CMP Offers Navy 7.62 NATO Garand Rifles For Sale

The Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) has a new batch of 7.62 NATO Garand rifles for sale to qualified purchasers. These rifles came from US Navy stores. Let’s check these unique rifles out.

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Springfield Armory Releases Their M1A 'Tanker' Rifle

Specs:

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CMP to Prohibit Resale of 1911s Purchased From Program

The Civilian Marksmanship Program has been selling surplus arms to the American public for years. In that time, they’ve sold M1903 and M1917 bolt-action rifles, as well as M1 Garand and M1 Carbine long guns.

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POTD: Garand's Only T3E1

Made in October 1929, the working model receiver and trigger guard assembly of John C. Garand’s only T3E1 rifle is on display at Springfield Armory National Historic Site.

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All About Stocks! How the National Match Competitions Aided Rifle Design

During the interwar years, Springfield Armory shrunk drastically. To the extreme point of going from five thousand full-time employees to two hundred. One of the ways that Springfield Armory dealt with this was to commit to producing rifles for the National Matches at Camp Perry, Ohio. At first the Armory was taking production rifles and tightening up a few tolerances. But this later progressed to dedicated National Match rifles with heavy barrels, Lyman rear sights, and a shortened forend. Through the Civilian Marksmanship Program, these could be sold to civilians that were eligible in purchasing them (which still exists to this day). During the course of the National Matches, it was found that a pistol grip style stock lended itself much better to accuracy and controllability during the firing process. Now, Springfield Armory by no means didn’t invent the pistol grip stock, these had been around previously. But the change from the straight stock to the pistol grip stock during the National Matches led to changes in the 1903 design as a whole because the Ordnance Department realized the benefits it could have for soldiers in the field. This resulted in the M1903A1. However, there was the problem of tens of thousands of stock blanks left over from the First World War. They couldn’t be made into the full pistol grip “C” type stock because there wasn’t enough wood in the blank. So the Ordnance Department authorized a variance, allowing a “Scant” stock to be created by the various contractors that made the M1903A3 and M1903A4 rifles during the Second World War.

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[SHOT 2018] Updates from Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP)

At SHOT Show’s 2018 Industry Day at the Range, TFBTV’s Corey Wardrop speaks with Gina, CMP South General Manager.

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The Ruger Mini-14: Let's Get Real

If you want a Mini-14 buy one.

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Kalashnikov vs. Schmeisser: Myths, Legends, and Misconceptions [GUEST POST]

The following is an article that was originally written in Russian by TFB contributor Maxim Popenker, and Andrey Ulanov, and translated to English by Peter Samsonov. With their permission, I have replicated the text here, and edited it, for the enrichment of you, our readers!

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World War II vs. Today: Comparing the Soldier's Load in Two Eras

With the soldier’s load growing beyond the bounds of reason, and the Army set to replace the M4 Carbine in some units with the new Interim Combat Service Rifle, questions have arisen about how the soldier’s burden has changed over time. In the comments section of several of my articles relating to these subjects, readers asked if I could compare the current soldier’s load with the soldier’s load from World War II, to see how they compare. As always, I am happy to oblige.

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Break That Case: A Visceral Illustration of Primary Extraction, with Bloke on the Range

Back in the days of the fighting bolt action rifle, clever small arms designers came up with  a number of minor but ingenious features to make the soldier’s life a little less hard when trying to cycle their rifle’s action by hand as they faced down the enemy. Many of these special features have since made their way into many of the world’s modern hunting rifles, but they were pioneered by designers coming up with new and better weapons of war.

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BREAKING: Civilian Marksmanship Program May Receive 86,000 M1 Garand Rifles from the Philippines

The Civilian Marksmanship Program has received word that the Philippine government could be shipping 86,000 M1 Garand rifles back to the United States for distribution to American civilian shooters. Mark Johnson, Chief Operating Officer of the CMP, commented on the possible upcoming delivery to The Firearm Blog:

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Deconstructing "Assault Rifle": The Quest for Universality in Modern Infantry Warfare

Quick: What’s the definition of “assault rifle”? I’ll give you a moment to think about it.

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What We Learned From Recreating WW II History

Previously on TFB we discussed the Lessons Learned from our WW II Squad Live fire which you can read about here, and watch the original episode here. In this episode of TFB TV we have a round table discussion from the actual participants and several subject matter experts who were present at the live fire as to what they experienced and what they went through. For many of us it was our first time extensively handling these WW II small arms in the manner that they were used, and in trying to recreate some of what those soldiers in 1941-1945 went through on an almost daily basis. We discuss smaller matters such as the safety on the M1s, to larger topics when it comes to fire and maneuver with an entire squad. The reenactors played an essential role here because they gave us some of the context of what soldiers then would have encountered.

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Lessons Learned from Our WW II Squad Live Fire

The overall point of the WW II Live Fire, apart from creating an episode for our Youtube Channel, was to gain information and knowledge about these small arms that were used in World War II in ways that we couldn’t have gathered from shooting them on a square range or individually. Something that I think we really need to focus more on from a researcher or historians outlook is that these weapon systems weren’t developed and used in isolation. Sure, the M1 is a fantastic rifle for CMP matches but in all honesty that was very far from John Garand’s mind when he worked on the design. These weapons were designed to used by units of men, working very closely with each other, to accomplish an objective of overcoming an enemy force. Reenactments accomplish this well, but they don’t simulate the treatment these firearms would have gone through in combat due to the presence of live ammunition and actually trying to hit an enemy target at a distance. Bear in mind that we didn’t stage a reenactment, we staged a recreation, because we were literally trying to recreate history. If you haven’t seen the episode yet, please give it a look and then continue to read the article because it will make much more sense.

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Go Tacticool with Garand Molle Pouches

Back in 2012, we mentioned a small outfit, Olongapo Outfitters, which was offering some unique wares for the day, molle compatible Garand clip pouches. Since then, they’ve done a bit of expansion, building up their retro-focused nylon empire to ensure that they are ready for when California inevitably bans any magazine-fed firearm. Per Olongapo:

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