CrossBreed Makes a New Speed Loader Case

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CrossBreed Holsters has teamed up with renowned gunsmith Grant Cunningham to make a new speed loader case. Cunningham is well known for his precision work on revolvers; so well known, in fact, there’s a two-year wait right now for those interested in benefiting from his work. He also works as a revolver instructor and says his primary teaching goal is that students finish a class simply having improved their skills in some way. Revolvers are Cunningham’s life, and that makes him an ideal designer to work with CrossBreed on this new case.

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If you have a semi-auto, there are myriad options out there for spare mag holders, but those with revolvers are more limited. And since revolvers hold fewer rounds than the average semi-auto, they tend to be in need of a reload more often, making speed loaders an absolute necessity. Accessing that speed loader is another story; enter Grant Cunningham.

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The CrossBreed Speed Loader Case grips your speed loader firmly and makes mounting it to your belt easy. The case is made of high quality tanned leather and fastens to your belt in an upright position with the speed loader itself resting against your side. Right now it’s designed for .38/.357 speed loaders; down the road maybe they’ll expand the product line to fit a wider range of calibers. The case can be concealed by pulling an untucked shirt over it or wearing a jacket.

Although CrossBreed says the case makes it possible to access your speed loader with, well, speed, they don’t say how easily the case is opened. Judging by photographs alone it appears the case is closed with snaps both at the belt and at the top of the speed loader itself; whether or not those snaps can be opened with one hand is impossible to know. It’s obvious the position is good and that it can be concealed, but it isn’t obvious how quickly your extra rounds can actually be accessed in a high-stress situation.

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On the surface, this seems like a good idea, but I’d like to find out for myself how quickly it can be opened, if it can be opened with one hand, and whether the speed loader can easily fall while you’re opening the case if you don’t keep a hold on it at all times. It’s not hard to imagine a scenario where you’re unsnapping the case with one hand and the speed loader simply drops to the ground. When you’re under duress you need your equipment to cover certain bases, and that includes the need for the speed loader to not simply fall when the snap is opened. Accessibility is great, but it isn’t enough on its own.

What do you think?

Specs:

Size: 3.75”x2.00”x2.00”

Weight: 2 ounces

Color: Cowhide Black and Horsehide Natural

MSRP: $36.95

See it for yourself at: http://www.crossbreedholsters.com/HotcakesStore/ProductViewer/tabid/113/slug/Speedloader-Case/Default.aspx



katie.ainsworth

Katie is an avid shooter, hunter, military journalist, and Southern girl. Firearms are her passion whether at the range or on a spot-and-stalk after a big buck. She’s a staff writer at The Firearm Blog and writes about guns, hunting, and the military for various publications both online and in print such as Outdoor Life, Handguns, and Shooting Illustrated. Shoot her a message at ainsworth.kat@usa.com


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  • Paul O.

    Looks like you open it with your off hand thumb and the loader would fall into your hand. Gravity is your friend with revolver loading! Hopefully, Crossbreed will follow up with a 6 shot version.

  • Full Name

    It’s on the wrong side. Effective speedloading of a revolver involves transferring the gun to the left hand while digging out the speedloader with your right hand.

    • Bill

      Concur. Wheel guns can be loaded while being kept in the weapon hand, but years of experience indicate that transferring it to the reactionary hand works the most best, most of the time.

      Speed comes from mastering a technique, whether the technique is good or less than good. And I don’t know of a single gunfight won by speed of reload.

  • The Real Teal’c

    If I’m gonna wear that, I want some bling on it. Gotta match the westcoast choppers bracelets.

    • Beaumont

      Are you familiar with the term “non sequitur”?

  • Beaumont

    Absolutely. You want to maintain your grip on the gun. And since the majority of revolver cylinders open to the left, transferring the revolver to the left hand (for a right-handed shooter) makes the reload slower and more complex.

  • Charles Topping

    Looks like a good thing, but looks can be deceptive. Would love to be able to try one in several sets of circumstances before I paid CrossBreeds price for one.

  • Bill

    I’ll try one, but I’d like to know why the manufacturer/designer thinks its a better solution than what we already have