An Artist who “PAINTS” with GUNPOWDER. Originals cost $1,000.

Capture

While many equate the burning of gunpowder with the crack of a contained explosion, those familiar with its chemical properties known that burning it unconstrained typically creates on a brief flash and fire. Taking advantage of this is Wyoming artist Danny Shervin, who started experimenting with it at college in Montana.

In short, the “painting” is completed by the burning of gunpowder granules that are strategically placed on a medium (typically wood or a canvas) and when arranged to the artist’s intent, are set alight to spectacular effect.

The art focuses primarily on the wildlife typical to Wyoming. Various standard work includes moose, elk, cows, trout, and various birds. Check out the burning of the Hereford Cow below.

Danny has set up a website dedicated to the work, aptly titled “Paint with Gunpowder” which creates a secure shopping portal to purchase prints and some original work. For those so inclined to commission a custom work, customers are encouraged to contact the artist directly through e-mail.

Originals float around $1,000 with prints varying from about $50 up to $150 for signed “limited editions.” The art is able to be shipped internationally post burning, so those in firearms restricted locales need not worry about violating any laws. T-Shirts are also available.

 



Nathan S.

One of TFB’s resident Jarheads, Nathan now works within the firearms industry. A consecutive Marine rifle and pistol expert, he enjoys local 3-gun, NFA, gunsmithing, MSR’s, & high-speed gear. Nathan has traveled to over 30 countries working with US DoD & foreign MoDs.

Nathan can be reached at Nathan.S@TheFirearmBlog.com

The above post is my opinion and does not reflect the views of any company or organization.


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  • Riot

    Okay that is quite cool.

  • Trevor

    I like when you guys occasionally feature stuff that is only tangentially related to firearms. It rounds out the blog nicely.

  • M.M.D.C.

    The effect is very much like a stipple drawing, done with pen and ink. The beauty of the gunpowder technique is that the artist can ‘arrange’ his entire drawing before he commits to any one mark. With pen and ink, of course, each dot is immediately fixed, ruling out any editing along the way.

    • Southpaw89

      Just don’t sneeze.

  • BrandonAKsALot

    This went Iin a totally different way than I expected. I figured it was some anti gun painter mixing gun powder in paint. This is way better.

  • Southpaw89

    That’s actually pretty cool, wonder if using black powder on steel could create an image in rust? This could also be an awesome way to do a pattern on a gun stock.

  • gol

    For those interested, Chinese artist Cai Guo-Qiang does simular work only I think he usually uses blackpowder and sometimes fireworks.