The Rimfire Report: The Legendary Ruger Standard .22 Pistol

Hello and welcome back to another edition of The Rimfire Report! This ongoing series is all about the rimfire firearm world! Last time we talked about the AMT Automag II .22 Magnum pistol. As I assumed would be the case in the comments, most of you guys love the idea, and the looks of the sizeable silver handgun but absolutely loathed the size of the grip, and the lack of consistent reliability across all models with most types of ammo. However, as with any discontinued handgun, not every example is a negative and at least a handful of you mentioned that the pistol was not only stylish but was entertaining as heck to shoot due to the gigantic fireballs the handgun produced. I think we all share the sentiment that it’d be pretty cool to have a modern, decently functioning replica of the Automag II around. This week we’re going further back to a legend within the rimfire pistol scene. Born out of the “Standard” series released in 1949, the eventual Ruger Mark or MK series of pistols would completely change the rimfire pistol scene forever. Today we’ll check out a very nicely preserved sample of the Ruger Standard model sent over to us by our friends at FirearmLand. FirearmLand has been helping us get a closer look at some of these rare and discontinued historical pieces so be sure to check out their website if you’re interested in collecting or even selling some of your rare firearms!

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The Rimfire Report: The Hilariously Huge AMT Automag II .22 Magnum

Hello and welcome back to another edition of The Rimfire Report! This ongoing series is all about the rimfire firearm world and its many different types of guns, ammo, and history. Last time we talked about the concept of a gas-operated 22LR rifle or pistol. While the concept is a neat exercise in “can we do it” the reality of the situation is that the 22LR cartridge is not meant for nor would it be suitable for anything other than a manual or standard blowback semi-automatic action. This week I want to talk a bit about an obscure pistol I’ve been trying to get my hands on for years – the elusive and massive AMT Automag II .22 Magnum rimfire pistol. Born out of the technological revolution of the 80s, the Automag II is equal parts hand cannon and target pistol. This is one rimfire gun I’d love to see make a comeback and hopefully today I can show you why.

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The Rimfire Report: Why You Don't See Gas-Operated 22LR Guns

Hello and welcome back to another edition of The Rimfire Report! This ongoing series is all about the rimfire firearm world and its many different types of firearms, ammunition, and bits of history. Last week we talked about the fondly remembered Winchester 250 lever action 22LR rifle. A lot of you seemed to indeed have fond memories of the rifle and a few of you even commented that you still owned and shot yours which is something we always love to see (safe queens are boring). I was going over some recent show footage from SHOT 2024 and I came across the Rock River Arms 17HMR Gas Operated Blowback 17HMR Rifle. If you can’t watch the video, the rifle basically uses a hybrid of a bearing-locked breech, with a direct impingement system in order to give the 17HMR cartridge to properly build pressure before cycling. A lot of commenters on that video asked the question “Why can’t you do a gas-operated 22LR gun?” Today we’re going to try and at least partially answer this question. I’m not a firearms engineer, but I’ve learned a few things over the years about this tiny little cartridge that I think you’ll agree make it a poor choice to build a true gas-operated firearm around, which is why you don’t see them often.

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The Rimfire Report: The Fondly Remembered Winchester 250 Lever Action

Hello and welcome back to another edition of The Rimfire Report! This ongoing series is all about the rimfire firearm world and all of the types of guns, ammo, and history you can imagine surrounding it! Last week we talked about the odd and often ill-remembered Intratec TEC-22 pistol. A lot of you shared that your own pistols tended not to work well and even confirmed the reports that the gun would often go full-auto occasionally! I always find it very interesting to hear from you guys when it comes to some of the more unsavory reports about rare or discontinued firearms. This week we’re talking about another firearm that has been discontinued, but one that usually brings back fond memories rather than sour ones. This week we’re talking about the discontinued and fondly remembered Winchester 250 22LR lever action rifle.

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The Rimfire Report: George Kellgren's 22LR Scorpion – The Intratec TEC-22

Hello and welcome back to another edition of The Rimfire Report! This ongoing series is entirely focused on rimfire firearms and their related fields. Last week we had a really nice discussion about two of my favorite rimfire handguns, the Ruger MK IV and the SIG P322. While I correctly guessed that most of you would much prefer the MK IV 22/45, I was actually quite surprised just how many of you like the P322 for what it is and what it does. I had the preconceived notion that a majority of people who have owned them actually don’t like them based on online feedback. However, based on everything you guys said in the comments last week, it seems to me that the P322 is indeed a fun plinker… at least when it works! This week we’re going to talk about a pistol that most of you guys either haven’t even heard of or have scrubbed from your memory entirely due to the litany of problems the poor rimfire pistol had over its brief 10-year lifespan. Today we’ll be talking about the George Kellgren-designed Interatec TEC-22 22LR semi-automatic pistol. While it might look like a boring plastic polymer 22LR pistol, the TEC-22 has a lot of interesting features that make it worth looking over or maybe even owning as a collector’s item.

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The Rimfire Report: Which Way Rimfire Man? Ruger MK IV 22/45 vs. SIG P322

Hello and welcome back to another edition of The Rimfire Report! This ongoing series, as always, is focused entirely on rimfire firearms and discussions around rimfire topics. Recently we took a look at one of SIG’s tricked-out P322 pistols. Most of you who keep close tabs on the blog will no doubt know that I absolutely loved my SIG Sauer P322 and wound up putting about 20,000 rounds through the pistol without issue in the first year of owning it. The previously mentioned P322 COMP version of the pistol brought the P322 platform back up on my radar specifically because it’s directly marketing itself as something that is more “competition-oriented.” While we’re going to settle out which one is the better competition pistol overall in a later article, this week, I figured we could take a closer look at what makes both the P322 and the Ruger MK IV 22/45 great first choices for a rimfire 22LR pistol.

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The Rimfire Report: Was the FN Trombone a Sour Note in Rimfire History?

Welcome back to another edition of The Rimfire Report! This ongoing series is all about the rimfire firearm world. Today I want to talk about slide action or pump action 22LR rifles. They’re absolutely fun, and a great way to introduce new shooters to the sport using a manually operated firearm. While there are a few notable examples throughout the history of pump-action 22LR rifles, they aren’t nearly as popular as lever-action 22LR rifles. Born from the mind of John Moses Browning himself, the FN Trombone is one such example that doesn’t get nearly enough attention. Today we’ll discuss the history of the FN Trombone and talk about some of its features, as well as where you might find one today if you’re an avid historical rifle collector.

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The Rimfire Report: The SIG P322-COMP – Worth the Extra $$$?

Hello and welcome back to another edition of The Rimfire Report! This ongoing series is all bout the rimfire firearm world and all of its different guns, ammunition types, shooting sports, and history. SIG Sauer has recently released a new iteration of their successful P322 pistol – the P322-COMP. I want to start off this week by making it 100% clear that I am completely biased in favor of the P322 pistol already as I personally feel like it has been the single greatest semi-auto 22LR pistol to be released in the last decade. The P322 is an excellent cheap, optics-ready, suppressor-ready package that costs less than $500 – who doesn’t like a good cheap gun? Even with all of that being said, something new like the P322-COMP needs to show us it’s worth the extra dough that SIG is asking for – about $200 or more according to online pricing. I was recently able to take both my original SIG Sauer P322 and the new P322-COMP out to the range to shoot them both side by side to see if the extra features and components are worth the money.

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The Rimfire Report: The H&R "Leatherneck" Marine Corps Rimfire Trainer

Hello and welcome back to another edition of The Rimfire Report! This ongoing series is all about the rimfire firearm world. Last week we checked out the very rare British-made Birmingham Small Arms “Ralock” 22LR semi-auto rifle. A lot of you who had one or shot one said that they were great rifles while others mentioned that the stocks were quite fragile, or that the rifles were particularly a pain in the ass to service. Either way, I really appreciate you sharing your experiences and thoughts with all of us in the comments, it’s great to have firsthand accounts of how these rare pieces actually operated. This week we’re back again with another quite rare rifle, this time one meant for the US Military, specifically the United States Marine Corps. I’m of course talking about the Harrington and Richardson Model 150 also lovingly known as the “Leatherneck.” Made to mimic the much venerated M1 Garand service rifle, the Leatherneck is the United State’s own rimfire trainer. Today we’ll take a look at the heritage of the Leatherneck, and check out what they had and have to offer in terms of reliability, accuracy, and investment value.

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The Rimfire Report: Uncle Fudd's Wild Forward Charging 10/22

Hello and welcome back to another edition of The Rimfire Report! This ongoing series is all about the rimfire firearm world and its many different types of guns, ammo, history, and shooting sports. Last week we talked about a complex gun from the past – the BSA Ralock 22LR takedown rifle. This week we’re setting our sights on something that Uncle Fudd is working on in his garage right now. Uncle Fudd isn’t a derogatory term in this case but rather the name of a man who has a normal day job and kids just like the rest of you, but who just loves tinkering around with his firearms in ways that often turn heads, but probably also turn stomachs for some of you out there. This time Uncle Fudd is working on a new Forward Charging 10/22 rifle. Why? Just because! The 10/22 in all but a rare handful of cases has always ejected and charged from the right-hand side. Uncle Fudd is going to fix that by adding a feature to the 10/22 you never knew you needed – a forward-mounted charging handle stuffed inside of a Grey Birch MFG La Chassis.

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The Rimfire Report: The Complex British-Made BSA Ralock

Hello and welcome back to another edition of The Rimfire Report!  This ongoing series is all about the rimfire firearm world and its many different types of guns, ammo, and shooting sports. Last week we talked about the direction that the rimfire industry might be going and while we were talking about odd designs in the modern age, that got me thinking about quite an odd design that came out of the post-World War II era – the BSA Ralock. BSA or Birmingham Small Arms brought the Ralock rifle to the scene in 1947—an entirely consumer-focused rifle that was a blend of top-notch quality, unique design, and a dash of machine gun inspiration. Let’s dive into what makes this vintage firearm tick, from its funky features and limited production history to where you might find one in the wild today.

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The Rimfire Report: Is The Hammerli Force B1 The Way of the Future?

Hello and welcome back to another edition of The Rimfire Report! This ongoing series is all about the rimfire firearm world and its many different types of firearms, history, trends, ammunition, and much more! The TFB and TFBTV crew have just come back from SHOT Show 2024 and to be honest, it was kind of a blur. This year was probably the busiest we have been and probably the most heavily trafficked I’ve ever seen the show in recent years. That being said, the yearly grind of booth assaults is still one of the most enjoyable events of the year for me mostly because of the good company of the entire TFB/TFBTV crew, but also for the sheer amount of cool and new stuff we get to see. This year I was excited to see a couple of new 22LR offerings including the brand new Hammerli Force B1. This new 10/22-esque-looking firearm not only uses Ruger pattern BX magazines, but it features a quick change barrel system so you can swap between cheap and fun 22LR to the much more potent and reliable 22WMR with a lightning-fast and neat quick change barrel system. While that’s cool news in and of itself, I think the rimfire sector of the firearms industry is finally starting to see a lot more of its deserved attention. As we’ll discuss today, I think the Hammerli Force B1 is a great indicator of things to come in the rimfire firearm world, and of course, take a closer look at this neat new convertible rimfire rifle.

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The Rimfire Report: France's Gevarm 22LR Open Bolt Semi-Auto Rifles

Welcome back to another edition of The Rimfire Report! This ongoing series is about the rimfire firearm world and its many types of rifles, handguns, ammunition, and shooting sports! In the last installment, we brought you all back a bit in time to when the Mitchell Arms company produced one of the most unique and fondly remembered 50-round rotary drum magazines for the Ruger 10/22 rifle. Many people who have owned these, including those of you in the comments, lamented that while they have great memories of shooting with these unique 50-rounders, most of you have stopped due to concerns over the deterioration of the bolt, and other plastic components. I suppose for now they’ll just have to remain a nice rimfire junkie’s collector’s item. This week we’re headed to France, or rather talking about a French-made gun that is not only really rare in the United States, but rare for rimfire firearms in general. We’re talking about our titular firearm for today’s Rimfire Report – the Gevarm series of open-bolt 22LR semi-auto rifles.

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The Rimfire Report: The Forgotten Mitchell 50/22 50-Round 10/22 Magazine

Hello and welcome back to another edition of The Rimfire Report! This ongoing series is all about the rimfire firearm world and all of its guns, shooting sports, ammunition, and of course, rich history! This week we’re taking a look at an old and probably almost forgotten-about accessory for the Ruger 10/22 rifle – the Mitchell 50/22 Magazine, a 50-round drum magazine that is much more than meets the eye when compared to today’s 50-round drum offerings for the Ruger 10/22. What I’ve learned about these nifty magazines recently has made me wish that these rare magazines would make a comeback. So join me today as we explore who the Mitchell Arms company was, how their 50-round drum offering for the 10/22 rifle performed, and of course where you can find these rare magazines now and how much you should expect to pay for one.

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The Rimfire Report: The Eternal Debate – SBR or Takedown 22LR Rifle?

Hello and welcome back to another edition of The Rimfire Report! This ongoing series is all about the rimfire firearm world and its rich history, the extensive array of unique firearms, as well as its fun and enjoyable shooting sports that are accessible to virtually everyone on the globe. Last week we talked about the extremely obscure, rare, and quite honestly pretty cool M6 Scout Rifle. This takedown, folding combination gun is one that many of us seem to have a massive affinity for, even if the concept itself isn’t all that great on paper. I think most of us might rather have a dedicated semi-auto, bolt-action takedown, or SBR 22LR rifle than an M6 as a general-purpose 22LR rifle. So today we’ll be going over the advantages and disadvantages of both, to see what the general consensus is among you, readers, as well as a few of the TFB staff that I’ve asked about the concept.

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