Review: 5.11 Tactical Range Ready Trainer Bag 50L

When we plan a day at the range for leisure or competitive practice, we understandably are going to look like we are packing for a 3-day camping trip. You need to have your eye protection, hearing protection, firearms, ammunition, targets, and those are just the bare necessities. What about tools for maintenance? A speedloader for that stiff magazine? And snacks?! When you think of all the things you might need it becomes a long list that could require multiple bags (raises hand – guilty as charged). Why not spring some money for a better solution? A range bag that carries everything you need including that Snickers bar so you are never hungry. Enter 5.11 Tactical with their Range Ready Trainer Bag in a 50 Liter volume size. We are going to review this range bag to see if it has what it takes to carry all of our range gear. Let’s dive in!

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Ruger American Ranch Rifle Review on TFBTV

In this episode of TFBTV, James Reeves discusses building the quietest budget bolt action rifle. It’s hard to beat a bolt action .300 Blackout when you look at versatility and suppressed performance, so James starts with a Ruger American Ranch rifle in .300 BLK (and performs a full review of the Ruger American Ranch .300 Blackout while we’re here). This rifle often hits prices below $500 so it’s a great budget option for those of you who want to get into ultra-quiet suppressed performance. Add glass and a suppressor and a sling and you’re good to go. James walks you through his build today.

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TFB Review: The Springfield Armory Hellcat Pro with HEX Wasp

I remember when the goal of all new cellphones was to be as compact as possible, even if that meant the buttons were almost impossible to use. Since then, there has been a trend of phones getting bigger, as people are seeing the benefit of choosing added capability instead of convenience. However, the rapid advancement of technology has landed us in a pretty sweet middle ground. Modern cell phones have all of the features we need while staying compact. Everything I just said about phones has been mirrored by the concealable handgun market. With advancements in magazines, belts, and holsters, carrying a larger, more capable firearm has become a more accessible option, and we seem to have landed in that same middle ground. Holding a flush 15 rounds, plus coming with a Picatinny rail, 3.7″ barrel, and an optics-ready slide, this is the new Hellcat Pro from Springfield Armory.

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TFB Review: SIG Sauer's P226 Legion RXP

Over the last few years, there have been a number of legendary models from gun companies being brought into the modern times with the inclusion of optic cuts and upgraded sights as well as tuning specific parts of a firearm. This is exactly the case with the new SIG Sauer P226 Legion RXP variant.

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TFB Review: Type A CQBR Block II

For the last two years, the gun industry has been a tough place to navigate. Between material shortages and panic buying, certain firearms have been difficult or even impossible to find. Luke C reported earlier this year about the CQBR Block II being released and I have been waiting patiently for about 7 months for this AR pistol. After the weight and price, was it worth it? Let’s take a look at the Type A CQBR Block II.

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TFB Review: H&K's New and Improved VP9 Series Pistols

Before releasing the first VP9 in 2014, Heckler & Koch had worked on the design for more than four years. Although they hadn’t been in the striker-fired pistol game for some time at that juncture, H&K was not new to the concept either, having pioneered the VP70 and P7 models more than three decades prior. Released in 1970 and 1979 respectively, these early striker-fired guns were not the norm at the time, as striker functionality wouldn’t begin seeing more widespread adoption until years later. The VP70 was notable for being the first polymer-framed handgun in production, predating first-gen Glocks by more than a decade. Both of these pistols enjoyed good reception and adoption, as well as a solid service history. In particular, the P7 managed to stay in production all the way until 2008, nearly thirty years after its introduction. Following the P7’s retirement in ’08, Heckler & Koch saw the writing on the wall. Although hammer-fired handguns and metal frames were by no means obsolete at that point, market demand was clear. Polymer frames and striker-fired mechanisms had essentially become the standard and were a must-have offering if a manufacturer hoped to compete in the pistol market. With a request from the Bavarian State Police to update their arsenal of aging P7s, in 2010 the German firm got back to work in this space.

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TFB Review: Swampfox Optics Blade and Trihawk Prism Scopes

Swampfox Optics is a relative newcomer to the world of firearms glass. They recently turned two years old, having been founded on Independence Day in 2018. Students of American history will already have observed that their link to the founding of the United States doesn’t simply coincide with shared birthdays. The company’s name hearkens back to one of America’s first warfighting heroes, Francis Marion. Marion earned his “Swamp Fox” nickname during the American Revolutionary War, in which he served as a Continental Army officer. The name came about due to Marion’s expertise in irregular warfare and guerilla tactics, which he had learned from Cherokee fighters during the French and Indian War. His unusual (for the time) methods proved highly effective against Redcoat forces, and repeatedly served to frustrate the British. This caused the Brits to send Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton on a special mission to hunt down the wily American. Marion led his small band on a 26-mile evasive maneuver, which allowed them to slip away from Tarleton’s men by escaping through a system of swamp trails. Then resigned to his failure, Tarleton is reported to have cursed, “As for this damned old fox, the Devil himself could not catch him.” Thus the legend of the “Swamp Fox” was born. Today, Swampfox Optics draws inspiration and a sort of spiritual descendancy from Marion.

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TFB Review: Holosun 507K Mini Red Dot Sight

In the early days following their founding just seven years ago, Holosun’s optics sat firmly in the “budget” category. I think it’s fair to say that in general they were not particularly highly regarded. Although some shooters liked them just fine, others certainly did not, and at first, they didn’t appear to be a threat to unseat any titans of the gun glass world. However, as is usually the case with companies who survive the struggles of their first few years, they’ve made notable improvements since their humble genesis, and have taken some pointed lessons learned. Holosun in 2020 is not the same as they were in 2015, and today ever more shooters are becoming believers in products they wouldn’t have considered in the not-so-distant past. Consumers have taken notice, as have competitors, with Holosun’s pistol red dots, in particular, seeming to be gaining a fair amount market share.

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TFB REVIEW: MAVEN Spotting Scope – The CS.1 Variable Power

Looking through quality glass is a life-changing experience. Where you once thought that your Walmart binoculars or $150 Amazon scopes were “just as good”, you now felt as if you had supernatural powers. Not long ago, mind-bending optical clarity first required receiving an inheritance or a bank loan. But in 2020, a mid-priced optic can provide the user with a professional view of world without the tuition payment costs. At the risk of alienating you with my bad puns, the CS.1 Maven spotting scope is a real eye opener for an obtainable price of $650.

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Ban State MP5 – The Compliant PTR-9R

Did you know that an M.A./N.J. compliant PTR-9R is identical to a non-compliant 9R? Except that it ships with 10-round magazines. I didn’t, at least not until PTR sent me one to review. Opening the box on this beauty has probably made it into the top 5 of my favorite moments working for TFB. There’s just something incredibly sexy about an MP5, or in this case, an MP5 clone. Heckler and Koch worked some kraut space magic into that gun.

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Glock 44: In-Depth Review of Glock's First .22 LR on TFBTV

In this episode of TFBTV, @James Reeves brings you a FULL REVIEW of the NEW Glock 44 direct from the Glock Factory in Deutsch-Wagram, Austria. Here’s the complete rundown and range session.

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TFBTV Reviews The Ultimate Tactical Shotgun? The IWI Tavor TS12 Review

In this episode of TFBTV, James discusses his review of the three prototype copies of the IWI TS12 he has used over the past few months. Is this the ultimate tactical shotgun?

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TFB 6 Month Review – The PWS MK116 MOD 2-M

Over the last 6 months, I’ve run the Primary Weapons Systems as my main rifle and it’s been an interesting ride. When I first started looking at PWS line up of guns, I was really curious how the long stroke gas piston system worked so I ordered the MK116 MOD 2-M rifle. The rifle may look like an AR-15 but apart from looks, the gun is almost entirely different from your standard AR rifle.

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TFB Review: SIG Sauer MCX Rattler – 1 Year Later

Most of you guys will probably understand when I say I have a list of guns I’d love to own someday, but it’s always followed up by “if I win the lottery.” I have a few of those guns on my list but when I saw the new MCX Rattler from SIG Sauer, I felt like it was something fresh in the market and that was exciting to me. I checked it out at SHOT Show and NRA’s annual meeting last year. I always thought it was a useful system and again I was interested in shooting it. Thankfully, I found one and had the opportunity to buy it, so I did! Let’s get into what I think about it one year later.

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TFB Review: The Beretta M9A3 Pistol

A couple of months ago, I finally decided to take the plunge and order an all black Beretta M9A3. Earlier this year I shot and tested out the FDE version. That version was designed to update the Beretta M9 series that served as the standard issue sidearm for the military for the last few decades. As we know now, the military decided to go with SIG Sauer’s P320 modular system instead, but the M9A3 is the newest version of the workhorse platform. The FDE version of the M9A3 I shot had the manual safety that is well known on the 92 series. When I opened up my black M9A3, the first thing I noticed was the manual safety was replaced with a decocker only feature, and that is awesome.

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