Stag Arms SBR Uppers soon to be available to general public

GunPundit reports

Straight from the Stag Arms vault, and once reserved exclusively for Law Enforcement, Military, and Special Forces – the highly anticipated SBR uppers will now be available to the general public in a wide range of configurations to best suit consumer needs. All SBR uppers boast a 5.56 NATO chamber, 1/7 twist rifling, M4 feed ramps, and a MP tested and marked bolt and will ship complete with bolt carrier assembly and charging handle.

Model SBR-T with 11.5″ Barrel – $795


Steve Johnson

Founder and Dictator-In-Chief of TFB. A passionate gun owner, a shooting enthusiast and totally tacti-uncool. Favorite first date location: any gun range. Steve can be contacted here.


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  • I’ve never quite understood the fascination with the SBR. But I hope Stag does well and sells a ton of them; there are a lot of folks out there who want them.

  • B

    Aren’t the ATF Form 4 tax stamps still needed for these if it’s legal in your state? Or has some new loophole/repealed law gone into effect that I don’t know about?

  • M, Norway.

    Is this DI or Piston?

  • jdun1911

    The Samson rail probably what drove the price up for the upper.

    I built my 10.5 upper below $350 (without iron sight and BCG, with magpul BUS and BCG below $500). My rail is Midwest Industries 10″ SS FF handguard. It’s the lightest or near the lightest rail in the market. However I think the rails are out of spec. I need a rubber mullet to hammer my front MBUS on it.

    Every parts I got was at or near cost.

    http://www.midwestindustriesinc.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=category.display&category_id=269

  • Alex

    I’ve seen some guys at the range with SBR uppers. Their guns had the stocks removed, leaving just a buffer tube.

    They told me this qualified the gun as a pistol, making the short-barrel legal. Murky water if you ask me, and the only reason to tread there as a civilian is to look cool, in my opinion.

  • jdun1911

    M, Norway,

    DI.

    B,

    You need a $200 NFA tax stamp. NO loop holes. However it is easy to get with a Trust if your chief LEO won’t sign off on it. Long wait to get approve tho. 4-6 month average and that what really really pissed me off the most. Take me 5 minutes to get 5 AR15 receivers approved but somehow the NFA is different.

    How hard is it to enter my name and SS into the computer and pull out all the information you need. How hard is it to print it out and put a one cent stamp on it? Apparently it takes them 4 to 6 months to do it if you’re lucky. Some have to wait over 1 year.

    If you’re interest of getting NFA tax stamp let me know. It takes 15 minutes to do a Trust and about 10 minutes to fill out the NFA forums.

  • Edward

    Re: exposed buffer tube — legal opinions aside, at that point I consider it more of an AR-15 pistol than a “proper” SBR.

    As for the “why” of the things? For some it may be coolness factor, but while my only experience with them has been to hold a Navy EOD Mk 18, personally I’m sympathetic to the sensation that SBRs are less “unwieldy” than carbines or full-length rifles, especially for a shorter (personal) body build and shorter limbs, even at the expense of terminal ballistic performance.

  • jdun1911

    Alex,

    They are correct as long as it is registered as a pistol.

    http://www.ar15.com/forums/forum.html?b=3&f=122

  • John C.

    I don’t see why you would need a NFA stamp for this. I have seen multiple other AR-15 uppers with short barrels that can be ordered from the internet or bought in stores. As long as you put it on a pistol lower, you are legal. (As far as I know)

  • Cymond

    Just a note, the tax stamp is for the lower. Uppers are unrestricted and you can have as many SBR uppers as you want as long as you have a SBR lower. However, you can be prosecuted for intent if you own an upper and a non-tax-stamp lower.

    jdun1911, my wedding is in 9 days so I’d like some info on setting up my own trust. I know trusts are simple, but I read somewhere that NFA trusts have a few extra things to consider. I don’t remember any of the details, though.

  • jdun1911

    Trust are very simple to do. You can do it two ways. Lawyer up or buy Quicken Willmaker or similar programs. I use Quicken and it only took me 15 minutes to complete. Overall first time it will take around 30 minutes or so to complete your trust and NFA forms.

    1. Launch Quicken
    2. Select Living Trust – Basic Trust
    3. Follow the direction. Make sure the firearm(s) you enter have the serial number and describe it as much as possible (model, make, etc).
    4. Once finished notarize it. Local banks around here do it for free. You do not need to record it at the city hall. Trust are private. There are some states that give you the option to record the trust but it is not require.
    5. Make two copies.
    6. Send the copies with the NFA forms. Keep the original.

    If you want to make a receiver you already own into NFA fill out Form 1. Form 4 is where you buy it from the dealer. Most common use of form 4 are suppressors.

    Form 1.
    Download
    http://www.atf.gov/forms/download/atf-f-5320-1.pdf

    I’m going to copy and past from Afcom. Save me a lot of time.

    http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=6&f=17&t=257740

    Number 5 and 6 ARE VERY IMPORTANT. The forms must be double sided. In other words when you fill out an ATF form it front and back right? Well it has to be the same thing. You need to send them TWO COPIES of Form 1 and Form 5330.20 (download link at bottom with help) for EACH FIREARM. BTW make sure you don’t forget to write the check. It’s very important to them because they cash it IMMEDIATELY. God forbid the ATF workers starve to death.

    Wait for 4-6 months if you’re lucky. Once it has been approved, engrave your lower with your trust name and location, i.e
    JDUN TRUST Virgina Beach, VA. USA

    If you got denied (probably you fill the form wrong), you’ll get your money back. Try again.

    a. Item 1, check the tax paid box.

    b. Item 2, if registering the item via a trust or a corporation, check the “Corporation or Other Business Entity” box. Otherwise, you’re most likely an individual.

    c. I left 3a blank (this box would be used for a corporation).
    In box 3b, put your name and address, or the name of your trust and the address. It should look something like:
    Mickey Mouse Trust
    123 Magic Kingdom Rd.
    Walt Disney World, FL 12345

    3c, 3d, and 3e are self explanatory.

    d. Section 4:

    Box 4a, the name & location as inscribed on the gun of the original manufacturer of the gun, such as Colt, LMT, Bushmaster….whomever. My latest one was: Anvil Arms, Lakeland, FL.

    4b, describe what your making…in this example, it’s a short barreled rifle. I abbreviated and stated “Short Bbl Rifle”.

    4c: Caliber…what is the primary caliber. You must pick something….I put 5.56 mm. In the past, people have been able to put “Multi” or something to that effect, and if you tried it now, you still might get approved. My understanding is the ATF is now requiring you to be more specific. Should you decide to permanently change the caliber at a later time, you may do so by notifying the ATF in writing. You may temporarily alter the caliber provided you can restore it to the original configuration (meaning you can put a 22 conversion on your 5.56 SBR for a cheap range trip), but you should still keep the 5.56 upper.

    4d: I have used AR-15 as the model number and been approved. If you have an LMT, “Defender 2000” might also be acceptable. With the “fillalbe pdf” available on the ATF website, the range is long enough to put something like “Defender 2000; AR-15” To me, this would be the most correct way of completing this box since it does provide the specific model and the general type of rifle.

    4e: State the barrel length in inches. Again, choose your barrel length and complete the form. It can also be temporarily changed provided you can restore the original configuration. Should you desire to permanently change the barrel length, you can notify the ATF in writing of the change.

    4f: State the overall length in inches. Obviously this will depend on barrel length and the type of stock you have. The measurement is made with the collapsible stock fully extended.

    4g: State the serial number of the weapon. You will not have a new serial number if you SBR an existing gun…you simply use what’s already on it. If you are truely manufacturing something, such as a silencer, then you will need to assign a unique serial number. This can be as simple as Mickey Mouse, Model A, Serial Number 1.

    4h: I have always left this one blank, but you can put whatever you had inscribed onto your lower here as an additional description. You may also wish to list other calibers and barrel lengths that you plan on using with the SBR. As an alternative to listing each barrel length and caliber in this box, attaching a letter to the form to notify the ATF of your intentions would also be okay. That said, you are not required to notify the ATF of temporary changes of this nature.

    4i: I stated, “To enhance collection and all lawful purposes.” I have read stories of people putting humorous reasons, such as “To fight off the zombie hordes”, and being approved. Again, I’m not that original nor would I recommend this.

    4j: is likely No.

    Items 5 and 6, I left blank. I’m neither an FFL nor a business owner. If you are obtaining your NFA item as an individual and you have a C&R FFL, I’d probably go ahead and provide my FFL number. Who knows, it may speed up the process? If you’re using the trust route, do not provide your C&R FFL number. To my knowledge, the ATF does not issue FFL’s to trusts, so this would be like having two entities trying to register the NFA item, and it would likely be kicked back.

    Items 7 and 8, sign your complete name in line 7 (I suggest waiting to sign until you make sure the form is accurate, and to wait until after you’ve made some blank copies). If using a trust, print “grantor” after your signature. Type your name in box 8 and again, if using a trust, type “grantor” after your name.

    Item 9, put in the date.

    Items 10 and 11, Check No in each box (but answer honestly).

    4) If you went the trust route, you’re pretty much done with this form. Otherwise you’ll need to complete items 12 and 13. This includes having your picture made (you’ll need two passport type photos) and getting the CLEO signature. The CLEO can be the Chief of Police, Sheriff, DA, etc. While you’re at the police dept, go ahead and get your fingerprints taken. Again, you’ll need two complete sets. My experience is that there are certain days the police like to do fingerprints, so find out what day that is. Also, it’s usually good to at least call ahead and make sure your CLEO will sign the form. If you live in the city limits and the Chief of Police won’t sign the form, you might be able to get the County Sheriff to sign it, or vice/versa.
    That’s pretty much it for completing the Form 1, but you’re not quite done yet.

    5). The ATF requires that double sided paperwork be submitted. There are a couple of ways to do this. The first is to print one page, then when the ink dries, turn the paper over and let your printer print on the other side. You could also do what I did and take the forms to work, put them on the photocopier, and let it copy them and print them front and back. To me, this was the easier option. Also, any copy shop should be able to make double sided copies. Note that all forms should have original signatures, so after you print out your Form 1, make multiple copies, then obtain signatures.

    6) You will also be required to fill out a Certification of Compliance (ATF Form 5330.20), available at the same website provided earlier. Both the Form 1 and the Form 5330.20 will need to be completed in duplicate for each firearm you are submitting paperwork for. If you are using a trust, you will also need to include a certified true copy of the declaration of trust and Schedule A. In the past you could get by with just a “certification of trust” but it’s my understanding that a complete copy of the declaration of trust is now required. Be sure to send a “Certified True Copy” of the trust, which is a notarized COPY. Do NOT send the original trust document since it will not be returned to you. You should keep the original in a safe location, such as gun safe or safe deposit box. My SBR to be was already owned by my trust before I sent in the Form 1 paperwork. If it’s not owned by the trust when you send it in, be certain to show ownership of the item in the trust after you get the ATF approval.

    7) Once you have all of this stuff done, write a check in the amount of $200 payable to the Department of Justice, and attach your form 1’s, form 5330.20’s, fingerprint cards, pictures, and copies of your trust as applicable. The government will also accept Post Office Money Orders, but I prefer to write a check. You can tell when they cash it (be sure to write the SN of the NFA item on the check), which at least lets you know they received your application. I personally have experienced one transfer where the check was cashed, but the form 4 had to be submitted three times due to the ATF losing the application. I typically include a cover letter with my applications, asking that the ATF examiner contact me if they have any questions or need additional information. Be sure to include your phone number(s).

    8) Now mail the required documents to:

    NFA Branch
    Suite 1250
    244 Needy Rd.
    Martinsburg, WV 25405-9431

    I called the ATF on 10/16/09 to confirm this was the correct address for Form 1’s.

    9) Begin waiting….patience is a virtue with NFA items. A three month wait is typical, though it can be faster or take longer. You can call the ATF to check on the status of your application. Before calling, make sure the check you sent has cleared the bank. Your NFA item will not be in the system prior to your check clearing. There is also no need to call every day, it will not speed up the process. Once your check has cleared the bank, I suggest waiting one month, and then call once every couple of weeks to verify that your NFA item is in the system, and to find out the status of the item. There are generally three stages of getting an item approved. The first is the ATF doesn’t have anything in their system, and they won’t till well after your check is cashed. The second stage is “Pending”, which means the item is in the system and has been assigned to an examiner. The final stage is “Approved” which is what you’re waiting for.

    The phone number to the ATF NFA branch is 304-616-4500. When you call, they’ll ask you for the serial number of the item you’re inquiring about, so have it available.

    10) Hurrah!!! You’ve been approved, have the Form 1 and stamp in your possession, and can now assemble your SBR or silencer.

    Download 5330.20
    http://www.atf.gov/forms/download/atf-f-5330-20.pdf

    For help on 5330.20 you can go here.
    http://www.guntrustlawyer.com/certification.html

    Congratulation on the wedding Cymond! Stay safe!

    • jdun1911, thanks for the comment.

  • chris

    These are pistol uppers, not SBR uppers. It’s only an SBR upper if you attach it to a tax-paid SBR lower! Anyone can build a pistol from a stripped lower and slap one of these on, and you don’t need the government’s permission or to pay any tax to do it. Just don’t ever attach a buttstock and the BATF won’t bother you. There are special pistol buffer tubes without the stock rail for just this purpose. Totally kosher. Your mileage may vary depending on your local and state laws. This can even be done in California but it’s a bit more complicated than in the Free States.