New Concept: “See All Open Sight” Fiber Optic Self-Contained Sight

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Its not every day that we see a new concept for weapon sights. The See All Open Sight from See All Open Sights (original company name, eh?) is a new concept and product that combines elements of fiber-optic, iron, and dot sighting systems.

The SAOS is 100% American-made and mounts to all standard 1913-style rails. It weights less than 2 ozs. (1.8 to be exact) and requires not batteries. SAOS claims that the SAOS will survive and thrive even mounted to pistol slides or on any weapon with demanding recoil.

I got a chance to go hands-on at SHOT. First thing I noticed was the SAOS is tiny and has negligible weight. The company had pistols and shotguns with the system mounted for people to try. Personally, I found it hard to pick on a pistol, and believe the sight is at home on a shotgun or short-range rifle.

TFB will request one for review and run it through our wringer. Until then, MrGunsNGear’s review will bring you up to speed:

The SAOS from SAOS retails for $98.95. You can buy it direct or through local dealers. 

What are your thoughts? A solid improvement over basic or fiber-optic iron-sights or an over-priced gimmick?


Nathan S.

TFB’s newest resident Jarhead, Nathan is currently working in the Defense industry in international sales. A consecutive Marine rifle and pistol expert, he enjoys local 3-gun, bull-pups, and high-speed gear. Nathan has traveled to over 30 countries in the last three years working with US DoD & foreign MoDs. You will likely find him either in an international airport or on the local range in NE Indiana.

Nathan can be reached at [email protected]


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  • Rich

    Looks decent. But, it also seems expensive for what you get, and it has a lot of sharp corners.

    • erwos

      If it works as well as advertised, a hundred bucks seems pretty reasonable. No batteries, tough as nails, fast as a red dot, surprisingly precise… I guess it’d be nice if it had an LED to make it useful at night, but such is life.

      • ReManG

        Join the discussion…

        • ReManG

          I used a couple of strips of the strontium aluminate glow tape on the inside of the body on my SAOS. This provides rechargeable illumination that is sufficient enough for most low light situations. The brand was GlowOn, but any super phosphoresce tape would work. The sight is not like anything else, there is no parralax, so once sighted in, anyone can pick up your arm and hit to point of aim with the SAOS…..

    • Mark N.

      My thought as well. The recently posted red dot sight review had the Bushnell at top rated at the same price point as this. And looking at it, this cannot be expensive to manufacture. Is the glass even glass, or is it plastic like the rest of the sight? Seems to me this should retail in the $35 to $590 range.

      • Steve Truffer

        Steel, glass, and an edge-glow element (think fiber optic in a non fiber shape)

        • Chris

          So… I just ordered one on amazon, and it shipped yesterday… do you figure it has the logo, or not…?

          • Steve Truffer

            It will most likely have it, when I contacted them, they said the next batch would be sans-logo on the element

      • ReManG

        Sure, $35 to $59 range, but it is milled aluminum and a patented aiming system, I cant blame someone for wanting some money for an original idea. The thing is, some polymer back up sights run this much, as do all steel non tritium pistol sights, etc, etc… It beats a red dot for me and what I wanted it for…..

  • Luke Hasse III

    I run one at a 45deg offset on my 3 gun open rifle. I’m really pleased with it. I can pickup the target just as fast as with a red dot, and it’s a lot less expensive than any other quality, always on, red dot options.

    • Nicholas C

      Does this sight put you in Open? Or would it be considered an iron sight?

      • Luke Hasse III

        I’m already in open because of my saiga shotgun. I would assume this sight would be considered an optic and not an open sight due to it’s use of an optical lense. If that is the case , using it as a secondary sighting system would put you in open.

  • rbrush

    I have one which I have yet to really use, but one thing to note is that the words “See-All” positioned under the sight triangle can be a bit distracting.

    • iksnilol

      Cover it up with tape, electricians tape should work well.

      • Steve Truffer

        It has been removed in later batches

  • iksnilol

    Why not make one with a dot in the middle? Could work for long range.

    How tall is it?

  • jimmarch

    Let’s see…if I’m building a ghetto scout rifle on a starting point that doesn’t have iron sights, all I need is an over-length rail and mount this either before or after the scope? Can’t co-witness but that’s not the point – if the main glass fails pull it and the gun is still useful with this.

    Veeeeery interesting.

    As to handgun usage, no, I’d rather have a Goshen Hexsite. Works even better than this (especially in low light) and is also a target-focus setup.

  • Ramsey

    There is a good review of this sight at pyramyd (sic) air’s airgun blog.

  • Yellow Devil

    I actually first saw this yesterday on (I believe) TTAG blog about someone refitting their Mosin Nagant Rifle and they placed this sight on top. It looks intriguing, I hope they are successful enough to branch out to other designs in the future.

    • http://www.thefirearmblog.com/ Nathan S ” Staff Writer, TFB”

      Yep, that article is what reminded me of it!

  • AD

    I think this would be brilliant (especially on pistols) if it was lower – it looks to me like you should be able to make it about as low as pistol iron sights, at least if you didn’t have a built-in mount (you might not get as much range in elevation adjustment?). That way you would be getting some of the advantages of a dot sight with most of the advantages of iron sights, which sounds very cool to me. I am really tempted to pick one up and give it a try.

  • jimmarch

    The reason I still like the Hexsite concept over this is that in my study of how the Hexsite works (the other known target-focus iron sight) there’s a really weird factor as to how our brains work.

    To fully understand go to youtube and look up an old episode of the science show “Nova” titled “Secrets of the Mind”. The second case studied in there is of a guy with “blindsight” – there’s nothing wrong with his eyes, but the main visual processing center at the back of his head is damaged. That’s the “graphics processor” you’re using right now to read this text, or recognize faces or whatever. You have conscious access to it.

    But there’s a second visual processor available. It’s “older” in evolutionary terms, and is at the top of your head. It’s sometimes known as the “reptilian” visual processor. It has interesting characteristics:

    1) It is great at spotting motion.

    2) Fast as hell.

    3) Wired straight to your muscles for emergency usage.

    4) ONLY SEES IN BLACK AND WHITE.

    5) Better ability to deal with low-light processing.

    6) You have no conscious access to the “feed” from it.

    So people with damaged primary visual processing centers (at the rear of the head) can walk down the street, navigate, dodge a thrown rock(!) but can’t tell you how they’re doing it, and they can’t rear, see faces, etc. Very weird. They have the visual processing abilities of a lizard.

    When I use a Hexsite, I can line the gun up on target, focus on the target, look to another target and the gun will track behind my vision without me being aware of it or even knowing how it’s happening. Because being purely black and white, no colors (and a strong effort made to avoid “glinting” of light, anywhere) there’s nothing to prevent it’s use by the older visual processing center.

    What ends up happening is, aiming isn’t something you have to think about – at all. You just look at things and decide to pull the trigger when necessary.

    I am concerned that the green in the “See All” will get in the way of this process, which I really like a lot in the Hexsite.

    http://www.goshen-hexsite.com/index2.php

    And yeah, for the record, the sights on “Maurice” are “Hexsite family” based on an unpublished design by Tim Sheehan which is why I can’t publish pics of what it looks like down the tube. Tim has let me make homebrew near-copies of his work on my oddball gun for years now and what’s on there now is the “Goshdarn Hacksite Mk5″ :).

    • http://www.thefirearmblog.com/ Nathan S ” Staff Writer, TFB”

      As a Psychology major for my undergrad, this is a fascinating concept.

      We will reach out to Hexsite and ask for a sample to review.

      • jimmarch

        See my recent reply to wetcorps…

      • Gene

        Please do, and compare xontrast the two sights, if possible. I’d like to see a pro/con of each. They both seem interesting.

        • jimmarch

          They are both target-focus iron sights. Target-focus instead of front-sight-focus *rocks*. I think the Hexsite gets there better but both are at least barking up the right tree, and if you only have a short mounting location this has merit. I think it could be improved some, as well…like go to a plain black’n’white variant.

    • wetcorps

      I learned something today. Thanks :)

      • jimmarch

        The thing is, we buy sights based on what they look like with our consciously-accessible visual processor.

        :)

        It’s kinda like how fishing lures are designed to look good to fishermen when in fact they should look good to a FISH. While it’s in the water. :)

        But in this case with the Hexsite, while I may not be able to understand what’s going on in the more primitive visual processor directly, I can “feel” what’s going on. All I have to do is unload the gun (which on Maurice is a bit…”involved”) and point it at one corner of a room, lined up in my usual Weaver hold, and then swing over to another corner. And the gun is there, and I don’t remember putting it there. But it’s dead on.

        The secondary visual processor is directly controlling my arms, to a degree. Without me thinking about it. It’s absolutely bizarre the first few times…like you can hear some geriatric ghost going “use the Force!” or somedangthing.

        Completely freaky.

        Want weirder?

        Remember I said the secondary processor can work at lower light levels? Well when I was at Tim’s large shop one night, he had the whole place lit with one small bulb in the far corner. He had me sight up on something in another corner that was barely lit enough for me to identify a target at. I couldn’t see the sights at all (and this was using real Goshen Hexsites on a blue gun replica versus the “Hacksite”).

        He then had me freeze while he hit the sights with a flashlight.

        They were dead on. I couldn’t see or use the sights with my conscious visual processor, but I *could* see them with the unconscious one!!!

        Holy crap.

        So…I am convinced 100% that the trend in fiber optic, tritium and other colored glowing sights is the wrong answer. It turns out we should “use the force”…or more accurately, the secondary visual processor which can do things we don’t fully understand. Certainly not at a gut level because we cannot bring data from it into the sentient part of our brains.

        NOW, with all that said, the “See All” could have it’s color changed to pure black and white and *might* gain some advantages that way. And it has an interesting advantage of it’s own – it’s short! So it doesn’t need a forward mounted sight of any sort even on a long gun for basic usage. To me that makes it damned interesting as a backup iron on a tactical rifle in some applications, set either ahead of or behind a quick-detach scope or off to the side on a 45deg offset rail.

        • Giolli Joker

          Very interesting, thanks.
          Do you think the same target acquisition process can be obtained even with red dot sights or do you believe that the dot “tricks” the brain somehow slowing down the instinctive approach?

        • AD

          Now I really want to try the Hexsite!

        • Mark N.

          I believe what they say about the Hexsite, but their website says the rifle sites (double hexsite) are available only to large buyers and military. And they are pricey. And I haven’t figured out why their are two hexs on the rifle instead on one hex and a post, like a ghost ring setup.

    • mikewest007

      Wow, they’re willing to cater to airsofters too? I’m interested. Not sure if I want to put the Hecksight on my pimped 1911 or build something new off the Marui HiCapa platform, though.

    • Leigh Rich

      What am I missing here? Thought this had to do with a SAOS. Not a pricey little pistol Hexsite.

  • Steve Truffer

    Putting the logo on the “glass” is a big no-no.

    • Leigh Rich

      Just ordered it today..see which batch I get.

  • allannon

    It looks interesting.

    The biggest weakness would seem to be low-light performance, which seems not to be an issue if you run a light. I wonder if a mini watch battery and a dim LED could be added.

    I’d be a bit worried about the columnator breaking or getting scratched; I wonder why they haven’t put a bit of a hood over the rear part of the optic.

    Still and all, seems like something that would be nice on a shotgun or close-in type carbine, like a truck gun.

  • erwos

    I was thinking about this more, and it looks like it could be really handy either mounted at 45 degrees or on top of a prism sight. You’re usually using an RMR or Micro type sight for that kind of thing, but this seems cheaper and about as useful.

    • mig1nc

      That’s a good point. This could be quite nice as a 45^ offset site on a 3-gun rifle. I wonder… Would this put you in open class as a dual “optic” or would it count as a normal fiber optic site?

  • Kendal Black

    The See All is ingenious. It is the lower half of an occluded eye gunsight (OEG). Because the top is cut away, both eyes have a view of the target area, eliminating the phoria effect of previous OEG sights. That is the effect responsible for the wandering dot problem that can mess up your POA/POI with older types of OEG’s. Some good thinking there!

  • gunsandrockets

    Hmm… very interesting.

    I wonder how well it works in conditions where the shooter is firing from a dark environment towards a brightly illuminated target such as from indoors towards an outdoors target in bright daylight? I suspect it works pretty well.

    SAOS seems like a solution to the limitations of the old OEG sight. I remember handling an OEG and sighting directly at a bright overhead light, yet the aiming dot was still clearly visible. Of course the OEG required keeping both eyes open and it was easy to witness the dot wander if your vision wasn’t keenly focused on target. Not the kind of sight you wanted for precise deliberate fire, but seemed like just the ticket for rapid aimed fire.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collimator_sight

  • Leigh Rich

    I like it. No batteries and decent price on the See All Open Sight. Great review. I just ordered one.

  • http://www.gunmate.com.au/ Aaron Mulligan

    Awesome! This looks like interesting. Yes maybe a bit pricey but I guess this “See All Open Sight” is worth the price. Thanks for the great review. :)

  • Leigh Rich

    Here is mine mounted atop a green laser on my AR 15 pistol top rail. I really like the site!!

    http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r576/rogertc2/Arpistolsights_zps5be0d597.jpg