POTD: M27 and M38 Live-Fire Action at Range 410A

In today’s  Photo Of The Day we take a closer look at a group of U.S. Marine Corps infantry riflemen with 1st Battalion, 25th Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division as they participate in an Integrated Training Exercise called 5-19. Location: Twentynine Palms, California, in the year 2019.

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POTD: The M27 in Exercise Bougainville

The M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle can be seen above, in our Photo Of The Day from the island of Hawaii, at the Marine Corps Base in August 2020. The M27 is based on the H&K HK416. The U.S. Marine Corps soldier is communicating with his fellow soldiers, as they execute a squad attack during Exercise Bougainville I. The exercise Bougainville I was designed to train and evaluate team leaders in small unit proficiency and increase the Battalion’s overall combat readiness.

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POTD: M27 in United Arab Emirates
POTD: 3rd Battalion, 8th Marines with the M27 and the M38 DMR

Above we can see a U.S. Marines with the 3rd Battalion 8th Marine Regiment as he fires the M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle (based on the H&K HK416) during a live-fire weapons exercise at range F-18 on Camp Lejeune, N.C. That’s the subject for this Photo Of The Day, where we look back to 2017.

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USMC Confirms Plans to Adopt the Next Generation Squad Weapon

The US Marine Corps has recently undergone a top down doctrinal reevaluation of its future role. As part of these changes in the make up of the Corps have been planned and now a brand new initiative has also been launched – Marine Corps Systems Command’s Program Manager for Infantry Weapons has begun a large-scale modernisation program to increase the lethality of the Marine infantry squad.

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POTD: U.S. Marines in Japan with M32 Multiple Grenade Launcher and M38 DMR

Photo Of The Day and above we’re looking at a 40 mm “potato” being fired out of an M32 Multiple Grenade Launcher. The photos are taken at the Yausubetsu Training Area in Hokkaido, Japan, during exercise Northern Viper. The soldiers are from U.S. Marines 1st Battalion, 25th Marine Regiment.

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POTD: USMC Night Ops

The USMC have shared some pretty arty photos from the recent Integrated Training Exercise 5-19 with 1st Battalion, 25th Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division. The photos were taken at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, California at the beginning of August by  Lance Cpl. Jose Gonzalez. The most striking images feature Lance Cpl. Eliott Wright, posing with his M27 rifle. 

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POTD: Alpha Fleet Anti-terrorism Security Team with B&T APR308, M27, AKs & M110 SASS

Today’s Photo Of The Day shows a variety of interesting and (relatively) rare firearms.

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Congress Moves to Slow USMC's Wider Adoption of M27

In April, the US Marine Corps announced an ambitious procurement programme to purchase 15,000 M27 Individual Automatic Rifles from Heckler & Koch. The contract, worth $30 million, was to begin to be fulfilled with funds from fiscal year 2019.

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USMC NOT Evaluating Accessories for M27 Upgrade

It has been suggested that the US Marine Corps’ Weapons Training Battalion at the Quantico Marine Corps Base is currently evaluating accessories for the M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle. The reality, however, is that the M27s, recently ordered by the Corps, will be identical to their first batches of rifles ordered back in 2007.

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LEAKED: USMC Test Calls M27, M38 DMR Into Question

On the heels of the USMC’s effort to field 15,000 more Heckler & Koch M27 Infantry Automatic Rifles, as well as the M38 Designated Marksman Rifle variant, The Firearm Blog has received a copy of a 2016 report intended to justify procurement of accessories and additional M27s to fill a need for a special purpose rifle (SPR). The report documents a test conducted at Quantico, Virginia, by the Product Manager, Infantry Weapons Product Management Office (PdM IW). 9 M27 IARs were tested, each firing 2700 rounds over the course of the test. Notably, the Lead Engineer and Assistant Product Manager for this test was the recently-retired Salvatore Fanelli, who worked at Heckler & Koch in the early-mid 2000s.

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Marine Corps Seeking to Buy More M27 IARs

In recent months the Corps has been increasingly open about its intentions to adopt the M27 as its standard issue rifle. Back in August 2017, the USMC released a sole source notice for the acquisition of as many as 50,000 M27 Infantry Automatic Rifles. It now seems the Corps will be acquiring the new rifles in smaller numbers initially.

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MARSOC NOT Interested in the M27… But the M38 Looks Promising

A recently released Marine Corps Times article covers a discussion with a MARSOC spokesman who confirmed in no uncertain terms that the command was not interested in an M27 IAR procurement program. The reasons stated involved the Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures (TTPs) of MARSOC, working in confined quarters and requiring not only a shorter barrel for these types of operations but also a weapon in which adding a suppressor to won’t make it even longer. Also mentioned was a statement about the lack of compatibility with the SOCOM upper receiver group to be mounted on an M27’s lower receiver. On top of both of these concerns is that MARSOC appears to be quite content with having a belt-fed light machine gun integral to the small teams in which they operate from. Previously this has been the M249 SAW, but currently, MARSOC is fielding the FN Herstal 7.62x51mm NATO Mk.48.

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US Army's XM1158 ADVAP Round REVEALED: Tungsten-Cored EPR-Based Design Is Cheaper, Quicker to Produce

Until now, the US Army’s 7.62mm XM1158 Advanced Armor Piercing (ADVAP) round has been a mystery. The round, which was rumored to be the basis for the now-cancelled Interim Combat Service Rifle (ICSR) program, is supposed to allow existing weapons in the 7.62x51mm caliber to defeat advanced body armor out to combat ranges. Speculations about its configuration ranged from an improved traditional tungsten cored round to a discarding sabot design firing uranium flechettes, but the answer to this mystery was recently revealed in an issue of the Picatinny Voice. The ADVAP, it seems, is built on the technology of the 7.62mm M80A1 EPR, but using a tungsten core. From the Picatinny Voice article by Audra Calloway:

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M855A1 EPR Officially Adopted By US Marine Corps

The United States Marine Corps has finally officially announced its adoption of the 5.56mm M855A1 EPR round, developed in the late 2000s by the US Army, marking an important step towards ammunition commonality between the two services. Until now, the USMC has officially only used the legacy M855 round, and to a more limited extent the SOCOM-developed Mk. 318 SOST round, refusing to adopt the US Army’s new M855A1. The Marine Corps Times reports that the Corps’ Combat Development Command has begun procuring the round for stockpiles, with its official adoption coming in 2018:

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