Streamlight Helps Light the Pathway to Stop Diabetes

    It is nice to see companies donating profits and bringing awareness to causes.  Streamlight is promoting a new “Light for a Cause”, this time focused at Diabetes.

    November is American Diabetes Month®, and Streamlight® Inc., a leading provider of high-performance lighting equipment, is doing its part to shine a light on this serious health problem through sales of a specially marked Red Nano Light®. A portion of sales proceeds of the miniature keychain light benefit the American Diabetes Association® Research Foundation.

    Streamlight donates $1.00 to the organization for each of these Nano Lights sold, as part of the company’s Lights For A Cause program.

    “This Red Nano Light is Streamlight’s way of helping to educate people about this critical health issue that affects so many of us,” said Streamlight President and Chief Executive Officer Ray Sharrah. “We’re proud to use our Lights For A Cause program to benefit the American Diabetes Association Research Foundation as it seeks to find a cure for this disease, and to improve the lives of all people affected by it.”

    The 10 lumen keychain light measures 1.47 inches in length and weighs 0.36 oz. It is fabricated from machined aircraft aluminum, with a run time of up to eight hours, and is powered by four IEC-LR41 coin cells.

    Activation is via a rotating on/off head switch, and it has a non-rotating snap hook for one-handed operation when attached to a keychain, and an FOB that features the Stop Diabetes® logo.

    The MSRP is $12.48. The light comes with Streamlight’s Limited Lifetime Warranty.  You can find more information at: http://www.streamlight.com/it-it/product/product.html?pid=302 though strangely I could not find a way to buy one directly–I’m guessing they are going to be available at other retailers.

    Tom is a former Navy Corpsman that spent some time bumbling around the deserts of Iraq with a Marine Recon unit, kicking in tent flaps and harassing sheep. Prior to that he was a paramedic somewhere in DFW, also doing some Executive Protection work between shifts. Now that those exciting days are behind him, he teaches wilderness medicine and writes for a number of publications, including The Prepared, a site devoted to self-preparedness. He hopes that his posts will help you find solid gear that will survive whatever you can throw at it–he is known (in certain circles) for his curse…ahem, ability…to find the breaking point of anything.

    You can reach him at tom.r AT thefirearmblog.com


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