The Ruger Mini-14: Let's Get Real

If you want a Mini-14 buy one.

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Firearm Showcase: Winchester's Forgotten NATO Light Rifle? - at the Cody Firearms Museum - HIGH RES PICS!

In January, just before the 2017 SHOT Show, I got the opportunity to travel to Cody Wyoming to visit the Cody Firearms Museum at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, to see some of their rare firearms and bring photos of them to our readers.

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Firearm Showcase: Mason Experimental 1901 Semiautomatic Rifle at the Cody Firearms Museum - HIGH RES PICS!

In January, just before the 2017 SHOT Show, I got the opportunity to travel to Cody Wyoming to visit the Cody Firearms Museum at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, to see some of their rare firearms and bring photos of them to our readers.

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HK Shows Off the US Army's M110A1 CSASS Compact Sniper Rifle | SHOT 17

At the 2017 SHOT Show, Heckler & Koch was proudly displaying their victorious CSASS entrant, now designated the M110A1 by the US Army. The Compact Semi-Automatic Sniper System competition was created to find a lighter weight, more compact sniper weapon system to replace the Knight’s Armament M110 SASS. The H&K rifle that reportedly won the contract was slightly different than the rifle on display at the show, the latter sporting the new Geissele M-LOK handguard which replaced HK’s proprietary “backwards Keymod” negative attachment handguard.

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Early Selfloader Mania: Italy's First Semiauto Battle Rifle, the Armaguerra Model 1939, with Forgotten Weapons

By this point, it’s impossible to hide my affinity for early selfloading rifles, and today we have another great video from Forgotten Weapons on an early Italian model that made it all the way to adoption. Though the program was cancelled before it could be produced, the Armaguerra Model 1939 rifle is still an important piece of Italian firearms history. You can learn more about it in Ian’s video embedded below:

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A Trip to the Bundeswehr's Fantastic Defense Technology Museum in Koblenz, Part 2: Selfloading Rifles, Cont'd [GUEST POST]

The history of modern small arms is in part so fascinating because of how many firearms have been developed even in obscure circumstances, and how many of those obscure small arms still exist in museums and private collections around the world. Even though I make learning about obscure modern small arms my hobby, I am continually surprised by the new and unique weapons I uncover both on the Internet and in real-life excursions to some of the aforementioned collections.

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A Trip to the Bundeswehr's Fantastic Defense Technology Museum in Koblenz, Part 1: Selfloading Rifles [GUEST POST]

The history of modern small arms is in part so fascinating because of how many firearms have been developed even in obscure circumstances, and how many of those obscure small arms still exist in museums and private collections around the world. Even though I make learning about obscure modern small arms my hobby, I am continually surprised by the new and unique weapons I uncover both on the Internet and in real-life excursions to some of the aforementioned collections.

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Taurus Carbines Seeing Use with Brazilian Police

The Brazilian Polícia Militar do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Rio de Janeiro Military State Police) have adopted the semi-auto only CTT40C carbines, made by Taurus. Below is an embedded video of the PMERJ’s introduction to the new short barreled carbines:

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The Most Advanced Gun in the World (in 1916): The 1916 Meunier Carbine

Beginning in the last decade of the 19th Century, the French government began work on the next great advancement in infantry small arms technology: The selfloading rifle. By 1916, after the outbreak of World War I, they had produced what many consider the most advanced rifle of its time: The Meunier A6 Carbine.

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Toggles 'Till We Die: The Heinemann Side-Toggle Sporting Rifle

Got enough of toggles yet? Of course you haven’t! Forgotten Weapons’ exhaustive coverage of the most interesting and significant auction pieces continues with a very interesting design from a German gun designer who should get more recognition, that being one Karl Heinemann, working for (at the time) Walther:

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Hope You're Not Sick of Toggles Just Yet: A Look at Japanese Toggle-Action Rifles

Is it Toggle Month, or what? Readers of TFB have so far been treated to several posts in April on the famous toggle-locked Luger pistol, but the fun’s not over yet! In the 1930s, the Japanese were – like many major powers at the time – looking to replace their bolt-action Type 38 rifles with more modern selfloading weapons. During this time, John Pedersen, designer of the toggle-retarded blowback Pedersen rifle series, traveled to the islands to demonstrate his design to Japanese Army officials. Pedersen did not successfully sell his rifle anywhere ( despite it being a world-class design), but Japanese arms manufacturers could not quite let go of Pedersen’s ideas. Ian McCollum of the Forgotten Weapons YouTube channel takes a look at two such rifles designed and manufactured by Japanese companies, but based on Pedersen’s excellent rifle. These are the Tokyo Gas & Electric rifle, and the Nippon Special Steel rifle, videos on both being embedded in that order below:

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The CZ Model S Early Selfloading Rifle

Well, it’s no secret that I am a sucker for early selfloading rifles. The sheer number of ideas that were being explored in the early decades when these rifles were undergoing military trials creates a fascinating body of work for us gun nerds in the modern day to study. One area that doesn’t get enough attention is the developments of gun designers in Central Europe before World War II. We previously posted on the ZH-29, one of the most important milestones in the story of the military selfloading rifle, but today we’ll take a look at a video released by Forgotten Weapons on another rifle designed by the same talented designer, Emmanuel Holek. That rifle is the CZ Model S:

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The Swiss SK-46 Semiauto: Last Gasp of the Semi/Manual Hybrid

The world of early semiautomatic rifles is a wild, untamed one. The conventions that are virtually set in stone today as best practices didn’t exist, and a seemingly endless combination of requirements and ideas came together to produce some truly weird and wonderful firearms.

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Thales Introduces Police Semiautomatic F90

News from IWA 2016, Lithgow Arms, the small arms division of Australian defense conglomerate Thales, and former government arsenal, has announced that they will be offering a semiautomatic version of their F90 military rifle for the law enforcement/police market, as a patrol rifle. The F90 was developed by Thales to replace the AUG F88 Austeyr bullpup rifle, upon which it is based.

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TINCANBANDIT On The Forgotten Remington Model 16

Probably the biggest reason firearms history is so charming to someone like me is the virtually endless number of different designs that exist. The ceiling for entry to become a firearms designer has historically been extremely low, and with that comes a plethora of ideas, designs, and concepts that reached various levels of fruition. Studying the subject means continually learning about new weapons, and in this case TINCANBANDIT has given us a valuable education on the early Remington autoloading rimfire rifle, the Model 16.

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