[SHOT 2020] TFB Industry Day At The Range – Colt Python

    Colt Python 2020

    Colt Python 2020

    Colt Python 2020

    Colt Python 2020

    Colt Python 2020

    As we weary TFB staff traveled through the wilds of Industry Day, I wandered towards the sign of the Prancing Pony.  Their one and only ware on display for live fire was the new redesigned Colt Python.  One of Colt’s engineers shed some knowledge on me about the internal workings and manufacturing processes behind this revolver.

    Colt Python 2020

    Colt Python 2020

    When the Python was re-engineered, there was a total internal parts reduction of 12.  The trigger works off of a leaf spring.  The trigger rebound bar works off of the bottom leg of the same spring, as does the hand.  The hammer safety is now a transfer bar instead of a hammer block.  The new trigger pull ranges from 7-9lbs double action and 3-5lbs single action.  The new trigger pull has .2lbs less variation pull to pull than the old Python.

    Colt Python 2020

    Old Python trigger pull measurement

    Colt Python 2020

    New Python DA trigger pull measurement

    All critical parts are made of through hardened bar stock, though some non-critical parts are MIM.  The through hardening is important, as one can run into issues with wear or tuning of case-hardened parts wherein an unhardened layer of metal can be exposed. All the bar stock parts are tumbled to achieve a very smooth finish with no machining marks.  Due to the tumbling, there are not grooves on the rear strap of the frame, unlike the old Python.  The tumbling process would simply round the grooves off.  The top strap is also much more robust, ameliorating the frame stretching issue of the old Python.

    Internal parts fitment is no longer done by hand, but by robots.  To fit the hand precisely to each revolver, a machine takes the measurements, and inputs them into the CNC that makes the hand fit precisely to that frame.  A very modern solution that helps keep the price point down to $1499 MSRP.

    HITS AND HICCUPS

    Colt Python 2020

    Loaded with .38 Special, so one can hold on loosely

    Colt had both the 4.25 inch and 6 inch Pythons available to shoot.  I opted for the 6″, as I was interested in the balance of the longer barrel.  The revolver points very naturally, exactly like an old Python.  The double action pull was very smooth and consistent, though does not “stage” the hammer at all like the old Pythons.  Single action pulls were very crisp, though just a tad heavier than the old Pythons.  Colt said the heavier pull weight was needed to pass modern drop test requirements.  In both modes, targets were simple to hit out to 50 yards.

    Unfortunately, after only 7 rounds of Colt’s National Match .38 Special, I experienced a failure to advance the cylinder.  A few other reviewers have experienced this issue as well.  Colt is aware of the issue (likely a failure of the hand to rebound), and ask that anyone experiencing this issue send their Pythons in for assessment and repair.  This may be a teething issue, but it seems like Colt should have done more due diligence to prevent this issue from occurring to customers in the first place.

    Colt Python 2020

    New Colt Python Front Sight

    For more information, please visit Colt’s Manufacturing.

    Rusty S.

    Having always had a passion for firearms, Rusty S. has had experience in gunsmithing, firearms retail, hunting, competitive shooting, range construction, as an IDPA certified range safety officer and a certified instructor. He has received military, law enforcement, and private training in the use of firearms. He is fortunate enough to have access to class 3 weaponry as well.


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