Annex Defense Launches Rubber Protective Case For Garmin Xero C1

Garmin’s Xero C1 chronograph is the hottest chrono on the market, but Annex Defense is making it even better. The new rubber protective case adds an additional layer of insurance around these $600 pocket chronographs. Let’s look at the available models.

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TFB Review: Garmin Xero C1 Pro Chronograph

Garmin made some real shockwaves when it introduced the Xero C1 Pro Chronograph. It fits the advanced technology of a radar chronograph into a handy little pocket-sized tool with a simple setup and operation. Let’s see if it lives up to the hype.

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Garmin Xero C1 Pro Chronograph – For Suppressed Fire & More

For people who truly nerd out at the range making handloads and chronicling data via a chronograph, we have exciting news by the way of Garmin with their latest product announcement. The new Garmin Xero C1 Pro chronograph couples modern technologies and is impressive in what it can accomplish for you. Even registering suppressed fire and odd muzzle devices for an assortment of firearms.

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TFB Review: BulletSeeker (Speedtracker) Mini Doppler Chronograph

Do you want to get more out of shooting? Have you considered getting a chronograph? Measuring the muzzle velocity of your projectiles is helpful, especially for load development and calculating bullet drop at distance. Well, I bought the Bulletseeker Mach4 chronograph and have been using it this past year so I will share my experience with you.

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TFB Review: MagnetoSpeed Sporter Chronograph

For decades, chronographs were a device set up in front of the firing line. That all changed with the introduction of the MagnetoSpeed as they mounted the chronograph to the barrel. So is this change an improvement or not? Let’s find out in this review of the MagnetoSpeed Sporter chronograph.

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Wheelgun Wednesday: Attempting to Chronograph the Raging Hunter

Over the past couple of weeks, we have taken a look at one of Taurus’ newest firearm introductions for 2021 in the Taurus Raging Hunter chambered for .460 S&W Magnum. Their entire series of Raging Hunter revolvers in their various barrel lengths, cartridges, and finishes have been tremendously popular since their inception, but the .460 S&W Magnum especially caught my eye. Maybe it is a guy thing or I have masochistic tendencies when it comes to recoil, but the Taurus Raging Hunter 460 sounded incredibly fun! One thing you criticized myself for was not getting any chronograph readings on the Taurus Raging Hunter 460 while reviewing it.

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The Rimfire Report: FX Airguns Pocket Chronograph

Welcome to a guest-written edition of The Rimfire Report. This is Nicholas C. helping out Luke C. Today I will share with you a handy little device that fits in your pocket, range bag or ammo can – the FX Airguns Pocket Chronograph. It is like a pocket LabRadar.

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Review: Chronographing 12 cartridges in the Non-Restricted 18″ Ruger PCC

This chronograph test should be of interest for those who already own, or are looking to get, a Ruger PC Carbine in 9×19 mm with the “hunting legal” 18.62″ barrel.  Or the “non-restricted version“, as the term is in some places ( Canada for instance).

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Labradar Releases New App

Labradar produces the most prominent commercially available radar-based chronograph for firearms use.  Prior to the Labradar, and the magnetospeed which is a good chronograph in its own right, the most accurate way of getting muzzle velocities was to take multiple light gate style chronographs run them in series, shoot through all of them, then take an average.  Yes, there were other options such as industrial grade radar units on the market but they were cost prohibitive for the average shooter.  Click HERE for another informative article comparing the Labradar against industrial grade radar chronograph.

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BIG Freakin' Cartridge Test, DISCUSSION 02: What's Next?

The Big Freakin’ Cartridge Test’s first batch of 6 rounds is through, but there’s more to come. In the last post, we reflected on the test methodology, and some possible solutions. In this post, we’ll talk about what you can expect in the future.

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BIG Freakin' Cartridge Test, DISCUSSION 01: What Happened?

We’ve seen how the 6 different .223 Remington and 5.56mm loads have fared in the Big Freakin’ Cartridge Test, but we still have more to talk about. Specifically, we need to discuss what I did wrong (or what I am not satisfied with), and what I plan to do next. This post will concern the former, and a second installment will cover the latter.

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BIG Freakin' Cartridge Test 012: RUAG SS109 (M855 Equivalent) 5.56mm NATO, 16 and 20 Barrels

Next up for  the Big Freakin’ Cartridge Test is RUAG Ammotec’s version of the NATO-standard SS109 round (equivalent to US M855). I believe the ammunition I tested may have been made in RUAG’s facility in Thun, Switzerland, although I have not confirmed that.

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BIG Freakin' Cartridge Test 011: RUAG SS109 (M855 Equivalent) 5.56mm NATO, 14.5 Barrel, and Accuracy

Next up for  the Big Freakin’ Cartridge Test is RUAG Ammotec’s version of the NATO-standard SS109 round (equivalent to US M855). I believe the ammunition I tested may have been made in RUAG’s facility in Thun, Switzerland, although I have not confirmed that. The test procedure was as follows:

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BIG Freakin' Cartridge Test 010: Mk. 318 Mod. 0 62gr SOST (T556TNB1), 16 and 20 Barrels

Next up for  the Big Freakin’ Cartridge Test is Federal’s T556TNB1 load, which is the civilian market name for the Mk.318 SOST projectile developed by US SOCOM as a “barrier blind” round for the M4 Carbine and Mk. 18 CQB upper receiver. This ammunition uses a reverse drawn jacket to improve accuracy, and couples a fragmenting front end with a solid gilding metal base that improves penetration through tough barriers. I love this ammunition and use it religiously for home defense.  Continuing on from the last installment, we are now looking at the velocity test results for the 20″ barrel (more on the 16″ later).

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BIG Freakin' Cartridge Test 009: Mk. 318 Mod. 0 62gr SOST (T556TNB1), 14.5 Barrel, and Accuracy

Next up for  the Big Freakin’ Cartridge Test is Federal’s T556TNB1 load, which is the civilian market name for the Mk.318 SOST projectile developed by US SOCOM as a “barrier blind” round for the M4 Carbine and Mk. 18 CQB upper receiver. This ammunition uses a reverse drawn jacket to improve accuracy, and couples a fragmenting front end with a solid gilding metal base that improves penetration through tough barriers. I love this ammunition, and use it religiously for home defense. The test procedure was as follows:

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