate

          I believe that the story actually revealed the officers involved to be corrupt or stupid.

          • Billy Jack

            Lol. Hey we’ve all been really enthusiastic about something, acted without thinking things through and ended up regretting it. As someone who was once mistaken for a police officer, I think I can speak for all law enforcement when I say stuff happens.

      • For the record I wasn’t getting on your case, just making fun of the subject. 🙂

    • Ray Wylie Hubbub

      It was an honest METHtake. Guess that cop frittered away his next promotion. There couldn’t be a cruller fate.

      • William Elliott

        oooooh, I see what you did there….those were worthy of my dad…his humor is PUNishing…

        • Mike Lashewitz

          We might be related then….

      • Billy Jack

        All the meth the cops were smoking tainted the test.

  • PersonCommenting

    Could the police not of done their own test. Id sue them as well.

    • Yoyo

      d, but shortly after The Flordia Department of Law Enforcement tested the icing in a lab, determining that the “meth” was in fact glaze.

      They did test it.

      • Rocket-Fiend

        To clarify a bit: The majority of Florida agencies don’t have the ability (money/equipment/time) to test suspected narcotics on site.

        Field tests are utilized to confirm an officers suspicions about the need for further testing. It’s imperfect, but the only method available.

        Upon a positive field test the remaining narcotics are sent to FDLE (Florida Department of Law Enforcement)’s laboratory to find out exactly what the substance is.

        • Phillip Cooper

          Correct.
          Also, and here’s a big surprise- someone often has to transport that crap across the state. There isn’t a lab at every department or jail.

        • mbrd

          or the remaining NOT narcotics…

          i could be wrong here, as long as weed is a schedule 1 substance, why not krispy kreme icing?

      • PersonCommenting

        Yes but 11 Hours later? I mean maybe listen to the guy and what he is saying. I get they hear lies all the time but use other clues to determine if it sounds plausible. Granted the story doesnt say what he looked like, what he was driving, or how he behaved but at the risk of law suits these days throw a bit extra into the work and go out and test it on your own. Im not saying dont hold the guy but if you think it is kind of true dont rush to the strip search and booking so quickly.

        • Phillip Cooper

          Big surprise:
          Forensics labs DO NOT run 24/7, nor can they get results back in 30 seconds or less.
          You people have got to quit believing everything on NCIS!

          • PersonCommenting

            Again not saying they couldnt hold him for 11 hours I am saying they didnt have to treat him quite like a criminal. Maybe they could of tested their test packets to see if they tested positive for any substance.

          • Phillip Cooper

            With what? Another flawed field test kit?
            Testing a suspected faulty kit with another just like it is the definition of stupidity.

          • PersonCommenting

            Well if two are flawed then it may give them some info on how to treat him. Go get another donut or another substance. would that be that difficult?

          • Norm Glitz

            … could “have” tested …

          • PersonCommenting

            The article leaves a lot to be desired again. If he was just pulled over for a simple traffic violation then yeah maybe take a lot of other things into account. Now if they had reasonable suspicion based on priors or other circumstances then go for it.

        • Bill

          From the quick read they absolutely cut him loose before getting results back from the lab, which can take weeks. It doesn’t even sound like he was formally charged with any type of drug offense.

          • PersonCommenting

            It sounds like he was charged and the reason they pulled him over was for speeding. Again the article leaves a lot but it also sounds like they found one flake of icing. That is a bit of a reach do go out of the way to search that. There is a known drug trafficking interstate that runs through my state and you see a section of road that is highly patrolled by local and multiple state law enforcement agencies. They constantly search vehicles that people consent to. I hate that they can ask this. I hate that people dont know their rights. I hate the police can hold you till a supervisor or a dog comes around. It kind of sounds like this guy consented. I Mean if it was just a single flake of glaze.

          • Bill

            Those are technically known as High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas: HIDTA. Chances are that those LEOs on that stretch of highway are trained interdiction specialists.

            The issue is that one flake of an unknown substance (and I’ve seen plenty of grunge ground into car carpets) can lead to big bunches of unknown substances. It isn’t a reach at all.

            Plenty of people don’t consent; it doesn’t bother me at all because I know that real drug runners go out of their way to be be cooperative, banking on their methods of concealment being able to beat our methods of finding contraband. They aren’t going to play Roadside Lawyer. Non-consenters also seem to know the law, except when it comes to things like mobile conveyance exceptions stemming from the Carroll Doctrine. Pros know the car’s getting searched, and that raising heck about it won’t change that. We are even required to tell everyone that they don’t have to consent, and that they can withdraw consent at any time, and that’s all recorded on dash cams and body cameras nowadays. Real pros also go out of their way to look “normal;” one crew was paying elderly people on Social Security to drive their loads for them and was hanging out at Greyhound stations scouting people to drive rented white Toyotas and other bland sedans to destination states. Many if not most of those people didn’t know they were hauling megatonnage of drugs, they just thought they had lucked out because the nice man needed someone to deliver a nice car to his nephew in Cleveland or Detroit.

          • PersonCommenting

            I dislike the practice of asking people to search vehicles. It should be just cause or warranted searches only. I dont care how many dealers it stops if one innocent citizen has their life turned upside down that is one too many in my book.

    • Norm Glitz

      “have” done

  • Gambler X

    so how many people going to be getting out of jail because the Safariland test kit are defective?

    • Drew Coleman

      0. A field test kit is not good enough for reasonable doubt, it’s just enough to for further investigation and more thorough testing. What it will do is open the government and Safariland to lawsuits for people who were wrongly detained and had to deal with the stuff.

      • Swarf

        If it’s not good enough to establish reasonable doubt, then why was he held for 11 hours and strip searched?

        Field drug tests are lies. They are smoke screens that allow an officer to haul in whoever he or she wants IF they feel like it.

        Look at the cop funny? Don’t bow and scrape enough for their liking?

        That light brown powder on your floorboard sure looks like heroin. Could be dirt. Could be heroin.

        Oh look, a positive result, what a surprise! Here comes the cuffs.

        • Drew Coleman

          Reasonable doubt is for a court room. They need to improve the field tests yes, I agree, but it’s highly unlikely this will get any convictions overturned.

      • BigR

        If I have to spend a night in jail, and be stripped searched, I’d sue the police department also. That’s a bunch a BS, locking a guy up when he didn’t do anything, even for one hour. I’d own Safariland too, or what’s left of it.

    • Bill

      Not many, if any. There are scads of reasons for a positive test, including the fact that meth may have been present in the car at one time.

      • mbrd

        yeah, that’s the tough one, the residual contraband issue. i’m surprised it wasn’t brought up in the comments right away. unfortunately the positive field result comes with obligatory action on the officer’s part, even if the whole thing seems absurd. on the other hand the officer field testing seems most likely to be imagining a perp on his or her hands, not an innocent, so a false positive is probably not even a remote consideration on the side of the road.

        i think everybody is right about the field tests needing to at least be absolutely exclusionary of false positives (read: too expensive), and needing to be conducted in as clinical isolation as possible (read: impossible in the field) to be a reliable means for securing probable cause for an arrest and detention.

        on the other hand i don’t want my leo’s dipping a fingertip in every bag of coke for a freeze, every bag of dope for a bitter non-high, and any bag of dope cut with elephant tranquilizer (carfentanil) for a possible od…

        oh and… yeah, it’s not about firearms, but it’s still not too terribly off the beaten path.

        i appreciate your comments, seem pretty level headed for le ;)…

        i wish i could imagine all departments working with the integrity and credulity you espouse.

        • Bill

          Thanks, I try.

  • TheNotoriousIUD

    Now im hungry……..and I want to get high.

    • Swarf

      So… noon then?

      • TheNotoriousIUD

        Pretty much.

      • Gary Kirk

        4:20

  • AC97

    The hell?

  • Martin Grønsdal

    tomorrow on thefirearmblog: grandma sues v-agra due to granddaddys lack of performance.

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      If they made a 4ever-stiff gun belt I would be forced to cover it.

      • Mystick

        I dunno. That may be a Hard Target to meet.

        • iksnilol

          I had too think Long and Hard to get those puns.

          • Martin Grønsdal

            this is baffling… like a can in the wrong place

          • Gary Kirk

            Dude, I really hope that’s a gun and you’re just not good at concealment..

      • Phillip Cooper

        Nicely done sir…

      • jamezb

        That’ll make your pants stand up for themselves!

      • Gary Kirk

        Or 4 hour stiff belt.. Any longer you should seek medical attention..

    • Mike Lashewitz

      Ouch that is not funny !!!. . . . (yes it is)

  • Tyler McCommon

    The firearm blog became “the blog”.

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      Safariland makes gun things last I checked.

      • Tyler McCommon

        Indeed, but the article itself has nothing to do with firearms or firearm’s accessories.

        • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

          Well I guess it doesn’t impact the firearms industry. Oh wait.

          • Phillip Cooper

            Correct, it doesn’t.
            Wait, I’ll get you a ladder, and a Grabit. You’re going to hurt yourself reaching that far…

          • mbrd

            hey man, impact isn’t a verb.

            you’re impacting my grammatical sensibilities with this abuse.

      • Phillip Cooper

        .. and this is not a gun thing, last I checked.

        • jamezb

          Perhaps, but ultimately TFB belongs to TFB and TFB determines the content therein. If the title of an article does not seem gun related enough for you, don’t read the article. Safariland IS a gun accessory company. On of the lines they are known for are gun belts and holsters, Sam Brown belt manufacturers and sellers often sell the accessories that go on said belts (read that :”all manner of cop equipment”)
          If Safariland gets successfully sued, perhaps multiple times, over a faulty test kit branded under their name, and cannot recover damages themselves from the actual manufacturer (which I doubt is Safariland itself, but which might be a part of Safariland Group) then they may be screwed, and we may lose another major firearms industry name.

      • Bill

        Safariland also holds a company that makes field test kits.

        • BigR

          Well, it doesn’t look to good for Safariland. They need to stick to holsters!

  • anon

    wait, safari land makes drug test kits?

    • Bill

      Yes

      • mbrd

        they own three (i think) companies that produce test kits… it was a surprise to me too. the kits carry the labels of their respective manufacturers, safariland just bought the companies, i believe.

  • Garmanarnar

    Krispy kreme is cosmically overrated.

    • TheNotoriousIUD

      Shipleys FTW.

    • Anonymoose

      I grew up with local donut shops. My aunt worked at Krispy Kreme for a long time though, and the meth in their icing might explain her kids’ behavior…

      • Phillip Cooper

        Or, you know, sugar.

        • Anonymoose

          No, really, my one cousin’s a methhead, and my other cousin is a druggee-turned-religious-zealot.

          • Phillip Cooper

            Sorry you have to deal with this.
            Also, “druggee turned religious zealot”. So, traded one drug for another.

          • Bill

            You beat me to it. Opiate of the masses and all…

          • Porty1119

            Your cousin is Boyd Crowder?

          • Billy Jack

            That’s actually a common genetic draw. But since Krispy Kreme doesn’t know what a cruller is I’m good on sending them to prison for abusing your cousins.

      • Gary Kirk

        Wasn’t in western pa was it?

        • Anonymoose

          Nope.

    • Phillip Cooper

      You shut your mouth! ;P
      Seriously, if you’ve never had them hot out of the oven. Good lord.

    • BigR

      They’re the worst doughnut I’ve ever tasted. When they opened a store in my town, which is in Texas, they didn’t last a year, and shut it down. Good riddance!

      • glenn cheney

        I tried to tell em’ ya’ don’t use cornmeal for donuts. No one ever listens to me.

        • BigR

          glen cheney
          Maybe that’s why they tasted so gritty, we use a lot of corn meal in Texas!

          • glenn cheney

            They won’t “rise” on cornmeal….we grind up jumpin’ beans to dup for rising flour when we can’t get the good stuff.
            Most folks can’t tell, until mornin’ anyway, grin.

      • n0truscotsman

        I’ve been to many local doughnut shops, and those will ruthlessly take anything krispy kreme has to offer to the woodshed.

  • MindMelder

    These field tests are notoriously inconsistent. They have provided false positives for a variety of perfectly legal substances. Many youtube documentaries proving as such are available. Thousands of people are behind bars and countless others will never get a good job due to their background check reflecting a drug charge as a result of these tests.

  • Joe

    I don’t understand why anyone would take issue with such harassment and aggravation over donut icing.
    At least the enforcement methodology exemplified by these officers is winning “us” the “War”; it’s for the children you know.

    • mbrd

      uh… METHodology? was that intentional?

  • A Fascist Corgi

    They should summon Nathaniel F to serve as an expert witness on this lawsuit.

    • AC97

      You really can’t help yourself, can you?

      • mbrd

        oh hell, the whole thing has fallen apart, and i got in too late.

    • …Because I am a meth head?

      Oh! It’s another fat joke, right…

      • iksnilol

        Better fat than fascist, comrade. 😉

        Or a corgi for that matter, damn elongated chihuahuas.

        • Phillip Cooper

          “damn elongated chihuahuas”
          Oh dea god. Warn a brother, wilya? I aspirated my tea….

          • iksnilol

            I was sorta proud of that one, no hard feelings tho. We comedians gotta take it in stride.

          • Phillip Cooper

            Well you should be proud of it!

    • Phillip Cooper

      Who?

    • Don’t insult my writers.

      • A Fascist Corgi

        What’s the matter? Your writer that claimed that he only consumed 1,500 calories a day for over a year without losing any weight is too sensitive to cope with a simple fat joke?

        • AC97

          Do you really think you’re helping your case?

      • iksnilol

        Papa Steve strikes! YES 😀 !

  • jamezb

    If you produce tests that always show positive, then the police are always “right” and the “for-profit prison” industry is insured a steady flow of new cash cows. How many states actually test every sample at a state crime lab? If you were a cop, wouldn’t you prefer a test that backs up your “professional intuition” that EVERY bit of plaster, sugar, and frosting is a felonious drug?

    • Bill

      No. Field test kits are referred to as “presumptive” tests of the identity of a substance and do not serve as evidence in and of themselves. After the field test shows a positive the material is tested by a forensic chemist in a lab setting with science stuff, like spectroscopes and gas chromatographs, and THAT test and substance is what serves as evidence at trial. The defense can run their own tests at their own labs if they question the validity of the .gov test.

      No one goes to prison over a bad field test, or, if they do, their lawyer sucked.

      If I cite someone with an open beer in public and it goes to trial, I have to submit a sample of that beer to the state lab, a PhD. chemist has to analyze it, and his/her testimony, test results and said beer ends up in court. If that happens for BEER, it sure as donut holes happens to dope.

      • Tom Currie

        Don’t count on that degree of caution happening in every jurisdiction and every case — especially when the police and the county attorney are just as happy to settle for a plea deal on some lesser charge that saves all that time and money while guaranteeing the police a successfully closed case and the county attorney a conviction so they can both keep their stats up.

      • jfsoren

        “No one goes to prison over a bad field test”, but sitting in jail over a weekend or maybe longer while waiting for “official” lab results that will show the suspect is innocent is enough to cause a multi-million dollar lawsuit against the police and the manufacturer of the field test kit. Whatever happened to “Innocent until PROVEN guilty”?

        • Bill

          It could cause a million dollar lawsuit, but that doesn’t mean the suit will stand or the plaintiff will prevail. We work in a grey space between innocence and guilt, based on probable cause. You don’t get proven guilty or not until the end of a trial, not on the roadside during a vehicle stop.

    • n0truscotsman

      You’re absolutely correct. like what was posted in the video below, nobody will bat for drug addicts. If they get a positive test, even if that test is utter bulls–t, people generally do not care.

      but that’s the problem with things like this. They eventually ensnare well-meaning innocents.

    • Mike Lashewitz

      Personal experience in the US Navy. In 1984, 42 members of the USS Ticonderoga tested positive for marijuana use in a RANDOM screening. Those 42 members were reduced in rank and some were dishonorably discharged. It was subsequently found out the chemicals used in the testing were improperly stored. in 125 a degree space when they were supposed to be stored in a 72 degree storage locker.

      Did the US Navy go back and undo the damages they caused to the men’s careers? Did they return those me to their former ranks? NO!!! Instead the Navy hush hushed the results and instead sent out a one paragraph bulletin about proper storage of the testing materials.

      Can we expect ANYTHING different from another government organization????

  • J0shua

    What’s more likely, that Safariland makes bunk drug tests or that Florida makes bunk cops who are either incompetent or corrupt?

    • Phillip Cooper

      ‘lil column “A”, ‘lil column “B”
      Seriously, there’s some crap going on in FL. I expect the Zombie Apocalypse to start there.

      • Swarf

        More like “all of the above, everywhere.”

      • Billy Jack

        When that guy was face eating a few years back in Fl. I thought it was time.

        • iksnilol

          Got my hopes up and popcorn ready and everythang.

        • Phillip Cooper

          I did, too.
          Took a week to wipe the grin off my face.

  • Jacen

    And we’re supposed to trust our lives to these guys

    • Billy Jack

      I was looking at a Safariland holster but is it even real leather? I’m having second thoughts.

      • mbrd

        safariland sells chemical test kits to determine whether their holsters are real leather. i’ve used them, and they always come up positive…

  • Mystick

    Why were the police searching his car for a traffic violation?

    • Phillip Cooper

      Because “When I approached the car I smelled something through the window so I asked if I could search”.
      And the dumb___ said “sure!”

      • iksnilol

        He’s dumb now? I bet he’ll earn at least a little money after the lawsuit after all the bills are paid. I’d say he’s smart.

        “Liars, cheats and other proud Americans”

    • Billy Jack

      Cuz that’s the job.

      • Mystick

        No, that’s overreach of authority.

        • Billy Jack

          It’s both and it’s the status quo many places. You think they aren’t expected to act that way in certain depts? Look at the LA County Sheriff’s Dept. How can you do your job clean when even the top guy is a fraud?

  • Phillip Cooper

    Completely agree with the last sentence- how does one confuse donut icing (basically, sugar and fat) for CRYSTAL meth?

  • Disarmed in CA

    What happened to the good ole days where the LEO would cut into the bag and taste whatever it was and magically determine the legality of it?

    • Phillip Cooper

      Watch a lot of cop shows, do ya?

    • Bill

      No, you rub it on your gums…and you have to cut open the bag with an Italian stiletto-style switchblade.

      Even drug dealers use field test kits.

  • jamezb

    he looks more like saul to me..

  • Gary Kirk

    If Krispey Kremes contain meth.. The the police force would be overly strained arresting themselves..

  • Bierstadt54

    It’s all good, Patrick. Firearms-related company getting sued, and its funny.

  • SerArthurDayne

    Sweet to see he’s out of a sticky situation… I could be up all night thinking about those donuts… Those cops need to stop for a cup of coffee and intake some mono-saccarides ….

  • Bill

    Point of info: the icing may have come into contact with traces of meth in a number of ways, it may or may not have been due to the chemical composition of the icing. There is drug residue in a lot of cars, on currency and so forth.

    When I go to buy a used car I get it sniffed by a dope dog, justincase. A dog alerted on one, we didn’t find anything, but it’s likely that at some point in time there had been some drugs in the car.

    • Billy Jack

      It’s also possible the dog false alerted. It happens.

      • Swarf

        It happens. It also “happens” when it’s convenient to the cop’s agenda.

        • Edeco

          Sergeant Snappy lifted a paw so the 4th Amendment no longer applies.

  • Edeco

    I don’t think I own anything by Safariland, will have to keep it that way if they’re making drug test kits.

  • wetcorps

    WTF?

  • Tassiebush

    It’s pretty bad when you risk having your donut punched because of misidentication

  • n0truscotsman

    Stupid all around.

    Safariland is also not the only company with skin in the ‘field tests’ game, which, like most forensics law enforcement methods, teeters into pseudoscience territory.

    Many people’s lives have been ruined by pseudoscience ‘forensics’ feel good CSI bull crap that allows ignorant middle classers to pat themselves on the back in self-validation, while somehow feeling self-righteous for certain segments of society to be utterly hammered into oblivion.

    • mbrd

      yep, good points all.

  • Billy Jack

    Would you trust Remington in your moment of need?

    • Mike Lashewitz

      Nope! Instead I would fear another recall….

  • HAHA73

    Oh I just love doughnuts

  • PersonCommenting

    So I was right. The guy consented to a search.

  • Rock Island Auction

    Perfect article photo.

  • Noah Tahl

    False positives are a feature, not a bug, like drug sniffing dogs that indicate drugs being present when their handlers expect/hope/would like them to.

  • LetsTryLibertyAgain

    At trial, Safariland should compare the accuracy of their glaze loving meth test with the ubiquitous Magic Constitution Disappearing Dog that sits on command. It always bothered me that a German shepherd can lick his sack and that’s probable cause to search a vehicle and the 4th amendment be damned.

    Also, the police can sic a dog on a suspect and let him chew for a long while, but if the suspect tries to defend himself by fending off the dog he’s charged with assaulting a police officer. So why is it that when the police leave one of their dogs in the K9 unit with the windows rolled up in sweltering summer heat and the dog dies (search online, it happens frequently), the driver isn’t charged with killing a police officer?

  • Ben Pottinger

    Wouldn’t it be cool if we stuck to tossing people in jail for actually doing something bad? Instead of tossing them in for having the wrong gun parts, to small a gun or o large a gun or simply the “wrong” substance in their possession? Wouldn’t that be novel?

  • American Spartan

    Think of all the other lives ruined because of moronic tests, laws, false positives, etc.

  • n0truscotsman

    Thats horrifying. Its a shame nobody went to prison.

    • Billy Jack

      They probably just put all the blame on the dog for false alerting. Not everyone would be satisfied with dollars paid for those transgressions.

  • durabo

    It was his glazed eyes that betrayed him

  • Libertarian in 2016

    One of the problems with handing out presumptive test kits to all and sundry is that you have to be aware of the potential for false positives. Too many coppers have either never been told or ignored the fact that a variety of non-controlled substances will test positive when using a field test. You have to look at the totality of the circumstances and apply some common sense.

    Back in the ’80s, my partner and I were called to a Job Corps facility by their security people, who had found a bag of white powder in a kid’s room which had tested positive for meth. The kid was insisting that it was laundry detergent. It was in a nylon (not plastic) bag and it smelled like laundry detergent. We took the powder and submitted it for testing and it was, in fact, detergent.

    These cops should have been using their heads instead of relying on the test to the exclusion of all else. Sounds like a training issue.

  • Mark Are Reynolds Ⓥ

    I just love how LE rely on BS to try to cage or enslave people to a ridiculous high fine for drug possession. I think that a litmus test of freedom is that I can put in my body whatever I feel like. But hey…freedom is an unknown in most peoples minds. They wouldn’t know what it was if it bit them on the butt. And as for those “officer” dogs that can’t sign a 4th amendment warrant because of their inability to write, or for that matter speak (well except for the rare few , like the Shaggy Dog)…seems to me it becomes hearsay when the dog claims there is drugs in a car and then the cop swears out the warrant on the hearsay of “officer” dog. And as for the LE swearing to protect and defend the Constitution…LOL! That’s a laugh. Most wouldn’t have the slightest idea what the 4th says or the 3rd. Do you?

  • Michael P.

    First things first……NEVER, NEVER, NEVER give the police permission to search your vehicle, even if you have nothing to hide.

  • Mikial

    The public assumes police officers know what they are doing. Poor assumption.

  • Doom

    BRB scraping a bunch of icing into a bag and getting pulled over. PAYDAY$$$$$$$$$$$