TFB Review: Tyrant Designs T-Comp Glock 9mm Muzzle Brake

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    One accessory I have never played with on one of my firearms is a pistol muzzle brake. I had always wondered are they kind of for looks only or do they actually serve a valuable purpose without ever knowing the true answer. Well, Tyrant Designs recently reached out to TFB seeing as they debuted their NEW Glock T-Comp Muzzle Brake. This gave me the perfect opportunity to play with their NEW T-Comp and answer some of my own questions surrounding muzzle brakes for handguns. So let’s take an in-depth look at Tyrant Designs’ NEW Glock T-Comp Muzzle Brake for 9mm pistols (1/2″ x 28 T.P.I. Compatible).

    specifications: tyrant designs Glock T-Comp Muzzle Brake for 9mm

    The specifications for this product are fairly straight forward. If you have a threaded barrel for a 9mm pistol, and it features a standard ½” x 28 thread, you are good to go. In an extremely condensed explanation, you will simply put the muzzle brake on and thread a bushing through it to lock it in place. A short overview is given by Tyrant Designs which can be read below:

    • Works on Standard  ½” x 28 TPI Threaded Barrels
    • Gen3 – Gen5 Compatible (Gen5 has Special Bull-Nose Fitment)
    • Functions w/ Most Grain Weight Ammo
    • Glock 19 w/ T-Comp Fits G34 Holster
    • Installs using Supplied 16mm Wrench

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    For the purposes of this review, Tyrant Designs gave me a variety pack of sorts. I got multiple colored bushings and an abundance of rubber O-rings (which come in 2 different sizes). So if you happen to have a black threaded barrel or gold or silver or possibly something else, hopefully, one of those 3 colored bushings trips your trigger. Being as I have a gold threaded barrel from Faxon Firearms, I opted for the gold bushing for this review.

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    Installation: tyrant designs Glock T-Comp Muzzle Brake for 9mm

    Like I alluded to earlier, the installation of this product is very easy and straight-forward. The biggest thing to remember when installing the Glock T-Comp Muzzle Brake is to utilize the correct O-rings when necessary. The thicker of the two O-rings will end up on your threaded barrel while the thinner of the two O-rings goes on the bushing.

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    Then, with the 16mm wrench that is provided, you simply tighten up the bushing and make sure the T-Comp stays square or aligned with the slide. When you are actively shooting this is important because, during the moment of inertia or the period where the slide reciprocates during recoil, the recoil spring of your pistol may temporarily enter a pocket in the rear of the T-Comp. If the T-Comp is not aligned and is all kittywampus (high technical firearm jargon), then the slide may not reciprocate properly.

    For a more elaborate explanation of installing the T-Comp correctly, Tyrant Designs has this YouTube video for all of us which can be watched below:

    Once you have the T-Comp snugged up and squared up, you are ready to hit the range! Like I mentioned earlier, I found it easy and intuitive to install this accessory. The only other piece I will note is the bushing does screw on tight. Not let’s go grab some power tools tight, but it is very snug because you are squishing and compressing two rubber O-rings to ensure the T-Comp does not go anywhere while you are shooting. So eat some Wheaties or throw a lil’ elbow grease into your arms when you tighten up the bushing on the T-Comp.

    range time: tyrant designs Glock T-Comp Muzzle Brake for 9mm

    Once I headed to the range, I not only wanted to test the Tyrant Designs Glock T-Comp Muzzle Brake, but I wanted to put myself in the correct frame of mind. In order to do that, I shot my Glock three different ways to cleanse my perspective and hopefully get a better sense of what the T-Comp did/didn’t do.

    • Suppressed: Silencerco Hybrid 46 silencer
    • Unsuppressed: Faxon Firearms G17 threaded barrel (no muzzle attachments)
    • Muzzle Brake: Tyrant Designs Glock T-Comp Muzzle Brake

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    By doing this, I figured I would get a better sense for what normal recoil is, how it felt with the muzzle brake, and how it compared to a silencer. A second marker which helped me assess recoil was my Trijicon RMR, and how well I could see my shot impact a target and if the red dot stayed within my line of sight or rose out of it momentarily.

    While shooting unsuppressed or with just the threaded barrel alone, the recoil is exactly what I expected. Most of us know 9mm has hardly any recoil in a full-frame pistol, but it does have enough to elevate my red dot out of my line of sight for a temporary moment before my grip returns it back to where I was aiming.

    The next type of shooting I did was suppressed with my Silencerco Hybrid 46 silencer. While shooting suppressed, there was little to no muzzle rise, obviously much quieter, and my Trijicon RMR red dot lifted up so minimally from recoil that I could always see it on target.

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    Finally, I got down to the real business of why I was attending the range this day. I re-installed the Glock T-Comp after having installed it multiple times at home and fondling it on my workbench. My first shot almost startled me in a pleasant way. The recoil (or lack thereof) was almost identical to my silencer. Very negligible recoil and I could maintain the sight picture of my Trijicon RMR the whole time.

    After the 1st shot jitters were over so to speak, I began dumping mags through it to see if it would loosen or any problems would occur. Not surprisingly, it worked flawlessly. I burned through roughly 200 rounds of ammo with some being 115 Grain and others 124 Grain. Other than getting really dirty from shooting cheap ammo the T-Comp worked as designed and exceeded my expectations since I had never shot a pistol muzzle brake before.

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    One other thing I recorded, I did make sure to document my 1st 5 shots through the T-Comp. Other than one flyer from the goofball holding the Glock, the T-Comp did not inhibit the accuracy whatsoever. It is not something I expected, but I wanted to check just to be sure. From a distance of 10 yards and shooting just regular 115 Grain FMJ (Full-Metal Jacket) it grouped really well. People who are better shooters than me could probably make that “X” disappear pretty easily.

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    Conclusion: tyrant designs Glock T-Comp Muzzle Brake for 9mm

    After having shot my 1st pistol muzzle brake and the Tyrant Designs T-Comp, I have a newfound appreciation for them. The T-Comp was very easy to install, had minimal parts, locked up tight, did not inhibit accuracy, and did a terrific job mitigating recoil. All in all, its performance was stellar!

    Some other things I noticed is the T-Comp is machined or shaped in a way that my Streamlight TLR-1 still fit with no rubbing at all. There was a small amount of space between them where they worked in perfect unison. Also, for the T-Comp being a muzzle brake, I did not notice any increase in noise while shooting like you would expect. I only have anecdotal evidence to back this up, but it did not sound any louder than shooting my bare bones Glock with no attachments.

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    Finally, let’s discuss the elephant in the room shall we… the Tyrant Designs Glock T-Comp is hella cool! Your friends might be haters when they see it, but once they shoot it they will be jealous. To spark that jealousy, the Tyrant Designs Glock T-Comp sells for $89.95 on their website.

    Some other things to note about the T-Comp are no set screws or loctite are required. Its appearance is nearly OEM, but with that typical Tyrant Designs unique flare. Also, it functioned really well on my pretty jazzed up Glock with a decent assortment of ammo.

    So for all of our TFB readers out there, do you personally own a pistol muzzle brake? Have you entertained buying one? Shot one previously? Is this one you would entertain adding to one of your firearms? Let us know your thoughts in the Comments below! We always appreciate your feedback.

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    Editor | AllOutdoor.com
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