Remington Ilion NY Plant Tour Part 2

Various Remington 700 Models. These special orders are complete and ready for inspection, packaging and shipping to the customer or police departments.

Various Remington 700 Models. These special orders are complete and ready for inspection, packaging and shipping to the customer or police departments.

Starting where I left off on part one of the Ilion, Ny Remington plant tour let’s move on shotguns and a short tour of the rifle area and what goes into parts making and assembly of these guns.

One assembly line I saw was very welcome sight and that was the V3 shotgun. The V3 is the newest shotgun Remington has released. V3 Post
It never ceases to amaze me how quickly an experienced team on the line can put a gun together and test it. Assembly and function test takes right at five minutes tops. The assembly starts with the barrel, sight installation, magazine tube attached to the barrel. This is then mated with the receiver after the second worker attaches the buttstock to the receiver. The magazine tube spring is installed along with the standard parts used in feeding and ejecting rounds such as the trigger group. Finally the action of the semi auto is checked after the shotgun is lubed. A ticket is filled out with the serial number, date and who signed off on it. The shotgun is then placed in a rolling rack. When the rack is full it’s moved to another area where it’s inspected again and then boxed for shipping.

Types of Loctite used on threads and other parts of the V3

Types of Loctite used on threads and other parts of the V3

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Magazine tube

Magazine tube

magazine tube. barrel and gas system shown.

magazine tube. barrel and gas system shown.

Installing the trigger group

Installing the trigger group

Trigger groups waiting for installation

Trigger groups waiting for installation

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Completed shotguns in the rack waiting for inspection and packaging.

Completed shotguns in the rack waiting for inspection and packaging.

Let’s talk barrels and show the process of creating and finishing them. The photo caption tells the story.Before we get into barrels let’s look at the raw material for an 870 receiver.

Blocks of raw material for shotgun receivers. One raw block shown next to a partially completed receiver. Each raw block weighs over 20 pounds.

Blocks of raw material for shotgun receivers. One raw block shown next to a partially completed receiver. Each raw block weighs over 20 pounds.

Finishes

Finishes

Boring the shotgun barrel gauge and shaping the external dimensions.

Boring the shotgun barrel gauge and shaping the external dimensions.

Same machine from a different angle and stage of completion.

Same machine from a different angle and stage of completion.

After sizing and buffing the internal part of the barrel

After sizing and buffing the internal part of the barrel

An older welder that spot welds and attaches the rib to the shotgun barrel

An older welder that spot welds and attaches the rib to the shotgun barrel

installed rib on barrel

installed rib on barrel

Buffing the shotgun receiver.

Buffing the shotgun receiver.

Buffing a barrel. This worker has been doing this same job for 30 years!

Buffing a barrel. This worker has been doing this same job for 30 years!

Laser engraving the receiver.

Laser engraving the receiver.

After touring the shotgun and Marlin area we moved up one floor to the rifle manufacturing and assembly area.We were running out of time so we couldn’t cover as much of this area.

Working on a 700 VTR barrel

Working on a 700 VTR barrel

Model 700 barrel and action

Model 700 barrel and action

Rifle assembly line

Rifle assembly line

Various Remington 700 Models. These special orders are complete and ready for inspection, packaging and shipping to the customer or police departments.

Various Remington 700 Models. These special orders are complete and ready for inspection, packaging and shipping to the customer or police departments.

As I mentioned earlier we only had one day to cover the entire 1,000,000 square feet as well as the museum. That said we were unable to do as much coverage of the rifle area as we would have liked. Also at the time we were there the DOD area was off limits. They were doing some long range firing underground in the old Erie canal range. Of course anytime you deal with a DOD area you have to follow the government rules which are always more strict than the company rules.

I would like to thank all of the special people we met who create these Remington shotguns and rifles and have devoted their lives to making a quality product. These workers and supervisors really do bleed green and are the heart and soul of the company. Everyone we met was very accommodating and helpful in answering our questions and showing us the areas they work in. I would also like to thank all of the management team and J. Kallum who set this tour up and took care of us in seeing things we were interested in as well as briefing us on the company structure as well as future plans for Ilion. It really was a fascinating place to see with the old mixed in with the new. You can just feel the history as you walk through the plant.

I hope all of our readers have enjoyed the articles on the museum, the company history and the Ilion facility as a whole. I’ll conclude the articles with the next part of the tour when we arrive in Huntsville, Al. I hope you enjoy it as well.

“SOME HISTORICAL AND HUMAN FACTS ABOUT THE BIRTH AND GROWTH OF THE FIREARMS INDUSTRY AT ILION, NEW YORK”


Phil White

Retired police officer with 30 years of service. Firearms instructor and SRU team member. I still instruct with local agencies. My daily carry pistol is the tried and true 1911. I’m the Associate Editor and moderator at TFB. I really enjoy answering readers questions and comments. We can all learn from each other about our favorite hobby!


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  • JamesRPatrick

    Interesting that they spot weld the ribs instead of brazing.

    • There are actually two machines for that. One is older than the other by about 25 years or so. I asked why they used these older machines and the answer was a new machine didn’t do a better job and wasn’t faster so as long as it did a good job they would most likely keep using it.

  • nadnerbus

    There’s something kind of fascinating about seeing a block of metal turned into a functioning machine. Literally a chunk of basic raw material is shaped and machined into a specialized part that does a function, all through the application of knowledge and work. It is kind of art, in a way.

    • I agree it is art. Even using CNC machines or the many others in the plant you have to have real talent to operate them in a way you have a precision tool when it’s all said and done. It’s also very interesting to watch the start of the process right up to completion. The men and women have done this work so much watching their hands they just fly!

      • iksnilol

        I just stick to learning 3d-printing now. Nice way to learn soldering and get experience with basic circuitry πŸ™‚

        Can’t afford a machine shop you see πŸ˜›

  • Colin

    Is the Rem Csr 308 carbon fibre break down rifle from 2014 ever going to be released ?

    • Colin I’ve never asked about that one. I didn’t see anything along those lines at the plant. Right now they are more wrapped up in getting the R51 thing taken care of and improving the basics. The emphasis isn’t super high on new gun designs right now. That doesn’t mean it won’t happen with that one or others I’ve heard about but I wouldn’t expect to see anything new until at least late this year.

  • DaveK

    Can someone explain to me what niche the V3 is supposed to fill that the 11-87 does not? Both lines are in the same ballpark in terms of price, both are gas-operated semi-autos, neither take 3.5″ shells. Okay, the V3 is lighter and is available with wood furniture but I’m not seeing any other differences beyond that. What am I missing here?

    • A few things maybe. The gas system is very close to the receiver and because of that the balance is great. It’s lighter weight is from the shorter receiver and smaller gas system. I have one ordered with wood furniture just because I like wood on my shotguns. I wouldn’t be surprised to see a tactical model or models as well as the hunting models. That is about all I’ve got to pass along right now.

      • DaveK

        Even if it is well-balanced is it that much better balanced than the 11-87?

        • DaveK

          Phil, I’m not sure what you ordered exactly but the V3 does NOT come with wood furniture, the 11-87 does. My bad.

          • The V3 comes in black of course as well as Mossy Oak, Break Up Country as you see on the Remington website. They will have wood furniture as well. They think it will sell well since there seems to be a resurgence in interest of traditional guns fitted out with wood furniture.
            They just haven’t shown it as an option yet.
            I’ll have to look for the photo if I can find it. We get handouts for new products that has information not to be released just yet. Summer could be interesting:-)

            They are also reintroducing the 870 with wood which I’ll for sure get down the road sometime.
            http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2015/10/23/potd-new-remington-870-wood-furniture/

          • DaveK

            Reintroducing? The 870 with wood never left the 870 lineup.

          • CountryRock

            They’ve gone back to the solid birch stocks and done away with the crappy laminate stocks. Also the above picture appears to be the new Hardwood Home Defense variant of the 870.

        • Not a huge amount but enough I noticed it right away shooting clays when I had to move to a second clay. I also should have mentioned the adjustable stock which helps.