Review: Distance Reduction Indicator by David Tubb

    Yet another “Why didn’t I think of that?” item, the Distance Reduction Indicator (DRi) by David Tubb is a simple yet effective device for helping you make adjustments to distance for high-angle precision shooting.

    I recently took a Precision Long Range 2 (High Angled Shooting) at the NRA Whittington Center, as a follow on to my class earlier this year (be on the look out for the write up on that class). One of the other students had this nifty little device that he let me borrow for the duration of the course (thanks, Matt!)

    Construction

    The DRi is a compact and rugged hunk of metal. It is low-profile and “constructed to withstand the rigors of field use”. It fits any standard Picatinny rail, and is level-adjustable over a 100 MOA range so you can accommodate long-range-style scope mounts. The markings are laser engraved along the side of the dial (as well as the front) meaning the data is also readable from the spotter’s perspective.

    Tubbs DRi from the side.

    Tubbs DRi from the side.

    Observations

    It is a dead simple device to use once you understand how to interpolate the data. The markings on the body immediately give you the reductions for 600 and 1200 yards. For everything else you must do some quick “in you head” math (which is much faster than figuring out the angle and doing the cosine math). They produced a video that explains it:

    I used a protractor, my Leupold RX-1200i range finder, and Theodolite (an app on my iPhone; yes, I’m one of “those”) to get the angles (the class was all about Angled Precision Long Range). I then did the cosine math by hand (you know, old school pencil and paper), and used my Kestrel 5700 (with Applied Ballistics). What I found is that the estimations from the Distance Reduction Indicator were all within a few yards of the mathematical solutions from the other methods. Which in precision long range, at the distances we were shooting, was good ’nuff.

    Super simple to operate. No batteries to die. No papers to blow away...

    Super simple to operate. No batteries to die. No papers to blow away…

    The reductions given were appropriate.

    Conclusions

    If you are into precision shooting, and you’d like to eliminate the need for using cosine calculations to correct for angles, this is definitely worth the $120.

    It is super rugged and simple to use. Glance over at the Distance Reduction Indicator, find the distance marker close to your target distance, and subtract off the value. Done. Of course you still have to know your holds, but at least the angle math is handled for you.

    You can find out more information at the website:

    http://www.davidtubb.com/distance%20reduction%20indicator,%20dri,%20angle%20cosine%20firing%20solution

    Tom is a former Navy Corpsman that spent some time bumbling around the deserts of Iraq with a Marine Recon unit, kicking in tent flaps and harassing sheep. Prior to that he was a paramedic somewhere in DFW, also doing some Executive Protection work between shifts. Now that those exciting days are behind him, he teaches wilderness medicine and writes for a number of publications, including The Prepared, a site devoted to self-preparedness. He hopes that his posts will help you find solid gear that will survive whatever you can throw at it–he is known (in certain circles) for his curse…ahem, ability…to find the breaking point of anything.

    You can reach him at tom.r AT thefirearmblog.com


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