The Age of Telescoped Ammunition Has Arrived – UK Receives 40mm CTA

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The United Kingdom has become the first nation in the world to receive a modern cased telescoped ammunition (CTA) automatic weapon, the French 40mm CTCS, according to IHS Jane’s. The UK procured the weapons in July of last year to upgrade their Warrior IFVs, and as the main armament for the new Ajax scout tanks, expected to enter service in 2017.

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The Ajax scout vehicle. Image source: Janes.com

 

The 40mm CTA weapon utilizes a wheel-like chamber, similar to that used in the famous Heckler & Koch G11 rifle of the 1980s and ’90s. Ammunition is fed nose-first through the side using a rotary presenter and rammer arrangement. Despite its 40mm caliber, the CTCS gun is only about the same size as the 30mm Mk. 44 Bushmaster II cannon used on some armored vehicles and ships, and only a little bit bigger than the 30mm RARDEN cannon used in the Warrior IFV currently. Therefore, it offers a significant firepower upgrade to light armored vehicles like the Warrior.

40mm-CTAS-Gun

Image source: thinkdefence.co.uk

 

The 40mm CTAI CTCS is maybe not the first telescoped ammunition gun to ever enter service, but it is a milestone in that it is the first CTA firing automatic weapon to enter service that utilizes modern ammunition designed to be more compact and lightweight.

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The 40mm CTCS gun. Image source: Janes.com

 

CTA-40mm-Natures-1060x800

40mm cased telescoped ammunition. Image source: thinkdefence.co.uk

 

An evaluation of the CTCS gun from all the way back in 2000 can be found via DTIC, here (warning: link begins a download).



Nathaniel F

Nathaniel is a history enthusiast and firearms hobbyist whose primary interest lies in military small arms technological developments beginning with the smokeless powder era. In addition to contributing to The Firearm Blog, he runs 196,800 Revolutions Per Minute, a blog devoted to modern small arms design and theory. He can be reached via email at nathaniel.f@staff.thefirearmblog.com.


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  • Cannoneer No. 4

    I can see it now, Boston PD mounting these on their Bearcats. Since us readers are much more likely to be on the receiving end than the trigger end of this ordnance, what practical tips can you give us for defeating 40mm GPR-AB-T?

    • BattleshipGrey

      Molotov cocktails to the windows and cameras.

      • buzzman1

        Engine intakes are quite effective. Engines cant run if they cant breath. Burn the tires and runflats dont work so well.

    • Goody

      Learn your rifle while you can, learn windage, drop. At the moment I can hit a golf ball at 200m, but that’s not good enough. 200m is still way too small of an evasion area – I need to be hitting tennis balls at 400m where wind gets difficult, then 6″ steel at 600+.

      In a built up area I figure 600m+ will give a good chance to stash & evade after waiting for a soft target.

      • CommonSense23

        What gun are you hitting a gold ball at a
        200 meters with?

        • randomswede

          If my math is right a 0.37 MOA gun in a vice.

          • CommonSense23

            I am drunk, but am pretty sure your math is right. His skill level he is stating is definitely better than mine and I went to different branches snipet schools.

          • randomswede

            Well, given enough ammo and time I guess anyone could eventually hit a golf ball at 200m, but that’s sort of like claiming you know Angelina Jolie because you own a hat she once wore.

          • Paul Joly

            Wrong 0.73 MOA.

            1 MOA = 1.047″ at 100yrd = 2,29″ at 200m
            Golf ball dia = 1.68″
            1.68/2,29=0.73

          • randomswede

            If you just barely miss the ball on the left side and move over 0.73 MOA you’d hit the ball on the very edge of the right side (assuming zero MOA shift in between the shots).

            Or as I prefer to see it; aiming at the center of the ball you can be off by a little more than half the diameter of the ball and still hit it (as the bullet has a diameter as well). So 0.73/2 = 0.365 and rounding that up we get 0.37 MOA.
            …or are we assuming a 1.68″ caliber rifle?

            This is also assuming we are shooting at the slightly larger american sized golf ball.

          • Paul Joly

            The dispersion is calculated center to center not outside-to-outside edge of the two holes that are farthest apart.
            Actually I haven’t take in count the bullet diameter in my calculation since I don’t know it ; but the bigger the bullet is, the higher the final possible dispersion will be.

          • randomswede

            You are correct.
            My understanding of the term was angle in between point of aim and maximum deviation, it seems that it’s the angle of the cone.
            At least I did the math correctly despite it being with the wrong “formula”. -_-

          • RA

            I’m shooting sub .5″ off a bench rest (no Vise!) with a Tikka T3 .270 at 100yds. Pretty sure I can hit a golf ball at 200yds

        • Goody

          T3 varmint 308. Took me nearly a year to find this load. 46.4gr AR2208 under 155gr HBC bullet, loaded on Wilson dies. I think the Australian HBCs are now called “Optima”.

          A golf ball at 200 is quite a bit bigger than 1/2moa, any good barrel in a good stock can do that with the right load. Mechanically the accuracy is there, but I definitely need to sort positional shooting and longer ranges before The Happening.

          • Paul Joly

            (1.68+0.308)/2,29= 0.87 moa
            Shooting at 0.87moa without some fancy rifle stabilization system is really impressive.

          • Goody

            Sub moa is the standard by which Tikkas are sold. Not that hard off a simple front & rear rest. Take away the rest, and the system becomes almost useless.

          • RA

            EXACTLY! Just saw your post. I own two Tikkas in 270. Deadly accurate. 100yds is .5″ or less.
            Not bragging but was a good shooter before I bought them, but 350-450yds is cake now IMO.

      • Greg Kelemen

        Your ideas intrigue me and I wish to subscribe to your newsletter..

    • Greg Kelemen

      Duck n’ weave hut! hut!

  • BattleshipGrey

    Sweet! Now the US just needs to start a war somewhere so the UK can try them out.

    • Geoff

      The UK should start by deploying these in their no-go zones. No-go for unarmed “cops” (i.e. social workers) doesn’t mean no-go for light armor.

      • MartinWoodhead

        Because we have so many that require light armour?.
        Oh wait we don’t. Strangely not selling guns and ammo at Asda tends to limit the mayhem funny that?

        • Ceiling Cat

          Britcock anti gunner strikes again. Ought to ban scum like these from all gun forums. Or from life. Thats better.

          • MartinWoodhead

            Oh dear have the commies been after your precious bodily fluids again?

          • Greg Kelemen

            You are talking about yourself yeah?

          • Hensley Beuron Garlington

            Again, you’re another one that Britain First and Knights Templar International would call clueless.

        • Greg Kelemen

          Honestly, u think there aren’t thousands of AK’s in the hands of Muslims in your country?

          • MartinWoodhead

            Well if they are they are not actually doing anything. the last terrorist attack used a car knives and an antique handgun that malfunctioned.

          • CountryBoy

            Don’t go by the “last” attack. Go by the next one; they are just warming up.

      • Liam

        Why is it that in the US a rough neighborhood is just a rough neighborhood, but when we’re talking about the UK it’s a big scary no-go zone. They absolutely do deploy cops to these areas.

        • Geoff

          Because unarmed cops being “deployed” is about as useful as “deploying” a firefighter with no training or equipment to put out a fire.
          You will toil hard under Sharia law (if they let you live at all) as a dhimmi slave if you keep burying your head in the sand.

          • ChierDuChien

            That will occur before the average Brit even realizes it.

          • Yeah you have no understanding of how things are in the UK. Stop listening to what Trump says.

          • Geoff

            Yeah, you have no understanding of how thoroughly you’ve been invaded. And people (including myself) have been aware of Islam’s infiltration of the UK, Europe and the West in general way before Trump. You act as if he’s the only one who sees Jihad for what it is.
            Keep burying your head in the sand and soon you won’t have a head at all.
            Bow down to your Muslim masters

          • kyphe

            Oh shut up you brainwashed muppet lol! the fastest growing religious demographic in the UK is “non religion” the largest immigrant group to enter the UK in the past 10 years was the polish! learn some facts before talking nonsense!

          • Geoff

            Astonishingly weak argument, if you can even call it that. A product of the public indoctrination system, no doubt.
            a) please provide a source for those numbers
            b) “non-religion” is not really a demographic. There is no unifying belief there, unlike with Islam where there is, and a unified sense of belonging, community, etc. Non-religious aren’t beheading people in the street to advance non-religion.
            c) I doubt the Polish are the largest immigrant group, but again, even if that were so, Polish people aren’t beheading anyone, demanding special laws that make drawing Poles illegal, aren’t mutilating the genitals of children, etc.

            God damn, it’s like if you had 1,000,000 rapists entering the country, and then you asserting that it’s nothing to worry about because there were 1,000,001 non rapists entering as well. Blinded by multiculturalism. As if Rotherham didn’t happen, As if all those little children weren’t gang-raped by “asian”, i.e. Muslim, men. You have blood on your hands. You have sold out your countrymen and women and children. You let the enemy into the gates, and if there is any justice in this world, you will hang for your cowardice and treason.

          • kyphe

            LOL non religion not a demographic! you sir have just shown yourself to be a fool, no sorry you were a fool from the start now you are a clown act. what you believe is of no concern to me. possibly of concern to the psychiatric profession but not to me.

          • Geoff

            You didn’t address any of the other rebuttals to your points.
            And not being religious is not even remotely close to a demographic as is being Muslim. One tells you what their defined belief system is, while the other offers almost zero information about the belief system.

            Still scared of those Poles coming to behead your soldiers, systematically gang rape your children while the police look the other way, huh?
            Pathetic cuckold traitor. You belong swinging from the gallows.

          • Stop with the insults guys—– Off topic—

          • kyphe

            Come and look kids! dad will show you what an insane zealot looks like. Pay close attention to his murderous nature! how he wants to impose a capital punishment system for anyone who disagrees with his racist stereotyping and general ignorance! Yes Steve that also makes him a hypocrite but don’t confuse him with big words!

          • Hensley Beuron Garlington

            I believe Britain First would say you don’t have an idea of what’s going on in the UK. So would the Knights Templar International.

          • And the KKK and other right wing organisations would tell me the situation is so much more worse than it is in their home countries too. Moral of the story; there are paranoid, racist / bigoted crackpots everywhere. Britain First is a laughing stock group which is full of racists and bigots and you can’t really believe much of what they say, especially as they rarely fact check any of the tripe they spew from their ‘mouths’. Much like Trump, actually. He’d be a good leader for them.

    • USMC03Vet

      Europe is currently at war and has been for years. They just refuse to acknowledge it.

    • buzzman1

      UN just decided t Fauklands belong to the Argentinians. They may have their own war soon.

      • MartinWoodhead

        As Argentina would be hard pressed to afford a case of mosins and ammo I feel that’s unlikely

        • buzzman1

          The UN will send in forces to take the island back for them.

          • MartinWoodhead

            yeah about that the UK is part of the security council,It plays the veto card its super effective:)

      • kyphe

        False! Nothing of the sort! if you had done a second of checking you would know that you are talking trash

        • buzzman1

          Google it.

          • kyphe

            You! google it lol and then try to read what it says! An advisory body of the UN on maritime coastal law Agrees that Argentina should be allowed to extend its territorial waters beyond 200nm due the the shape of the continental shelf! However! This does not cover the territorial waters of the Falklands which extends 200nm out from the Falklands coast! What this means if confirmed is that the overlap of territorial zones increases and Argentina may try to use this fact to blockade the Falklands by exerting sanctions on shipping. This advisory body can not make rulings on issues of sovereignty just like the commission on decolonization can not make rulings on sovereignty! Argentina loves to make up stories about the UN supporting them.

  • Patriot Gunner

    IMHO I think this is the best application of the telescoped ammunition design. It doesn’t have to contend with the same space and weight requirements as small arms. Plus it’s not gas-operated allowing for much better reliability. Time will tell, but I believe the LSAT program will be a bust. Factor in issues like gas jetting, increased complexity and cost and it’s easy to see that the current tech in small arms will be here to stay for awhile.

    • Joshua

      The LSAT LMG is actually vastly easier to maintain than the current M249. It has far fewer operating parts and what it does have are more robust.

      • RealitiCzech

        Easy to maintain doesn’t help when they don’t bother to maintain them in the first place, which is the problem with the M249.

      • Patriot Gunner

        Hmm I wouldn’t agree with you on that. All the technical stuff I’ve read indicates to more parts, at least moving parts. The rotating chamber doesn’t look robust and I can’t imagine clearing malfunctions is going to be easy. Also, barrel wear has been an issue as well as the gas jetting problem. I don’t know if they solved this problem with newer powders, but cased telescoping ammunition is horrible inefficient, requiring substantially more powder to achieve the same velocities as standard ammo.

    • randomswede

      If the LSAT program bares no fruit it’s because the ghost of General MacArthur swims by barking about the enormous stock of 5.56×45 and 7.62×51 along with some opinions to the effect of “40% weight savings will only add to the cost as the soldiers will shoot 40% more” or “I can’t replace something battle proven with an unknown” or something I’d hear as “We can’t replace this rifle that’s at the end of what it can be after 40 years of evolution with a rifle that’s only marginally better at the beginning of it’s existence”.

      But I’m more of a technocrat or neophile than a politician or an economist (or as my university math teacher called them “modern astrologers”).

      • buzzman1

        The number of rounds a soldier uses is irrelevant. If it was they wouldnt be going back to full auto. However the infrastructure replacement would cost a fortune and the military does need to do years of real testing on the ammo and weapons to see how they hold up to all kinds of environments and storage.

        • randomswede

          I hear what you are saying, and I’m sure the same things were said by someone when the M1 Garand superseded the Springfield.
          It’s not like there are no new M4s M16s being bought by the armed forces, not to mentioned they don’t live forever.
          Start nibbling at one unit at a time and over time it’s a non issue, the Israeli are doing just that with the Tavor to replace their M16s and M4s. One difference is of course the caliber change, for that we can look to the introduction of the M16 replacing the M14.

          It’s not cheap, unless you compare it to nuclear submarines and stealth fighters, then it is. (Again, I’m not an economist so if anyone has the numbers to disprove this statement please I’ll pick something more expensive)

          • buzzman1

            That’s not a good comparison. Yeah I’ve read how the M-1 was given the 30-06 ammo because of the huge amount of it we still had in storage from WW1. But changing over from the M14 was different because of all of the problems with the weapon in Vietnam and more importantly combat doctrine changed. Also we had procured new machine guns in 7.62 so the infrastructure for that round was already in place. We simply began manufacturing a new class of ammo for the new rifle. But both were still based on old technology. Buying into caseless ammo will require buying a completely new technology weapon, a new and unproven ammunition and the equipment to fix and otherwise support it. And besides reducing weight what benefit in cost and performance does it offer? Some time cost and supportability are the overwhelming decision makers for procuring a system.
            You should also understand that just because they can make things in the 40mm and above size does not mean the technology can be used at the micro level of rifle ammo.
            BTW the army spent more money on weapons testing that it had no intention of going by than it would have cost to upgrade every M-4 in the army to the A4 config.

          • randomswede

            Have you read anything about the LSAT program?
            I’ll try and sum it up for you:

            Caseless ammunition is unlikely to be the pick, though superior in volume savings to the polymer cased telescoping round as well as conventional brass cased round.

            Some 85,000 cased telescoping rounds have been fired through 10 weapons, so “unproven” maybe but well tested for a (relatively) early prototype.

            The main focus of the program has been a replacement for the M249 SAW, the LSAT LMG prototype is 9.8 pounds to the SAWs 17.0 pounds dry; add 100 rounds and the LSAT LMG is ~11.8 pounds and the SAW 22.0 pounds.

            The prototype ammo uses the bullet from M855 and is balanced to just outperform M855.

            At 600 rpm and with long stroke soft recoil action (similar to the Ultimax 100) staying on target is easier.

            Unit replacement cost is about 20% down, long term maintenance remains a question obviously.

            The ammunition can be manufactured(pressed) on existing machinery, the brass (a strategic resource BTW) is replaced with plastic and the tooling changed accordingly but no “magic” involved and production of the cases uses conventional molding processes.

            The carbine mockup (the prototype isn’t public yet to my knowledge) is similar in weight and length to the M4 but has 4″ longer barrel, folding adjustable stock and a 42 round magazine.

            The straight up logistic saving on ammunition is 41% weight and 13% volume in spiral 3.

            The 7.62mm MMG/LMG is the next step and is expected to be ready for test fire in fall (2016).

            The TL;DR is that if adopted it’s cheaper in just about every way, the ballistics is slightly better than current ammo and the rechambering allows for a load and/or caliber change at little extra cost, the prototypes are statistically better or equal as they are technology proofs not end products.

          • GeorgeWilliamHerbert

            Not to mention that over time, ammo cost far exceeds weapon procurement, and this drops ammo cost over 50%. It will, if it works, pay for itself rapidly…

          • Joshua

            They’re also pushing 6.5.

          • randomswede

            Is that the official recommendation?
            I know it’s the caliber that they saved the most weight on compared to it’s brass parent (42.8% in the first spiral).

          • buzzman1

            Yes I have read and am aware of everything you wrote. Everything is being done in extremely controlled conditions as they normally would but 85,000 rounds of small batch ammo is still nothing. The Sheridan Scout vehicles caseless ammo was extensively tested and when it was fielded to Vietnam the rounds crumbled in the high humidity. It took years more to perfect the caseless rounds. I may sound overly pessimistic but I have seen way to many worthless items being fielded to the soldier. Many others with greatly exaggerated capabilities. The AR-15 is a prime example. Another is the belted ammo for the M-60 which was originally supposed to come in plastic boxes and to save money the army decided on paper boxes which resulted in jammed weapons in fire fights.

            Besides in the end the idiots in charge will see the reduced ammo weight as an excuse to load more weight onto the soldier.

          • randomswede

            The next step for the LSAT isn’t feilding, it’s going from prototype(s) to a production ready product. The caseless version is (all but) out of the race because it did considerably worse in the tests that they have done, cryo, humidity, dust, etc. And once tooling is produced the real testing can start with production ammo.

            What the penny pinchers will try to do in an effort to wreck the research efforts is as of yet untold and THAT is my fear; that they’ll kill a project that has meet or exceed all parameters (to my knowledge) for the reasons I stated above such as: >>something I’d hear as “We can’t replace this rifle that’s at the end of what it can be after 40 years of evolution with a rifle that’s only marginally better at the beginning of it’s existence”.<<

          • Patriot Gunner

            To my knowledge, the problems I pointed out in my original post still have not been cured. Gas-jetting, horrible barrel life, and the fact that they have to use significantly more powder (in some cases twice as much) to achieve the same ballistic performance of standard ammo. These are problems that are inherent with the design of cased telescoping ammo. Side note, I’d really be interested in seeing the carbine version, I wonder if it is fed from a detachable box magazine.

          • randomswede

            I’m unable to find any info on “gas-jetting”, the breach being poorly sealed?
            Extending the barrel life was part of spiral 3 for the CT round, I have no data on before or after.
            Spiral 1 used the same charge by weight as the M855 and spiral 3 used 10% less charge by weight.

            Google LSAT rifle or LSAT carbine and you’ll find the mockup, there’s a rendition of it in the LSAT wikipedia article as well, I’d link you but that means waiting for the mods. I does indeed use a fairly conventional box magazine, reminds me of a UMP .45 magazine as the case wall is straight and the round ~30% shorter.

          • Patriot Gunner

            Good info, thanks!

          • Patriot Gunner

            Knight’s Armament Co’s 5.56 LMG weighs 9 pounds. 100 rounds of green tip 5.56 weighs approximately 2.7 pounds, add another 1 pound for the nutsack and nato links you get a loaded gun at approximately 12-13 pounds. KAC’s LMG is also utilizes constant recoil making follow-up shots easier. Just saying….

          • randomswede

            That the Stoner 63 didn’t get the same “love” (development time) the AR-15/M16 got is to me a quite sad, I know there were both good and bad reasons for it but it’s still sad.

            I’ll also reiterate that the LSAT LMG is a proof of concept(s) not a weapon ready or intended for production it could lose or gain weight along the path to production, if it ever goes down that path.

          • Patriot Gunner

            Yeah it is pretty sad, from a firearm enthusiast standpoint, that the stoner 63 was abandoned. The special forces in Vietnam loved the rifle.

  • NCJohn

    5300 FPS at the muzzle…Yikes! and 4500+ at 2000m 250Kj at impact..that won’t buff out

    • YOYO BATOU

      “The Armour Piercing Fin Stabilised Discarding Sabot – Tracer (APFSDS-T) is able to penetrate more than 140 mm of RHA (Rolled Homogeneous Armour) at 1500 m.”
      WOWZERS!

    • Edeco

      Interesting. One of my lingering disappointments in (man-portable) firearms is that available practical velocity seems stalled in the low 4,000’s. I know some if not all of the reasons, I mean I’m not baffled by it, but you know, one wants new, better stuff.

      Anyway, militaries using 5000 fps and new cartridge designs is good to see.

      • Giolli Joker

        Steyr IWS 2000
        Just a dead prototype, however.

        • Darren Hruska

          There’s also the Askoriya AMR, another flechette-based anti-materiel “rifle” (IWS 2000 is smoothbore).

      • BigBoBBrown

        Velocities in this auto-cannon are not at all surprising considering the light-for-bore sabots (that have little bearing surface on the actual rifling) from what is an essentially an over-bored barrel (keeping pressures way down). A crapload of TRIPLE-based smokeless lighting off in a barrel of sufficient length does not hurt to achieve these numbers either…

        You can easily exceed 5000 fps in a 300 Win Mag using ~40gr .223″ bullets in .308″ sabots. Sabots are the only way to even tickle these velocities, and to also think about having throat erosion reduced to a somewhat-usable degree, and still that becomes questionable (even with laser etched carbon chrome-lined chamber throat leade yadda yadda) Still what is the point of such velocities from shoulder fired weapons?

        • Edeco

          The point, I mean, I could go through different uses, but I’d rather put it this way: If Hornady came out with 62 grain 5.56×45 ammo that ran at normal pressure, had normal accuracy potential, cost the same, but got 5,000 fps instead of 3,100… people’d be all over it. Few would say “no, I’d rather the 3,100”.

          That of course is impossible, but my point is in and of itself velocity is usually a more-is-more thing.

  • Is the Anti-Ariel Airburst on the far right designed for anti-aircraft use?

    • Mr Mxyzptlk

      Yes. The round detonates slightly short of the target and releases a few hundred tungsten BBs that shred soft targets like a giant shotgun blast. Not sure if it will be supported in the Ajax or Warrior though, I believe that it was designed for the Thales/Nexter/CTA RAPIDFire AA system so my guess is that it might need to be used with that to get a range and program the rounds with their airburst timing.

      Edit: On 2nd thought, I imagine it would work using the same system that the regular airbursting round uses. In that case the limitations for AA use would be the sensors/rangefinder and how fast the turret can track the target.

      • Giolli Joker

        Usually not BBs but tiny cylinders… for improved stacking I guess.

    • YOYO BATOU

      This is what their website says
      “With a longer operational range, very high accuracy and its payload of 200 tungsten pellets, the A3B round provides the 40 CT Weapon System with a highly effective capability resulting in a reduced number of rounds for an effective target kill. The A3B ammunition is particularly effective against UAV, UAS, helicopters and low speed aircraft.”

  • Randomer

    Small point. It is a joint development between BAE Systems and Nexter funded by both the UK and France not a MOTS purchase from the French.

  • Marcus D.

    Perfect for home perimeter defense. When do they hit the civilian market?

  • Joshua

    Personal experiences having had the chance to see how the LSAT LMG functions and the parts in it.

  • Thanks for the video, that is incredibly impressive.

  • buzzman1

    Dave, I have seen a lot of the weapons soldiers have brought back from down range and quite frankly many of the weapons I saw (army wide) of all classes were not maintained well in theater. Lots of soldiers to interested in getting into the MWR tents to play video games and get on Skype. Vehicle Maintenance was even worse.

  • buzzman1

    Funny isnt it how armies around the world got away from light tanks and went to heavy only and now its turned a full circle.

    • ARCNA442

      Umm, no. Despite what the article called it, Ajax is not a tank but a scouting vehicle similar to the US M3 Bradley. In fact, given that the 40 ton Ajax is replacing the 10 ton Scimitar, it is actually an example of how the latest generation of military vehicles are all far heavier and better armed than the current generation.

      • n0truscotsman

        He’s actually correct.

        The light tanks were typically within the 30-40 ton range, carrying 75mm guns including others, capable of roughly similar levels of penetration.

        IFVs are trending more towards the ‘light tank’ concept.

        • ARCNA442

          Light tanks were generally in the 15-30 ton range and Ajax has a 40mm, not 75mm gun. Further, IFV’s are the result of an entirely different doctrine since they carry dismounts and are not intended to directly engage enemy forces.

          • n0truscotsman

            What era you talking? pre-war, war, or post-war? Post-war Light tanks have always traditionally been within that ton range, with lighter exceptions being the air droppable kind.

            And im talking about ballparks of armor penetration, not gun caliber.

            Not intended is far different than ‘actually does’. I recommend reading FM 17-95 for starters http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/policy/army/fm/17-95/index.html

  • Warren Ellis

    How much 40mm CTA ammo can be carried? Because from what I’ve heard, even a jump from 25mm ammo to 30mm ammo creates a good size drop in the amount of ammo that can be carried. So considering the rounds featured here, how much can be carried typically?

    • Its slightly shorter than the current 30mm rarden ammo, but slightly fatter. do to its shape its more volumetrically efficient so I believe they can carry quite a bit of ammo.

      • Warren Ellis

        I wonder if this system could be used for the Stryker or Bradley upgrades, like that unmanned turret one they’re trying for the Bradley?

  • Giolli Joker

    “Futures
    Although work has recently concentrated on bringing the system into
    service CTAI have also carried out a number of studies on larger calibre
    (105mm), guided submunitions and a 12.7mm version.”

    12.7mm version… interesting!!!

  • Leigh Rich

    The UK has to fight the Muzzie uprising in their country.