Brouwer LLC Introduces M1811 Grip Module for SIG SAUER P320 Pistols

    Brouwer LLC Introduces M1811 Grip Module for SIG SAUER P320 Pistols

    M1811 Grip Module (Brouwer)

    If you like the idea of the SIG Sauer P320 but can’t get on with the popular pistol’s grip profile, Brouwer LLC might just have the answer for you – a new grip module that mimics the classic 1911’s ergonomics and grip angle but allows the use of the P320’s features. The M1811 is available in both black and coyote and has an MSRP of $89.95.

    P320 Grip Module Articles @ TFB:

    Brouwer LLC Introduces M1811 Grip Module for SIG SAUER P320 Pistols

    M1811 Grip Module (Brouwer)

    From Brouwer:

    The Brouwer M1811 Grip Module corrects the main ergonomic issues with the P320 platform – high bore axis, rounded slippery grip, short beavertail. The modern M1911 pistol is the standard for shooting performance, control, and ergonomics. The overall grip shape, feel, and design of the modern 1911 has not been replicated until now. With the design of the SIG P320 series, we were able to bring some of that performance and control to polymer pistols.

    Improved Handling:

    The Brouwer P320 Grip Module greatly improves point of aim repeatability by utilizing ergonomics nearly identical to the 1911 grip angle. The front strap angle has been changed to 107.5 degrees, with a back strap angle of 67.5 degrees to cause the pistol to seat into the hand when gripped. This geometry aids the shooter by placing the bore axis in a natural position.

    The beaver tail has been moved up to reduce the height over bore while still maintaining the full functionality of the SIG P320 fire control group. The beaver tail has been profiled to draw the hand into the gun while providing a large surface to aid in reducing the effort to mitigate recoil. The rear profile of the beaver tail has been shaped to reduce catching the web of the user’s hand when gripping the gun promoting quick grip acquisition.

    A large trigger guard was kept to ensure use with gloves in cold weather and reprofiled to remove unnecessary features. The Profile of the trigger guard was moved up as high as possible to improve grip index relative to the beavertail while maintaining clearance for the P320 trigger. The tolerancing for the mag release button has been reduced to combat dust ingress.

    Grip Texture

    Simulated side scales similar to the 1911 are present to stiffen the grip and fill the natural void in the palm of the hand without increasing the front and back strap radii. The front and back strap have been checkered with 25 lines per inch to improve grip without damaging clothing.

    Improved magwell design

    The grip modules magwell has been profiled to ensure a loaded magazine can be inserted at up to 45 degrees out of rotation, and 20 degrees out of axial  alignment with the magwell.

    Magwell Extension

    The grip module is capable of accepting an additional flared magwell extension should the user desire. (Coming Soon).

    Accessory Rail

    A MIL-STD-1913 Picatinny rail is maintained under the slide in front of the trigger guard. Note, installation of a light, or underbarrel attachment adjusted for a P320 may require a universal mount adapter as the trigger guard has been improved.

    M1811 Grip Module in black (Brouwer)

    Brouwer say the grip module is designed to use all of the factory-made parts that make up a P320 including the fire control unit, magazine catch (reversible), slide stop and takedown pin. The grip module accepts factory SIG P320 magazines (both 17rd, and 21rd) and is compatible with P320s equipped with a safety.

    Find out more at: brouwersolutions.com

    Matthew Moss

    _________________________________________________________________________

    TheFirearmBlog.com – Managing Editor
    OvertDefense.com – Managing Editor

    Matt is a British historian specialising in small arms development and military history. He has written several books and for a variety of publications in both the US and UK. He also runs Historical Firearms, a blog that explores the history, development and use of firearms. Matt is also co-founder of The Armourer’s Bench, a video series on historically significant small arms.

    Here on TFB he covers product and current military small arms news.

    Reach Matt at: [email protected]


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