10 Reasons Why Vz. 58 is NOT an AK

No, Vz. 58 is not an AK version. The recently released video by Kalashnikov Media was just a good additional source to start talking about this topic. This rifle is so many times confused with the AK, that even Kalashnikov Media dedicated a separate video in their video series called “Kalashnikov: Around the World” to tell the history of this Czechoslovakian firearm and explain why it is not an AK. The point of this article is to show that these are different rifles. Which one is a superior design? It is an arguable matter. Both have advantages and shortcomings.

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Czech Small Arms Introduces vz.15 Ultra Low Bore Axis Pistol

Is 2017 the Year of the Low Bore Axis? It seems like it just might be! Amid a sea of other pistols advertised as having low bore axes ( some of which do deliver on that claim), the Jablunka-based Czech Small Arms has introduced a new pistol with about as low a bore axis as is possible on a gun with the magazine feeding through the grip. The new handgun was introduced at IWA 2017, and is called the vz.15. CzechPoint posted photos of the new gun on their Facebook page:

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Modern Personal Defense Weapon Calibers 004: The 7.5x27mm FK Brno

It’s been a while since we’ve done one of these Modern PDW Calibers installments, but we’re back, and today we’re looking at a very new round on the market, one that is currently making some pretty big waves in the pistol world. I am talking of course about the 7.5x27mm FK Brno, designed for the CZ-75-derived FK Field Pistol from the company that shares its name. A high velocity .30 cal pistol round is not a new idea, having predecessors in the .300 JAWS, 7.62×25 Tokarev, and others, but what makes the 7.5 FK so interesting is just how powerful it is: A 103 grain monolithic bullet is advertised as leaving the 6″ Field Pistol barrel at an incredible 2,000 ft/s! This means that, if the company’s performance claims are true, the FK Field Pistol is ballistically the equal of the old WWII-era M1 Carbine!

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Modern Historical Intermediate Calibers 020: The 7.62x45mm Czech

After World War II, the nations of the world retired to lick their wounds and rebuild, but their arms engineers also began thinking about the next war. The war have brought forth a storm of new technologies and inventions, and one of the most significant in the field of small arms was the finally mature assault rifle in the form of the Nazi-developed “Sturmgewehr”, and its intermediate 7.92x33mm Kurzpatrone cartridge. One nation that took notice of this new weapon and its ammunition was the newly reconstituted Czechoslovakia. That nations engineers quickly took to copying and improving the 7.92 Kurz caliber, producing by the early 1950s a short-lived but unique round called the 7.62x45mm Kr.52, or more popularly the 7.62×45 Czech. The 7.62×45’s projectile was a near copy of the Kurzpatrone’s stubby, steel-cored one, but its case was much longer, while being slightly thinner, and having a greater internal volume. This gave the Czech round an additional 250 ft/s muzzle velocity versus the German 7.92×33 when fired from the barrel of the rifle that was designed alongside it, the strange but wonderful vz. 52.

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CZ Bren 2 Finally Makes Debut on International Market

At the 2016 Eurosatory defense trade show, Czech gunmaker CZ debuted for the first time its improved 806 Bren 2 rifle on the international market. The Bren 2 was announced in October of 2015, and improves on the 805 Bren by being lighter, having an improved selector with no two round burst feature, and other improvements based on feedback from the Army of the Czech Republic.

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The CZ Model S Early Selfloading Rifle

Well, it’s no secret that I am a sucker for early selfloading rifles. The sheer number of ideas that were being explored in the early decades when these rifles were undergoing military trials creates a fascinating body of work for us gun nerds in the modern day to study. One area that doesn’t get enough attention is the developments of gun designers in Central Europe before World War II. We previously posted on the ZH-29, one of the most important milestones in the story of the military selfloading rifle, but today we’ll take a look at a video released by Forgotten Weapons on another rifle designed by the same talented designer, Emmanuel Holek. That rifle is the CZ Model S:

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The Mud Will Always Get Through: InRange Desecrates A vz. 58

The vz. 58 is a rifle well-known for being easily mistaken for – but totally different from – an AK. Everything down to the locking mechanism, fire control group, and operating mechanism is different from the famous Kalashnikov, despite appearances. In fact, the vz. 58 rifle was a huge achievement for the relatively small country of Czechoslovakia (now the Czech Republic and Slovakia), as they had produced a weapon every bit as good as its contemporaries from the superpowers. Certainly, a gun’s merits can’t be boiled down to a simple mud test… But it wouldn’t hurt to see how it does anyway, right?

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CzechPoint Now Producing Vz. 58 Rifles In-House

The Vz. 58 rifle is one rifle that gets much less recognition as a design than it deserves. Its front-tilting locking block design is unique and works very well, and the rifle itself is both lightweight and reliable. CzechPoint, which has been for a long time a distributor of these rifles, has decided to begin producing Vz. 58s themselves, using a combination of newly manufactured parts made in Czech tooling (and with personnel trained by Czech technicians) and surplus parts. A more in-depth description is below:

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Strange Guns: CZ 52 "Police Carbine" In 7.62×39

The Vz. 52 rifle is a favorite of mine; it hits all the right notes for being “weird”: It shoots a weird caliber – 7.62x45 (nope, that’s not a typo!), uses a weird operating mechanism (a forward-tilting bolt), and has a great big integral side-folding bayonet that looks a bit like a Roman gladius. So when I saw this conversion of a Vz. 52 on GunLab, I had a mixed reaction:

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