Gum Creek Customs Vehicle Holster & Mount Review

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NOTE: This product review was made possible by GunsForSale.com.  To get up-to-date information on where to find Gum Creek holsters for sale, please visit GunsForSale.com.

A fellow officer told me about a great holster system for use in your personal vehicle or patrol vehicle. This vehicle mount and holster is made by Gum Creek Customs.

In fact this combination is in use by the US Marshal Service as well as the U.S. Border Patrol. These agencies aren’t the only users. A fairly good number of local agencies have them in use as well. I have one mounted in my SUV with a Springfield XD while my wife has one in her KIA with a Lady Smith “J” frame.

These days with car jacking fairly common a product like this is a good place to carry a backup gun when driving or traveling. Drawing from this rig is faster than trying to get a gun from a belt holster, which may be under a jacket and or seatbelt. Another thought is using it when you take long trips. It’s more comfortable than carrying your gun in a waist holster.

In a patrol car for instance you always have people walking up to you to ask questions or whatever. With this holster an officer or civilian for that matter can have a hand on the mounted gun without the person outside the car ever knowing it.

The mount is made with a strip of heavy nylon with a steel hook on both ends. Depending on the vehicle these hooks secure the mount to the bottom of the steering column or the panel just below the column. The mount comes with two lengths of nylon with Velcro to secure the chosen holster to the vertical strap. Gum Creek also sells various holster sizes or the user can provide a holster of their choosing. A clip holster or any made for use with a belt will work fine. One thing to keep in mind is for a right hand draw a left-handed holster must be used and vice versa for a left hand draw. Installation takes just a few minutes. When you have everything setup the holster and mount is very secure and will not come loose even with a vigorous draw.

The mount and holsters may also be purchased at Brownells, Brownells Police Store as well as the NRA store. Retail with a nylon holster is $49.95. Check the Gum Creek website for local dealers in your area.

If you are traveling and your state doesn’t have CCW reciprocity with the states you travel through you could have problems. It’s always a good idea to check ahead of time to avoid a pretty serious problem.

Holster Sizing:

Size 06
- Beretta PX4 Storm Sub-Compact
- Kahr CW, CM, PM
- Para PDA, Carry
- Ruger LC9
- S&W 642, 442, 438, 340, 638, 637 Airweight J-frames
- Springfield EMP
- Walther PPS

Size 12
- Bersa Thunder, Thunder CC, Thunder Plus, Firestorm
- Kel-Tec PF9, P-11
- Sig Sauer P232
- Walther PK380, PPK
- Colt Mustang
- Kahr P380
- Kel-Tec P-3AT
- Kimber Solo
- Ruger LCP
- S&W Bodyguard (auto)
- Sig Sauer P238, P290
- Taurus TCP

Size 22
- Beretta PX4 full-size
- FNH-USA FNP full-size
- HK 45 and USP full-size
- Hi-Point

Size 24
- Fits full size automatics with rail mounted lasers or flashlights

Size 26
- Beretta PX4 Storm Compact
- CZ 75 Compact
- FNH-USA FNX
- HK 45 Compact, USP Compact, P30, P2000
- S&W Sigma, SD
- Sig Sauer P220, P226, P229, P239, P250
- Taurus 24/7 Compact
- Walther PPQ

Size 28 – (Best Seller. This holster has replaced the old Size 14)

- Beretta 92fs
- Bersa Thunder Pro
- Glock – all models
- HK P2000
- Para PDA, Warthog, Hawg, Carry, Companion, LTC Tactical
- Ruger SR9/SR40, SR9c models, P345, P94 & P95
- S&W Bodyguard (revolver), M&P, Sigma, SD
- Springfield XD / XDM
- Taurus 111, 132, 138, 140, 145, 709, Slim
- 1911′s 5″ and under

* This holster universally fits most full-size and compact 9mm to .45 auto’s, similar to the models above.

Size 08R
- For revolvers up to 3″ barrel

Related

Phil White

Retired police officer with 30 years of service. Firearms instructor and SRU team member. I still instruct with local agencies. My daily carry pistol is the tried and true 1911. I’m the senior writer and moderator at TFB as well as the review manager. I really enjoy answering readers questions and comments. We can all learn from each other about our favorite hobby!



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  • Mr. Fahrenheit

    Looks cool on the photo above.

    Unfortunately, on the two sedans I own it looks like the strap placement would place the holster too far away to allow for a quick draw. My inner elbow would hit the steering wheel on a draw.

    • Phil White

      Mr.,

      I think a lot depends on how close you sit to the steering wheel, arm length etc. It’s actually easier to draw than it may appear.

      • Bill

        Has anyone tried this with a Chrysler Aspen?

  • Boner Stallone

    Oh snap a model for high point!
    Compared to standard Mexican carry, from that position it will be much easier to throw out the window when running from the cops.

    • Phil White

      Boner,

      Yea, well I was surprised at home many came to the defense of the High Points when I said something bad about them:-)

    • Leo

      As soon as you saw Hi Point listed there (I own two Hi Points! Love ‘em.) You just knew that some comedic savant would chime in all “hyuck hyuck”-like. Well, at least there are a few things in this tumultuous life that are as constant and as the rotation of the old Earth itself … Hey, Keep on hatin’ oh ye affordable-pistol-mocking internet clown! You are a veritable “Rock of Gibraltar” around here.

      • Phil White

        Leo,

        Told ya Boner Stallone:-) Hey I never criticize what someone carries. It’s one of the most personal choices a person can make.

      • Boner Stallone

        Aw i knew id get in trouble for that one :)
        Nothing against you or your High Points, I rather enjoy the carbine, its just that most of the folks i have met that regularly carry high point pistols do not do so legally, and tend to hold them sideways.
        As the old saying goes, stereo types exist for a reason. Nahmeen?

      • Leo

        I see your point there, Sir B.S. … Indeed, those of us peace-seeking, harm-others-not Hi-Point fans often share some rather ill-reputed ‘banging’ company, which in turn has the ill-effect of marring our own decent reputations. But, I do contest that the same could be said for other makes and their owners, like those arms made by Glock, Beretta and Ruger, to name just a few. Maybe a smaller ratio of those are used in crimes, I don’t know, but I doubt that the total numbers are fewer.

        Mr. White, you are quite right, that it is very personal to me, my choice as to what I wield as a defensive weapon, yes, it is no less personal to me than what I choose to eat to sustain myself! But, we need not be overly thin skinned, you know, I work on that all the time. I just hope we gun lovers can stick together a little better ( We need to! Desperately! Don’t you all see?) For, it shouldn’t matter what we shoot really, as long as we take pride, aim to be safe, and do all that we do with a passion!

        • Phil White

          Leo,

          One thing I hate to see on some forums is those who prefer one brand and attack those who prefer a different type or brand. We all have reasons for our choices and I suppose when you get down to it one person is no more right than another if you look at it as a personal choice.
          I’m not making reference to those who frequent The Firearm Blog. I don’t want to point out which forums I’m referring to but I’m sure most of you have an idea which ones I’m talking about:-)

      • Leo

        10-4, I think I know what you mean. I lurk on many forums.
        All who might be interested, come join us on the Hi Point Firearms Forum! I am a newbie still there myself, but, what is great is that there folks really don’t tolerate snobbery too much at all, partly by default I suppose, from what I can see anyway! Best success to all Constitution supporting brothers out there who believe in the human right that is self defence and determination … Cheers Leo

        • Phil White

          Leo,

          There are others here that use Hi Points so there may be some takers on that forum—–enjoy it!

  • Bob Z Moose

    Am I the only one that would prefer a cross-draw or maybe a console holster. I could only imagine getting the pistol hitting the wheel as I draw. Otherwise, a very cool and practical idea.

    • Phil White

      Bob,

      I’ve come so close to getting a cross draw and just never did. I just keep one in this holster and the other under all those winter clothes on my belt:-)

      • Bob Z Moose

        Phil,

        Thanks for responding. I usually don’t get constructive replies on this blog. :P

        The system seems like a really good idea, but does it take some getting use to when drawing? Is hitting the wheel a problem for people that aren’t familiar with the holster system?

        The cross-draw idea just seems to fit with car or seated draw. It seems like it would be a fast system to present the pistol to a threat from the right when seated (such as would be the case in a car jacking type situation). Otherwise, I’m really interested in this system.

        • Phil White

          Bob,

          Sure, I try to think before I respond and be as constructive as possible. As a new system for anyone it takes a bit of practice just like you would accustom yourself to a new gun on the range (just leave the bullets at home–) It’s not a difficult task to learn and is fast to get into play. Now everyone has a different build, arm length, vehicle type which all comes into play. As a general statement I don’t believe most people would have any problems using this rig proficiently with an hour or so of practice followed by some occasional refresher time in the beginning.

          Most suspects will approach from the drivers side. Of course there are times when someone may come from the passenger side. Something else to consider is the passenger in your car. If they see someone armed coming up fast they could conceivably reach across draw left handed and be effective.That may not seem reasonable to some but I practice a lot shooting left or weak handed. If you dedicate time to weak handed shooting it gets a lot easier.

          I have used a cross draw holster when working our Street Crime Unit. We spent a lot of time in the car on various details so a cross draw is fast and practical for vehicle use. I didn’t wear heavy clothing or seat belt like I would now which is why I like this system.

          The down side with a cross draw is when you get out of the car. It’s fairly easy for someone to snatch the gun away from you.

  • fw226

    How concealed is this from view (from outside the car) with the door closed? Open?

    I guess I don’t have to have it concealed, I guess, but a CHL holder would want to consider that.

    • Phil White

      fw226,

      From a person outside they would have a tough time seeing it. If you dive a small car like a KIA my wife drives it’s under the steering column so it’s pretty much out of sight. With my SUV if your left leg is over by the column it’s also hard to see. Now it the door is open you can see it fairly easy if your looking in that part of the vehicle.

      • fw226

        Sweet! Well, I’m sold. I make enough drives where I don’t want a gun unreachable and annoying on my hip that this sounds great. If we had assigned patrol units, I’d be tempted to keep my 26 stored there as well.

        • Phil White

          fw226,

          It would be nice if you could keep it mounted in the car all the time. If all the cars are the same for the most part it probably wouldn’t be hard to move it from one car to the other in a couple of minutes.

  • Lance

    Like that idea for a spare while at work nice idea.

    • Phil White

      Lance,

      Yes sir that’s why the Border Patrol, PD’s at least ok them for use if they don’t buy them through the agency. The friend of mine who first told me about them lives in San Diego where a pretty large number of officers use them in their own vehicles as well.

  • jacob

    Sorry when I hit the statement “car jacking fairly common”… A rather significant exaggeration unless you live in Tijuana or Oakland.

    • Phil White

      jacob,

      Actually the city I mentioned earlier of Columbia, Mo, has had a real spike in crime lately from car jacking to home invasions. Of course eventually that will slow down but right now it’s a concern. It’s a college town of about 120,000 without the Mizzou student population. Other cities I can comment on are Memphis, Tn, and Little Rock, Ar. It’s not uncommon in these cities either.
      In fact my old Street Crime Unit worked those for some time because it was getting out of hand. It’s been primarily a gang thing.

      • Jeff Smith

        Phil,

        I am from Memphis and I can verify that. Carjackings are a fairly common occurrence here.

        • Phil White

          Jeff,

          Outside of a home invasion a car jacking is about the scariest thing a person can have happen to them! I went to an in service class over there and learned Memphis is even worse than Little Rock which is saying something. During the initial brief they warned us about current crimes and that was one of them. They actually gave us maps of areas to stay away from!

      • Jeff Smith

        Phil,

        As a construction worker, I usually work in those same areas!

        • Phil White

          Jeff,

          Safety in numbers on those jobs. I bet some have a gun around not very far away:-)

      • Haezeus

        Jeff, I’m from Memphis, too. Not just that, I live near campus and work downtown. This is the exact reason I got one.

        • Phil White

          Haezeus,

          Downtown around the Med is not a good place to be. I can remember several homicides in the parking decks there.As long as you’re way downtown by the courthouses you’re ok but the Beal street area no thanks! The area north of the justice center isn’t to great either!

      • jacob

        I understood the intention but objected to the classification of something rare as common. While a carjacking is more dangerous than a typical crime, it is significantly less common in frequency.

        I was not judging the need to carry. I’m generally sarcastic and was not being intentionally offensive.

        • Phil White

          jacob,

          Not a problem–I guess we’ll just have to respect each others difference of opinion. I wasn’t offended by any means and I appreciate your explaination.

  • Nathaniel

    Looks like it would cause trouble if you got pulled over.

    • Phil White

      Nathaniel,

      It shouldn’t if you follow the recommendations of concealed carry and advise the officer you’re armed right off the bat.Both hands on top of the steering wheel etc. You still should have a concealed carry permit even if your state allows open carry in a vehicle.
      That doesn’t mean some gung ho rookie won’t freak but in general it should be no problem.

      • Nathaniel

        You would be quite lucky if the situation actually worked out that way.

        • Phil White

          Nathaniel,

          You mean getting pulled over? Seriously most officers use good judgement and keep up with the laws so there would be no problem in 99.9 % of the stops. There are always exceptions in any group of people so I can’t say you would never ever have a problem. It’s a situation where you weigh the pros and cons and decide what’s best for you in the area you live in.

  • Haezeus

    I’ve actually been using this for a few weeks. It works flawlessly. Once I got the strap seated correctly and tightened down securely, my carry weapon, a Sig Sauer Traditional 1911 Compact, hasn’t made it slip an inch. It should be pretty easy to draw in most sedans, and you can’t see it from outside the car with the door closed, unless you bend awkwardly to peer through the window.

    I got stopped the other day, and, when I informed the officer that I was carrying, he asked me where I had the gun. I told him it was under the steering wheel. He crouched to look past my leg and immediately said, “Wow, that’s pretty cool. I didn’t know they made something like that.” I got off with a warning.

    • Phil White

      Haezeus,

      There ya go that’s how it should work.

  • Mark

    As someone who usually carries a pistol in the small of my back I’d say that this is a good alternate holster position for driving. Seems like it would reduce the in-seat gymnastics required to maintain a ‘concealed’ weapon when travelling by car, as I could transfer to and from this rig while partially seated but with the car door open. Currently I transfer to/from a compartment in the door, which can be awkward.

    • Phil White

      Mark,

      It really is fast Mark. That’s why I got mine simply because it’s so cumbersome and slow to draw this time of year with a seatbelt and heavy clothing on.

  • Will

    The only problem with that thing is that my retarded ass has a hard time getting my leg past the steering wheel as it is XD

    • Phil White

      Will,

      Well they aren’t for everyone and I sure wouldn’t be pretentious enough to think so! For a lot of folks though it’s a good alternative.

  • John Doe

    And we will now watch carjacking fall into decline. Until some idiot’s leg is too fat and he accidentally shoots himself while pulling out the gun.

    • Phil White

      John,

      Even with a rig like this you have to practice and identify any problems you may have getting to it or drawing and presentation. I draw to the right cross over between the steering wheel and my torso barrel up then lower the barrel as it gets close to pointing at the threat. No problem as long as you follow basic safety and keep that finger off the trigger until it’s at least pointing out the window or close to it.

      • John Doe

        Of course, I was just making a joke. Although I could see this as a problem for people with bigger thighs where clearance from the steering column is already an issue.

        • Phil White

          John,

          Lol–well there are way to many folks out there with that problem. They would have a real problem using one of these!

    • 276pedersen

      Like that guy that shot himself in the leg with the Taurus Judge that was on here not too long ago.

  • Aurelien

    That’s the magnum way to carry your gun when driving (remember, he had a holster attached under the wheel in the 308).

    If you’re not too squimish about drilling the dash, theres the way G-Code does it : http://www.gunnersalley.com/product/GCODERTI/G-CODE-GXS-Series-with-RTI-System.html
    That picture has been online for a few years now.

    Anyhow, i’m not a big fan of cordura holsters with retention in that cas. I think a rigid one with passive lock would be a better solution.

    • Phil White

      Aurelien,

      You aren’t locked into a holster from these guys you can actually use a Safariland with the index finger lock. Really any holster made for belt carry will work. I do business with Gunners Alley so I’m familiar with this setup. I just don’t want to drill holes in my console:-(

  • West

    This looks like it would be visible to any cop taking a casual look which can get you locked up in my state. Ive practiced drawing from under the seat of my truck enough to be comfortable.

    • Bryan S.

      What state would that be, and can you cite the law that it falls under?

      • West

        Texas law regarding weapons carried in a vehicle states that the weapon must be totally concealed to an officer stand outside of the vehicle. It just so happens that I have the same truck used in the photo and im quite sure this rig could be seen by a cop standing at my window.

        • Phil White

          West,

          In your state it would be iffy to use one of these then.

      • JM

        West – you’re wrong. In Texas you can have a firearm in the open in a car that you own and have operational control of.

        As soon as you leave the vehicle, you must lock the doors and conceal the firearm.

        • Phil White

          JM,

          I thought they had open vehicle carry. I mean it is Texas-)

      • fw226

        JM: No! No you cannot! You can have a rifle or shotgun in view in a car you have control of, but a handgun you cannot.

        Texas UCW law states you commit an offense if “the handgun is in plain view” or you are committing an offense other than a class C traffic violation, or if you are a gang member. Incidentally, CHL laws don’t apply to this.

        If I had to really strain to see this from outside the car, and the driver had no other problems (DWI, drugs, etc), I probably wouldn’t worry about it, but if it’s visible from outside, you’re running a risk in Texas.

      • West

        JM – Nope, not according to the HPD officer who was the instructor for my CHL class and all of the literature ive seen. Weapon must be TOTALLY concealed at all times.

      • JM

        As of 2007 your vehicle is treated as an extension of your home in Texas. As long as you are in control of the vehicle and the firearm isn’t handled in a “brandishing” manner then it does not have to be completely concealed.

      • fw226

        JM, that applies to using the firearm for defense. UCW still applies, we still enforce it, the DA still prosecutes, and the judges are fine with it.

        To anyone else in Texas, I would suggest you tale a close look at PC 46.02 before trying to open carry a handgun.

      • fw226

        (Regarding the link) Exactly. The nonapplicability for ‘traveling’ has effectively made it legal to carry concealed in the car, though you could still be in the unfortunate position of having to describe whether driving to the store counts as traveling. Courts have not, however, taken that to allow open carry while traveling – you can argue that in appellate court, after the hassle of being jailed.

      • Mr. Fahrenheit

        Texas

        PC §46.02. UNLAWFUL CARRYING WEAPONS.
        (a-1) A person commits an offense if the person intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly carries on or about his or her person a handgun in a motor vehicle or watercraft that is owned by the person or under the person’s control at any time in which:
        (1) the handgun is in plain view; or
        (2) the person is:
        (A) engaged in criminal activity, other than a Class C misdemeanor that is a violation of a law or ordinance regulating traffic or boating;
        (B) prohibited by law from possessing a firearm; or
        (C) a member of a criminal street gang, as defined by Section

        • Phil White

          Mr.,

          Thanks for posting that——

      • JM

        Anything below the windowline is out of plain view. That will hold up in court with a decent lawyer.

        Assuming, of course, that you’re even arrested. Which any self-respecting peace officer would not do for simply having a firearm sitting in the console or strapped under the steering column.

        The operational word is “reckless”.

        • Phil White

          JM,

          Agreed no officer worth his salt would take issue with this setup.

    • Phil White

      West,

      It’s really whatever your comfortable with. As a retired officer I don’t think I would immediately notice this setup. I’m watching hands and facial expressions at first which gives the driver time to advise me he’s carrying. I also stood at the vertical window column behind the driver.

      • West

        Nothing against cops but im not comfortable on an officers discretion to keep me from taking a ride in a patrol car.
        Personally, I think its a pretty cool set up and I would get one if I was totally convinced it could stay hidden.

        • Phil White

          West,

          I’ll admit that officers vary as much as the general population. Most are reasonable and know the law. You can always run into a cowboy though.

  • West

    Funny, I just realized the pic is of a 2005 Taco, just like mine.

    • Phil White

      West,

      LOL—well you know how it would look and attach then:-)

    • Red

      Actually, it’s an 01-04 Tacoma. Should still work on an o5+ though. ;)

  • Bryan S.

    Interesting idea. Not for me, but interesting idea none the less. all of my vehicles and my anatomy would clash with a pistol mounted on the steering column.

    Specifically the motorcycles.

    ;)

    • Phil White

      Bryan,

      You know I don’t recall who makes them but I did see a holster that mounted specifically for a motorcycle. That is if your state has open carry.

  • Erik

    I’ve had my eye on this product for a while, thanks for reviewing it!

    • Phil White

      Erik,

      You’re very welcome! I’m glad it helped you out.

  • lou

    …and this is legal where?

    • Phil White

      lou,

      You just have to check with the local states attorney where you live. They can let you know if you are an open carry state or if you need a CCW permit. The only state I know it would not be legal is Illinois.

      • Andrew

        Also, not legal in Texas.

        • Phil White

          Andrew,

          I’m not sure Andrew. It’s still a bit up in the air for me. I’m going to call the attorney general in Texas and get a definitive answer tomorrow.

    • robert

      I would not think it OK for Texas as you have to have the weapon concealed at all times from reasonable observation. Covering it with a rag might do. For a concealed weapon to be concealed, it needs should not be visible from looking though the windows. Curious if you got a reply from Tex AG.

      This is a great idea as the thigh approach is very poor and many cars don’t have an appropriate gap between the seats. I used to use an old belt and lace a nylon holster under the front seat. That works great in a Crown Vic (old model). Electric seats defeat this as well as many newer cars without much room.

      • Phil White

        robert,

        I did finally get an answer yesterday afternoon. I’m afraid it wasn’t much help though. I called the attorney generals office and got a yes that’s ok since it’s probably not visible to normal/casual observation. Possibly more importantly the Texas DPS said it woud be iffy unless you —– guess what—-draped a small towel or something similar over it depending on how visible it was in a particular vehicle.The DPS Lt. I spoke with didn’t come up with the dish towel idea. I actually was thinking along the same lines as you and asked about that option to conceal it yet make it easily drawn from the holster. Of course he did say it’s always a good idea to tell an officer/trooper whatever you have a weapon in the vehicle.

        I know my wife’s KIA has zero room under the front seat because of the electric seats.

  • Matt

    When you said it went in USMS vehicles, about half of the fanboi readership got chubbies; I suspect this will end up mounted inside a lot more Kias and auctioned Crown Vics than government Tahoes. Sort of like all the Eotechs and Aimpoints sold to AR owners who will never face any more danger with their weapons in their hands than a piece of brass inside their eyepro.

    Not saying it isn’t a good idea for the few with a real need, but tucking a backup under your thigh seems a cheaper and as effective option.

    Matt
    St paul

    • ParatrooperJJ

      Try doing manuevers at speed with a firearm under your thigh. Hint – it doesn’t stay there….

    • Phil White

      Matt,

      I don’t know about tucking a gun under your leg. I had a partner who did that at times and it usually ended up on the floorboard. He finally stopped doing it when I went off on him after having to bail out of the car and chase a suspect alone because he was fishing for his gun! I was not happy.

      • Matt

        Fair enough guys, I’ll concede to your operational experience. I also remember how an agent in the FBI Miami shootout did this, and lost his Smith nine for the duration of the shootout, being left with his BUG.

        How about tucked between the seat and console. Or, if you’re wearing an external vest carrier, on there somewhere. Basically, anywhere out of the way of your seat belt.

        Unfortunately situational awareness is a much better weapon than a hideout Glock. We had a patrol sergeant killed here last year by a failed carjacker; the jacker walked up on him quickly from a wooded path and shot him in the face before he could get his seat belt undone. Sad and tragic. An officer for another department put the shooter down later in the day, but not before the killer broke both his eye sockets and nose with a bag of lug nuts.

        • Phil White

          Matt,

          Yea we studied that Miami shootout a lot and I do remember that happening. Of course that’s what started the quest for the 10MM by the FBI. If you put it between the seat and console and it’s tight enough I guess that would work.The only problem with it is all the junk we have in the cars these days. With the in car computer, gun rack etc there isn’t much room left especially in these new rather small Chevrolets. I wouldn’t leave it visible if I got out of the car.
          We had problems with suspects breaking into our units while we were inside a residence on a disturbance call or whatever. Sometimes I think the chasing a suspect was a ploy to get us away from the car. Our shotguns were locked in but they still tried. Some guys laid them by the door and seat and we did loose one shotgun that way. After that it was put it in the rack or don’t check one out!
          I also had a routine that applied to people coming up to my car. I took my gun out and with my right hand had the gun just under view below the window. All I had to do was raise it and fire. Situational awareness is key to everything else!

      • Matt

        I read a book once (I know, I know) about the 14th Intelligence Co that operated in Northern Ireland doing deep cover surveillance for the SAS hitters.

        When they would drive from spot to spot, they’d have to be aware of IRA ‘checkpoints’ meant to catch off duty Brits or UC teams. The Det officers were issued a personal weapon and kept a car gun, typically a Browning HP or SIG 226 with a 20 round magazine. If stopped, they would do as you did, except they just shot through the door to break the ambush.

        • Phil White

          Matt,

          Yes with the right ammo you can shoot through a door especially up higher where the bar inside doesn’t interfere.

      • John Doe

        @Matt

        Thought about that. If you’re being carjacked, while you take out the keys, withdraw your magnum and put a .44 through the door and into his nuts.

        • Phil White

          John,

          Ouch now that would go through a door and much more–LOL!

  • laffo

    This simply could not work if you drive a small car. I drive a Civic (I’m 6 feet even) and I barely have enough knee room in there as it is. I don’t see this as being practical for the average civilian.

    • JM

      I think you’re assuming too much about the “average” civilian.

      Besides: MAKE room. You have an adjustable seat and tilt steering for a reason.

      • Phil White

        JM,

        A lot of cars also have adjustable foot pedals as well——

      • JM

        Exactly. Like my wife’s.

  • Matt G.

    While I like the idea, that placement on my truck would be extremely visible to the people at burger king or the bank drive-thru. Sounds like a possible recipe for misunderstanding.

    • Phil White

      Matt,

      I guess you could put the pistol in the console until you get out of the drive through?

  • http://seriousgunblog.com SGB

    …and do they make one for a shotgun? :)

    • Phil White

      SGB,

      Uh no:-)

  • JMD

    Does anyone else find it odd that Glocks aren’t on that list anywhere? Even Hi-Points are on the list, but not Glocks.

    • JMD

      Oops, nevermind. Size 28…

      *facepalm*

      • Phil White

        JMD,

        Ah well easy to miss with so many guns listed.

  • Tony

    I’d have thought if you were going to have the holster that open you might as well mount it to the centre console.

    • Phil White

      Tony,

      Not for me–I would hate to drill any holes in the console.

  • Charlie

    This would require a CCW permit in two of the states I frequent: GA & TN. In GA you can conceal in the glove compartment or console. In TN you can’t have a loaded gun period, w/o a permit. This would be good for my HiPoints because they’re hard to fit in my glove compartment :)

    • Phil White

      Charlie,

      Yea they are definitely not small guns! Does GA and TN have reciprocity with each other as far as CCW permits?

  • http://www.bravoplatoon.com Rafael

    This is a great idea. Here in Puerto Rico the streets are getting harder every day so this is a little peace of mind. Very nice.

    • Phil White

      Rafael,

      I’ve read that it is getting worse there so yes I agree this would be very good for the area.

  • Charlie

    Paul: here is a link regarding Georgia’s reciprocity with other states>
    http://www.georgiapacking.org/gflr.php

    • Phil White

      Charlie,

      You would be pretty well covered from what I see on that map. At least most states I’d be interested in visiting:-)

  • Jim

    Wow. Been wanting something like this for ages. Thanks for posting. I live in Georgia, so this is good to go for us boys in the Southeast. I went to buy one though and they are sold out. Oh well, I added myself to their pre-order list. I can wait another couple of weeks. Great review.

    • Phil White

      Jim,

      Great Jim I’m glad this review helped you out. That’s what I like to hear:-) Thanks—–

  • Krag

    This is the most polite forum thread I have ever read in my life. Even the jokers are polite. Makes me feel okay with being an individual of our species, as least for a moment. Thank you all for your informative comments.

  • 1119

    I bought this product and it would not synch up tight enough to be useful. Was very disappointed.

  • Rup9mm

    Is this concidered concealed and legal in Texas?

  • Jack

    I am not sure what size holster would fit my S&W M&P 9mm Shield, can you help?

  • Joel

    for anyone who wants to find out what size holster they will need. Go to the gun manufacturer’s website and look up your gun, all you need to do is find the barrel length on your firearm, and compare that to the list of the holster sizes they have on gumcreek.com

  • Fatachino

    The real exciting thing about Gum Creek Customs, is MADE IN AMERICA! BY AMERICANS!
    You can see the product is very well built and if you check the web site they back what they sell. Now they even added a new product for the concealed carrier. It is a fantastic holder with a flap and easy access to get the gun out quick. plus a Mag holder. I can not wait to get mine. Bravo Gum Creek!