AR sentry gun contraption

Miles
by Miles

A group called NYC CN C has put together a video on creating a sentry contraption jig that assisted with a computer program, can automatically detect a target, then the shooter uses a string to pull the trigger. They say that everything can be made for $150, and it seems to work pretty well at the 5 meters they are shooting at with a .22 AR15. The actual mechanics of the rotors, and electrics is so far beyond my poor means to comprehend, so maybe some of our more knowledgeable readers can let us in how just how those work.

Of course, this contraption has no tactical or protective use whatsoever, never mind the liability involved if used in some kind of role akin to a “sentry”. But that doesn’t take away from the novelty of it, it is pretty neat!

They are using a string because of the various safeties involved and not wanting to get mixed up in liabilities of that.

Miles
Miles

Infantry Marine, based in the Midwest. Specifically interested in small arms history, development, and usage within the MENA region and Central Asia. To that end, I run Silah Report, a website dedicated to analyzing small arms history and news out of MENA and Central Asia.Please feel free to get in touch with me about something I can add to a post, an error I've made, or if you just want to talk guns. I can be reached at miles@tfb.tv

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  • Southpaw89 Southpaw89 on Oct 12, 2015

    Part of me says cool! And part of me says add some facial recognition software and an automated trigger and you have a potentially very dangerous piece of equipment, or something that could be used to keep squirrels off the bird feeder.

  • Alex Agius Alex Agius on Oct 13, 2015

    "They are using a string because of the various safeties involved and not wanting to get mixed up in liabilities of that." - The actual reason they are using a string is the ATF would consider it a machine gun otherwise.

    • Josh Josh on Oct 14, 2015

      @Alex Agius And it would be literally such, I suppose..... Not that that makes the legal tomfoolery of that any less absurd.

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