Anschütz MSR RX22 Now On Sale

MSR_RX22_Precision

I has taken over two years, but finally the Anschütz MSR RX22 is hitting US shores. The gun is being imported by Steyr Arms and being sold for $895 for the standard black and desert colored models (below), and $995 for the precision model (top).

MSR_RX22_Precision_Black MSR_RX22_Tan

From the press release …

After a long wait for American consumers, Anschütz Sporting Arms has delivered a substantial shipment of its much sought after MSR RX22 small-bore tactical training rifles to Steyr Arms, the exclusive importer of the rifle. This shipment included the popular Desert and Black Hawk models, as well as the extremely rare Precision and Precision Black models—all of which are currently shipping to distributers and dealers around the country.

World-renowned for its gold-medal winning competitive rifles, Anschütz introduced the MSR RX22 last year, but until now, demand has far exceeded availability. Featuring a target barrel and a competition-inspired trigger, the MSR RX22 is certainly no plinker. Rather, it’s a full-featured, precision .22-caliber training and small-game hunting rifle.

The MSR RX22 was developed from the ground up as an extremely accurate semi-automatic .22-cal. rifle with excellent shooting performance that is suitable for the intense requirements of most shooting disciplines as well as semi-auto precision shooting. The MSR RX22 offers an extremely accurate self-loading rifle platform with excellent shooting performance and exceptional reliability. This new Anschütz rifle operates on a force-locking blowback action system with a hammer lock.

The MSR RX22 barrels are manufactured to the same exacting tolerances of Anschütz’ target barrels with a special button-rifling process, and the barrel features a recessed target crown. The single-stage trigger’s components are hardened and finely ground to produce a fast trigger with a very consistent release. The trigger is factory set at 4 lbs. and can be adjusted from 3.3 to 5.5 lbs. by the user.

The MSR RX22 was designed for ease of use for either a left- or right-handed shooter. The cocking handle can be quickly located to any of three positions on either side of the rifle for a total of six possible cocking-handle locations. The trigger-locking safety is easily engaged by way of a large selector switch, familiar to most tactical centerfire rifles on either side of the receiver.

The MSR RX22 is available in four versions. The Desert and Black Hawk models feature a side-folding stock that is collapsible for length of pull and adjustable for cheek weld, and they have Picatinny rails on the side and bottom of the foreend for attaching accessories. The Precision and Precision Black models have fixed wooden stocks and foreend components. All MSR RX22 rifles have a full-length Picatinny rail on top for mounting the included flip-up iron sights as well as your choice of optics.

The MSR RX22 comes equipped with one 10-round polymer detachable single-stack magazine. Magazines with capacities of 2, 5, 20 and 22 rounds are also available as accessory items. The suggested retail price of the standard Desert and Black Hawk models is $895. MSRP for the Precision and the Precision Black models is $995.


Steve Johnson

Founder and Dictator-In-Chief of TFB. A passionate gun owner, a shooting enthusiast and totally tacti-uncool. Favorite first date location: any gun range. Steve can be contacted here.


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  • JT

    I don’t get it. $900 for a semi auto .22

    • mikee

      Yep! $900 for a semi-auto .22. Why? Because US citizens can own macho bling .22 semi-autos as a fashion accessory. Its just another .22. Too bad its doesn’t come with chrome mags!!

    • comatus

      Or, only $900 for an Anschutz. Take a browse through their catalogue.

  • big daddy

    Is it me or are the sights on backward?

    • http://www.thefirearmblog.com/ Phil W “Senior Writer TFB”

      The front sight is I believe

  • DiverEngrSL17K

    Unless you are a professional or hard-core competition target shooter, and are looking to buy the ultimate modular .22 auto practice rifle / carbine that offers ( almost ) everything you would want without going through the extra work of a custom build, there doesn’t seem to be much justification to pay that much for such a weapon — especially when there are several lower-cost alternatives already backed by a huge aftermarket that is geared to cater to nearly every preference.

    Knowing Anschutz, though, I’m reasonably sure that it’s a high-quality, accurate, perfectly-balanced and ergonomic gun that will feel “just right” for most shooters straight out of the box. It remains to be seen if this gun is sufficiently better than the alternatives that it becomes worth the extra initial cost to the rest of us.

    • http://www.thefirearmblog.com/ Phil W “Senior Writer TFB”

      They certainly don’t make cheap or ill conceived guns.

      • DiverEngrSL17K

        Well said, Phil, as usual!

  • Matt Ware

    No pictures of the precision models?

  • verymiddleeuropean

    De gustibus, etc. but this thing looks fugly and phoney at the same time. It is suppose to imitate SCARy assault rifle, but is like caricature of one, with this scaled down upper and thin barrel. Tactical does not have to equal tasteless.
    I have nothing against 22 tacticals, but this…, especially bright alloy model, its just burning my eyes.

  • Rick

    damn I paid less than this to build my tackdriver AR based 22 build. And two pins later it’ll chamber almost everything else.

    this has city/county/podunk Sherriff LEO with a federal grant to waste written all over it.

  • David Sharpe

    What’s the benefit of this over the ISSC MK22?

    • Tyler Bock

      It is not built out of lego pieces. Now its not cheap, but I have only heard bad things about the issc gun.

      • David Sharpe

        Actually I have heard good things about the ISSC, maybe if you don’t run it hard it is fine.

        • Tyler Bock

          Im sure its a fine plinker. I think the issues were mostly ergos and “delicate” parts. But then again, there is no real reason to expect a .22 to be military grade. I have a sig 522 and it is an excellent gun.

  • Blake

    Looks like a nice gun, but for the price I’ll get two CZ512s that are just as nice…

    • DiverEngrSL17K

      Blake, you and I know quite well that there is little out there in that particular caliber that can equate with a CZ512 ( everything else being equal ) in terms of sheer quality.

      • Blake

        & unlike this Anschutz tacti22, CZ 22LR mags are readily available (but I’ll grant that having more than a 10-rounder would be nice). Still, they’re small, light, & easy to handle so carrying 3 or 4 10-rounders is no big deal.

        You can get similar precision with a built 10/22 (Green Mountain bbl, Volquartsen trigger parts & bolt buffer, etc), but CZ gives it to you out of the box & the end result is less expensive.

        Anyway for $900 one could get a CZ512 AND enjoy building a tack-driving 10/22, so Anschutz better be targeting the tacticool folks that really “need” 4 Picatinny rails on a 22LR or they won’t sell a whole lot of them… If one really wanted it tacticool style then Tapco has plenty of 10/22 stocks to accomidate.

        • DiverEngrSL17K

          Precisely so, and well said.

  • George H Hill

    I fired this at Media Range Day at SHOT. It shot well… when it ran.

  • Hunter57dor

    neat. except i can probably build a more accurate auto for half that.

  • Ryan

    I wish my M&P15-22 wasn’t so boringly accurate and reliable so I could justify spending double on something like this…

    • DiverEngrSL17K

      I have an M & P 15-22 myself, and I’ll definitely vouch for your comments. Outstanding .22LR guns at a very reasonable price point considering what you’re getting, by any standards.