TFB Review: SIG Sauer Tango6 5-30x56mm FFP MRAD

    sig sauer tango6

    SIG Sauer has been in the game of making quality firearms for a very long time, but only recently have they dove into the arena of optics. They are acquiring a lot of contracts with law enforcement and military groups alike drawing a lot of buzz around their line of electro-optics. I have personally fondled and shot quite a few of their red dots, but none of their riflescopes so I wanted to know what all the fuss was about. So they were kind enough to let me play with their SIG Sauer Tango6 5-30x56mm FFP MRAD. This optic is the very top of their highest tier of scopes so I am grateful for them entrusting a MN boy with dragging one out to the range for repeated days of shooting. Let’s get into this TFB Review and see what the SIG Sauer Tango6 5-30x56mm FFP MRAD is all about!

    nomenclature: Sig Sauer Tango6 5-30x56mm FFP MRAD

    First, we will break down the name of the optic so we all have a basis for what SIG is bringing to the table with this specific model. The SIG Sauer Tango6 series is designed for MSR/AR platforms as well as bolt-action rifles. The “6” designation refers to the magnification range growing by 6x of its starting magnification, for whatever that may be (Ex. 1-6, 3-18, 4-24, 5-30). The 56mm refers to the objective size or front lens where light enters the scope. The “FFP” stands for Front Focal Plane meaning the reticle is in front of the magnification lenses; moreover, when you increase magnification the reticle will grow in size just like the target you are looking at. The acronym “MRAD” is short-hand for milliradian and refers to the adjustment unit of measure for the scope. Typically, optics created with MRAD adjustments are much more fine in their adjustment.

    So let’s read the optic name once more that we will be reviewing today: SIG Sauer Tango6 5-30x56mm FFP MRAD. It is like an alphabet soup for the uninitiated, but all the letters are like a secret code for a characteristic surrounding the scope’s abilities. So if anybody asks if you can speak 2 languages, you can gladly exclaim, Of course! I speak English and optics! Maybe only funny to other shooters, but let’s keep moving along.

    sig sauer tango6

    specifications: sIG Sauer tango6 5-30x56mm ffp mrad

    Being as this is a pretty expensive riflescope, the specs read as being other-worldly. Everything from front-to-back is of the utmost quality that SIG Sauer could pour into an optic. The specifications for the Tango6 can be read below as presented by SIG Sauer:

    • HDX™ Optics Extra-Low Dispersion Glass (LD) combined w/ High Transmittance Glass (HT) provide industry leading Light Transmission & Optical Clarity for any Situation
    • LevelPlex Digital Anti-Cant System utilizes an integrated Digital Level w/ User Selectable Reticle Cant Detection at +/-0.5° or +/-1.0° sensitivity.
    • MOTAC™ (Motion Activated Illumination) powers up when it senses motion & powers down when it does not. Provides for optimum Operational Safety & Enhanced Battery Life
    • Dependable Waterproof (IPX-7 rated for complete immersion up to 1 meter) & Fog-Proof Performance
    • T120 Tactical Turrets w/ 120 Clicks per Rotation (12 MRAD or 30 MOA)
    • LockDown™ Zero System on the TANGO6 features a Resettable Zero, Zero-Stop & is Lockable at any Location

    sig sauer tango6

    The SIG Sauer Tango6 5-30x56mm FFP MRAD has an MSRP of $2,999.99 and is accompanied by the SIG Sauer Electro-Optic Infinite Guarantee. The Infinite Guarantee from SIG Sauer ensures you are always covered with no additional hoops to jump through once you purchase one of their products.

    • Unlimited Lifetime Guarantee
    • Fully Transferable
    • No Warranty Card Required
    • No Receipt Required
    • No Time Limit Applies
    • No Charge

    Warranties for anything are one of those scenarios that it is better to have and not need than need and not have. So hopefully you never need to use it, but it is good peace of mind that SIG Sauer has got your back.

    sig sauer tango6

    mounting: sig sauer tango6 5-30x56mm ffp mrad

    While mounting this bad boy up so I could head out to the range was not a problem some people might be interested in the hardware that was used for testing. The rifle being used was a Bergara HMR Pro 6.5 Creedmoor. This rifle shoots lasers (factory test target of 0.161″) so it was up to the optic and me to see how we could perform together.

    The Picatinny rail used was an EGW (Evolution Gun Works) and the mounts were SIG Sauer’s Alpha 2 – 34mm 20 MOA Scope Mounts (Item #SOA20004). The mounts by Sig Sauer were steel and I appreciate them including the necessary 34mm mounts with the optic for testing because 34mm tube diameters are not very common. All in all, everything pieced together smoothly as one would expect and hope.

    sig sauer tango6

    reticle subtenstions: Sig Sauer Tango6 5-30x56mm FFP MRAD

    Once the rifle and optic were properly married together, the first thing that was tested out at the range was the reticle subtensions. When we look at optics and their reticles in a retail store we make the assumption that if a manufacturer states their subtensions, or the little hashes on a reticle, equal a specific increment like 1 mil, that they do. It would be wonderful if that were true, but unfortunately, it is not true for all scope manufacturers.

    With the SIG Sauer Tango6 5-30x56mm FFP MRAD scope we are testing, SIG Sauer claims that every large or prominent subtension is 1 mil or 10 centimeters at a distance of 100 meters. To check this, I did not have a target with centimeters marked out on it unfortunately so I went straight shadetree gunsmith and duck-taped a ruler to a target at 100 meters. When I maxed out the magnification at 30x and laid the reticle over my duck-taped ruler, every subtension crisply appeared at 10-centimeter increments as advertised.

    sig sauer tango6

    tracking: Sig Sauer Tango6 5-30x56mm FFP MRAD

    The next test to ensure this optic is up to par is to verify it “tracks” correctly. What is meant by this is if you make an adjustment, either windage or elevation, by clicking a fixed amount on your turrets, that actually pans out on paper. You never want to adjust your elevation say 10 mils and then an optic does not act as advertised and only gives you 8 mils of adjustment.

    So to test the tracking, I shot a 3-shot group, adjusted 1 mil, and then shot a second 3-shot group. After wandering down to my target to verify, the scope gave me 10 centimeters (1 mil) of elevation adjustment just like I wanted which is perfect. It passes the test. I can also say over the course of 2 days and shooting roughly 8 hours whenever I made a random 2 mil adjustment here or a 3 mil adjustment there, the scope always responded accordingly.

    parallax: Sig Sauer Tango6 5-30x56mm FFP MRAD

    The next test I put the SIG Sauer Tango6 through was to verify its parallax. The parallax of any scope is a very misunderstood property. Most people tend to believe your parallax knob (if any scope offers one) is there to make your image clear. This is an extremely rudimentary way of expressing what your parallax actually accomplishes.

    The parallax of any scope is meant to get your reticle and the object you are looking at on the same focal plane. When this is achieved, yes, your image will look more clear, but once again that is an overly simplistic explanation for what is going on. Most parallax knobs will have yardage markers to indicate at what revolution point on the knob you should hopefully hit that “honey hole” of reticle and target being on the same focal plane. While the numbers are not always perfect, its a good baseline.

    sig sauer tango6

    Later in my review of this optic’s accuracy, I attempted to hit steel gongs out to 600 yards. When placing the parallax on 500, all of my targets from roughly 400 – 600 yards had good clarity and resolution to make an accurate shot. Moreover, the parallax was very forgiving on the SIG Sauer Tango6 which means less adjustments required when engaging targets at multiple distances.

    accuracy: Sig Sauer Tango6 5-30x56mm FFP MRAD

    The final element of this scope I tested is accuracy because, to be honest, it is the least important. Why? The accuracy is more dependent on the goofball pulling the trigger and less on the quality of the scope. To play devil’s advocate, it can also be said that you can’t hit what you can’t see so the optic does have to be good for the shooter to have a chance at hitting their mark.

    sig sauer tango6

    The ammunition I used for testing the SIG Sauer Tango6 5-30x56mm FFP MRAD was all graciously given to TFB from Federal Premium. So a tremendous thank you to the good folks there for their generosity and quality ammo! This is all of the stuff I had the opportunity to send down range through the Bergara HMR Pro 6.5 Creedmoor with the Tango6 on top:

    sig sauer tango6

    After establishing a confident zero at 100 Yards, I began to shoot three 3-Shot Groups of every flavor of ammo. It was a little workout for the gun, some exercise for the scope, and more patience demanded from the MN boy pulling the trigger. I was very pleased with the groups I was able to accomplish because the Bergara HMR Pro is a tremendously smooth shooting rifle and action. Also, the Tango6 responded to everything I asked of it. I felt very confident in everything I was trying to accomplish at the range. For those that might care, these are groups I was able to get for accuracy’s sake:

    sig sauer tango6

    All of this ammo averaged under 1″ at 100 Yards which is terrific! In every instance, my groups got smaller the longer I shot so there is obvious human error in the beginning groups of every flavor of ammunition, and the optic and rifle far exceed my shooting ability which is really cool in my opinion.

    One final test I did beyond the sheer numbers of accuracy was to shoot at distance. I was able to get out on a farmer’s field local to where I live and attempt to ping steel gongs out to 600 yards in increments of 100 starting at 100 yards. Having done as much shooting as I already had with the SIG Sauer Tango6, I had no problems connecting and making positive hits all the way out to 600 yards. So mission accomplished!

    final thoughts: sig sauer tango6 5-30x56mm ffp mrad

    Overall, I was thoroughly impressed with the SIG Sauer Tango6 5-30x56mm FFP MRAD optic. The reticle subtensions were correct, it tracked well, the parallax was very forgiving, and by all measures, the scope can definitely make you an accurate shooter. One thing I would say is a negative is the weight of the optic and the less common tube diameter of 34mm. This scope is a BEAST in sheer size and weight. Finding rings or mounts for something that is 34mm might be more difficult for an average Joe at a random gun shop, but if you hit up SIG Sauer’s website they can help you out in that department.

    While manipulating the optic, the turrets were crisp and definitive in their adjustments, and the zero-stop turrets were easy to set and use. From start to finish the Sig Sauer Tango6 was truly a great scope to shoot, use and handle. If anyone is contemplating topping off a rifle with one, I would not hesitate to pull the trigger and buy one.

    sig sauer tango6

    Once again, the full MSRP for the Sig Sauer Tango6 5-30x56mm FFP MRAD is $2,999. In closing, I want to strongly say THANK YOU to Bergara for the use of their HMR Pro 6.5 Creedmoor… THANK YOU to Federal Premium for their assortment of ammunition… and THANK YOU to SIG Sauer as well for letting TFB, and myself, fondle and play with one of the nicest optics they offer.

    For all of our readers out there, what did you think? Is that the type of accuracy you expected out of a Bergara with the SIG Sauer Tango6 on top? Have you personally shot or own one of the Tango6 riflescopes? Let us know all of your Comments below! We always appreciate your feedback.

    sig sauer tango6

    sig sauer tango6

    sig sauer tango6

    sig sauer tango6

    sig sauer tango6

    sig sauer tango6

    sig sauer tango6


    We are committed to finding, researching, and recommending the best products. We earn commissions from purchases you make using the retail links in our product reviews. Learn more about how this works.

    Editor | AllOutdoor.com
    Writer | OutdoorHub.com
    Writer | TheArmoryLife.com
    Writer | Tyrant Designs CNC Blog
    Guest Writer | Boyds Gunstocks Blog
    Guest Writer | NRA “Shooting Sports USA”
    Guest Writer | Sierra Bullets Blog
    Smith & Wesson Certified Armorer
    Glock Certified Armorer
    Firefighter/EMS
    Instagram: strength_in_arms


    Advertisement