All American Manufactured Vortex Razor HD AMG

Vortex Razor HD AMG

There was plenty of pre-shot show prep for the various optics manufacturers around the world, but the new Razor AMG snuck up on us. Even before the show I was being told they had “something exciting in the works that probably wouldn’t be ready for Shot.”

But here it is!

The Razor HD AMG is 100% American made. Not assembled in the US. Not using US components and offshore glass. 100% American made.

Those cool cats over a Snipers Hide got a sneak peek at the process, and put together a pretty flashy music/manufacturing video. Check it out:

I took a close look at the Razor while on the show floor, and was impressed. I generally like the Razor line of optics. If you’ve got the cash to spend, they’re top notch.

Beyond the all-American label, it’s very similar in fit and finish to the Razor Gen II optics. Same goes for the clarity and sharpness in the glass and reticle. The Razor line is getting pretty full these days, between Gen I, Gen II, the new lightweight models, and with this new AMG, there’s lots to choose from.

Vortex Razor HD AMG

The AMG is a 6-24 power optic with a 50mm front lens and first focal plane objective. For the uninitiated first focal plane means that the crosshairs zoom with the magnification, so your hash-marks and substenstions are consistent at all powers. The AMG weighs in at 28.8 oz, which is well under the 35oz Gen I and 48oz Gen II Razors. This unit does have an adjustable parallax, and 3.6″ of eye-relief at the full 24x power.

There will be two versions of the AMG hitting shelves later this year (Vortex says mid-Summer) one with an MOA reticle and the other using Milrad. Both scopes are forecasted to carry at $3,999 price tag, matching the Gen II 4-27 optic. Some other key stats if you’re a scope junkie are below.

  • Field of View 20.4-5.1 feet/100 yards
  • Adjustment Graduation 1/4 MOA
  • Travel per Rotation 25 MOA
  • Max Elevation Adjustment 96 MOA
  • Max Windage Adjustment 65 MOA


Edward O

Edward is a Canadian gun owner and target shooter with a Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism. Crawling over mountains with tactical gear is his idea of fun. He blogs at TV-Presspass and tweets @TV_PressPass.


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  • JumpIf NotZero

    Biggest feature is they finally got the weight down! 28oz not only competitive it’s on the lower end competitively. That 48oz morbidly obese monster they had was a none starter.

    Reticle without the tree would be amazing. Although it’s certainly still better than most.

    I find it hard to believe this won’t be a strong consideration for my next scope.

  • G0rdon_Fr33man

    Never understood why made in the US was a selling point by itself.

    • Joseph B Campbell

      At one time “American Made” was the best on the market! Nowadays foreign manufacturers can make some high quality stuff at a lower price. They usually accomplish this by exploiting their employees to a mean extent!

      • JeremyS

        The only difference is it seems like “American Made” stuff just holds up better. I know overseas stuff is decent and cheaper, but seems like there is a lower standard of quality. I guess depending on where its made. Some of the more expensive stuff seems legit.

        • Phil Hsueh

          It depends a lot on who’s selling it. For instance, the house brand optics sold by Primary Arms have a pretty good rep and while they may not be as good as some of the big name brand Made in the US stuff out there they are a great deal for the price you’re paying and a lot of shooters swear by them.

      • Phil Hsueh

        That’s true, to a degree. You also have to take into consideration the cost of living in some of these countries, what seems like a pittance to us here in the US and Europe is actually a good wage in some of these countries and actually better pay and work conditions than other employers in their country.

      • Kivaari

        Americans learned some important lessons from having competition. When they (insert country name here) build a better car or scope or rifle, we need to do so, or lose the market. One of the best things to happen was the import of Japanese cars. Look how American makers had t adapt or get left in the dust.

    • Phil Hsueh

      I never understood that myself either, for some reason people seem to think that it automatically means that it’s good. Sort of like how people think that gluten free means that something is healthy.

      • G0rdon_Fr33man

        Personally I associate German or Swiss made with top-of-the-line quality and a hefty price tag. American made in my mind means lowest bidder… Good for the money, but not by any stretch the best. “Made in the USA” are also, unfortunately, used very dishonestly, with all the snake-oil-products out there…

        • Phil Hsueh

          I think that it depends a lot on the type of product you’re talking about. Definitely Swiss and German for optics, I’ve never associated the US with top optics, at least not in terms of the glass but some of the made in China stuff isn’t too bad these days, not top notch but good budget stuff. American made usually means high price tag and good or decent quality in terms of tactical clothing and gear but for most people, the stuff made overseas is good enough and will save a lot of money, but people want the stuff used by the top Spec Ops units and so they’re happy to overpay for gear that they’re only going to wear out to the range.

          To me, it doesn’t matter that much wear something is made, it’s more important who is selling/makes it (and their rep) and it’s at a price that I can afford. I don’t have that much money to spend on my toys and I know that I’m not going to need it to go out fighting IS or anybody like them so I don’t need top tier gear and I’m more than happy with good enough for going out to the range and glamping.

          • Kivaari

            A good amount of the “tactical gear” from American companies is made in Vietnam. They take the name associated with high quality products 30 years ago, and trade off it today.
            The best tactical vests I saw used were worn by ATF agents. Even the ID patches were of superior quality. We get what we are willing to pay for. Since ATF is spending our money, they go first class.

      • Kivaari

        I get a kick out of people thinking being made in Germany is some how a great thing. Germans can make junk just like every other place can build junk. If you want good quality, place of manufacture isn’t a real important feature. Optics companies can make whatever price level the customer wants. What I don’t get is why don’t most scopes use higher grade materials and designs. Every 3-9x scope has pretty much the same parts. Why can one scope be $75 and the other $4000? Do lens glues and seals vary that much? I’ve seen expensive Swarovski scopes and binoculars fail like a Tasco. Reverse engineering a great scope should be easy. Anodizing aluminum scope tubes should be the same. Can 6 ounces of aluminum really cost so much that the price increases by $1000? Junk at any price is junk. But buying expensive stuff doesn’t ensure it wont fail. Yes, I’ve seen the difference in clarity between Leupold VXII and VXIII and Mk 6 and 8. I just don’t know why it should cost so much.

        • Phil Hsueh

          To me, German engineering/made means something that’s overengineered and overpriced and not necessarily better. It’s like the myth of German tanks and other tools of war being vastly superior to the Allies during WW II when it’s anything but the truth. German tanks were good up through the PzKpfw IV and (arguably) the Panther but Tigers and subsequent variants were deadly but way over engineered, time consuming, and expensive to produce, and were horribly unreliable in the field. Their pistols were also overengineered and prone to jamming when they got a bit dirty, I actually just watched a video in where a passage from a book written Otto Skorzeny was read and in it he praises the virtues of the Sten and how reliable it and how unreliable their SMGs and did not like getting dirty.

          • Kivaari

            You have it correct. I am thankful that the Germans were so stupid. Thy wasted resources across the board – and time was a resource they really didn’t use well. About the best ting they produced was the K98k and the 88mm HV projectile. Even in the 88, they did not have a proximity fuse, as we did. Making the artty hits more effective when fired at high angle. A timed fuse just wasn’t reliable.
            Tank engines had so many machining steps that led to a faulty engine. The giant tank and giant airplane were underpowered and became easy targets. We learned that if you build an anti-tank gun to match the enemies tanks, you need to go another step, to stop the next generation.

      • Kivaari

        “Gluten free” means it is tasteless and has poor texture. It’s healthier because you wont eat unless its the only thing in the house and you’ve been out of real food for 2 weeks.

    • Timothy G. Yan

      Looking for .gov/.mil contracts that require 100% ‘Merican made and willing to pay stupid $ for it.

      • G0rdon_Fr33man

        That makes a lot of sense. Does that perhaps mean Vortex will be trying to capture marketshare from Nightforce?

        • Bill

          Yes.

      • Bill

        Berry Compliant.

    • anon

      When it comes to optics, I trust Made in Japan or Made in Europe way more than Made in USA. Same thing with firearms.

  • JeremyS

    I’m interested to hear about the glass. I didn’t think the US made high quality glass. I thought that it had to be German or European?

    • G0rdon_Fr33man

      If the glass indeed IS made in the US, as I assume it is. It will be interesting to compare to European Optics in the same price range. That is after all Swarowski-prices.

      • Bill

        In thinking about it, I’m not sure what company in the US has the ability to make glass that is that high-grade. Maybe whoever made the second set of mirrors for the Hubble.

        • Kivaari

          Leupold

          • Bill

            They do their own glass? It’s good, but I’m not sure it’s Leica/Leitz good.

          • Kivaari

            Look at the upscale Mk 6 and Mk 8 scopes. They are damn good, and should be when they are $3000-4000. Good sand in gets better glass out. 40 years ago Weaver scopes were known as having a brown tint. After years of using the same glass, they asked the supplier. He told them for 5 cents more they could have better glass. It finally made Weaver as clear as a Bushnell or Tasco. Leupold knows their stuff. I just don’t think a scope that sells for $3000 should sell for $3000. I don’t think it takes so much extra to push a $300 scope to give the high end performance. I suspect it comes down to how much the customers are willing to pay for the perceived increase in quality. OK, I don’t know what the fine lens’ cost to make or why seals can be some much better than what others use. Like many products the price has little to do with what it costs to make. It just has to offer what is wanted and how much we will spend. Times have changed. I remember paying $45 for Colt M1911A1 pistols and $35 for P38 war trophies.

    • Bill

      Leica and Zeiss come to mind.

  • Bill

    Maybe, then ITAR, it’s one of them.

    • Jeff S

      ITAR is for exports.

  • Laserbait

    Awesome! So looking forward to this!