TFB Armorer's Bench: By The Armorer Book – M1 Garand Maintenance

Welcome everyone to the  TFB Armorer’s Bench! As mentioned in the little blurb below, this series will focus on a lot of home armorer and gunsmith activities. In this article, I figured with Memorial Day around the corner it may be a good opportunity to talk about M1 Garand maintenance or even a touch of general firearm maintenance and conservation. The last time we did something like this was with a Glock and a Glock Armorer’s Book. Perhaps you have Pappy’s M1 and want to clean it according to the military manuals or you just want to be on top of preservation. Let’s dive right in!

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CMP Offers Navy 7.62 NATO Garand Rifles For Sale

The Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) has a new batch of 7.62 NATO Garand rifles for sale to qualified purchasers. These rifles came from US Navy stores. Let’s check these unique rifles out.

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The USGI Web Sling – More Than Just A Carrying Strap

The classic USGI web sling has been fielded on rifles since World War 2. It has seen action on the M-1 Garand, M-14, and M-16 rifles, and it provides both a method to carry a rifle and a loop sling for precision marksmanship use. Let’s take a closer look at this sling and its hidden talents.

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Grace Optics M1 Topless Reflex Sight

Topless – that’s what Grace Optics calls the design of their M1 red dot sight because as you can see in the pictures, it lacks a top strap of the housing over the window. The advantage of this design is that it provides a less obstructed field of view which should result in faster target acquisition. Grace Optics claims that despite this open-top design, the M1 sight is still very robust because “the glass is very strong and the side bars make it just as strong as any other sight on the market“.

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[SHOT 2018] Kahr Teases Tactical Thompson Carbine

If you’re one of those people who think the Thompson submachine gun never should have gone away, then Kahr Arms (Auto Ordnance) has the gun for you. Displayed at their booth at the 2018 SHOT Show is a Thompson different than any of the other semiauto Thompson recreations in their catalog. Decked out in black tactical furniture, and featuring a unique railed receiver, this weapon is a Thompson updated for the 21st Century.

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AimLock Stabilized Weapon Platform Displayed at [AUSA 2017]

Working under contract from the Army’s Research, Development, and Engineering Command (RDECOM), AimLock, a subsidiary of Rocky Mountain Scientific Laboratory, developed an actively stabilized weapons chassis for AR-15 rifles. AimLock has been in the news before for their stabilized rifle platform, which was shown off in a presentation at the 2016 National Defense Industry Association conference and subsequently reported on in Futurism and Popular Mechanics, and, of course, here at TFB.

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The Ruger Mini-14: Let's Get Real

If you want a Mini-14 buy one.

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Kalashnikov vs. Schmeisser: Myths, Legends, and Misconceptions [GUEST POST]

The following is an article that was originally written in Russian by TFB contributor Maxim Popenker, and Andrey Ulanov, and translated to English by Peter Samsonov. With their permission, I have replicated the text here, and edited it, for the enrichment of you, our readers!

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Break That Case: A Visceral Illustration of Primary Extraction, with Bloke on the Range

Back in the days of the fighting bolt action rifle, clever small arms designers came up with  a number of minor but ingenious features to make the soldier’s life a little less hard when trying to cycle their rifle’s action by hand as they faced down the enemy. Many of these special features have since made their way into many of the world’s modern hunting rifles, but they were pioneered by designers coming up with new and better weapons of war.

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Deconstructing "Assault Rifle": The Quest for Universality in Modern Infantry Warfare

Quick: What’s the definition of “assault rifle”? I’ll give you a moment to think about it.

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Modern Personal Defense Weapon Calibers 004: The 7.5x27mm FK Brno

It’s been a while since we’ve done one of these Modern PDW Calibers installments, but we’re back, and today we’re looking at a very new round on the market, one that is currently making some pretty big waves in the pistol world. I am talking of course about the 7.5x27mm FK Brno, designed for the CZ-75-derived FK Field Pistol from the company that shares its name. A high velocity .30 cal pistol round is not a new idea, having predecessors in the .300 JAWS, 7.62×25 Tokarev, and others, but what makes the 7.5 FK so interesting is just how powerful it is: A 103 grain monolithic bullet is advertised as leaving the 6″ Field Pistol barrel at an incredible 2,000 ft/s! This means that, if the company’s performance claims are true, the FK Field Pistol is ballistically the equal of the old WWII-era M1 Carbine!

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Walther PPS M1: The First Single Stack 9mm Glock?

The Walther PPS M1 was introduced in 2005, well before the Glock 43 or the Smith & Wesson Shield. For many years The PPS was one of the go to single stack 9mm pistols for concealed carriers with the Kahr PM series being the other option for those looking at polymer framed guns. In recent years the PPS M1 has fallen off the radar of many gun owners thanks to the introduction of the Shield that can be bought for about a hundred dollars less but I still feel as though the M1 is very relevant for those looking for a single stack gun today.

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Did GIs "Fake Out" German and Japanese Soldiers with False M1 *PINGS*? Bloke Explains Why Not

If a Garand pings in the woods, and no one is around to hear it, did it make a sound? The answer is “yes”, because German super-hearing allows them to detect high-pitched noises from up to a kilometer away!

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Winchester's Magazine-Fed M1 Garand Variants at the Cody Museum, Courtesy Forgotten Weapons

In the fourth part of the series of articles I am writing on the Lightweight Rifle program of the 1940s and ’50s, we looked at some of the experimental rifles that were being tested and evaluated during and just after World War II as potential replacements for or upgrades to the excellent M1 Garand semiautomatic rifle. The goal of these programs was ambitious: To create a rifle – based on the M1 – that would provide all the functions of the military infantry rifle, submachine gun, and automatic rifle, thereby achieving the “all in one” squad level infantry small arms package. This concept was called the “paratroop rifle”, possibly in reference to the German Fallschirmjeagergewehr (translated: paratroop rifle) FG-42 which itself was designed as an “all in one” weapon for paratroops.

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Bloke on the Range Tests the DEADLY M1 Garand Flaw that got GIs KILLED in WWII… (Actually No, Probably Not)

We’ve all heard it at gun shows or with friends: The M1 Garand was the first rifle that brought true semiautomatic firepower to the battlefield, but it came with a fatal flaw – the ping, which would alert German soldiers that the hapless GI was out of ammo, allowing them to pop up and strike!

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