Top 5 Reasons To Consider A Red Dot On Your Pistol

Ever wondered if there was a reason for putting a red dot sight onto a pistol? In this TFBTV episode, Patrick talks about his top 5 reasons for considering a red dot on your pistol. The fact is, the timer doesn’t lie and every time Patrick has pitted irons against a red dot, the red dot has come out on top. But beyond being faster than irons, what other reasons could he have that make a red dot flat out better than irons?

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Transcript ….

[coming soon]



Patrick R

Patrick is a Senior Writer for The Firearm Blog and TFBTV Host. He likes guns and has liked shooting guns for as long as he can remember. You can follow Patrick on Instagram @tfbpatrick, Facebook, or contact him by email at TFBpatrick@gmail.com.

The above post is my opinion and does not reflect the views of any company or organization.


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  • ClintTorres

    I’ve only recently shot a pistol with a red dot (Ruger Mk III) and I’m a believer. Haven’t ventured into centerfire pistol w/ red dot yet but that’s in the works…muahahaha.

    It’s especially good for my older eyes. Front-sight focus is hard with presbyopia…plus I think I prefer target-focus.

    • pun&gun

      I target-focus, too. Got into shooting via sporting clays, so I never had to unlearn front-sight focus. Looking at the target is just objectively better; faster, more intuitive, easier on the eyes, and no blurry or double vision making your target ambiguous.

  • Ken

    Allow me a couple of quibbles please. At reason #2 you mentioned centering the dot. It is not necessary to center the dot in the window. This is especially helpful for really, really quick shots. At reason #5, you seem to imply that you’re focusing on the dot. If that’s the case, you’re doing it wrong. The real advantage of the RDS over irons is that you can focus on the target with both eyes open, and the dot is superimposed on the target. In your “bonus” reason, you talk about how the red dot clears the top of the suppressor. Actually, if you’re doing it correctly (both eyes open) it doesn’t matter if the dot clears the top of the suppressor because you’re actually “looking through” the suppressor. Dominant eye sees the dot, non-dominant eye sees the target, brain puts the two together.

    • Indianasteve

      Then that is why when I shoot with a red dot, both eyes open, the dot actually appears not to be in the frame or ring of the sight, but rather outside the sight. I don’t know if I worded that very well.

      • Jack

        Are you looking thru the sight with your dominant eye?

        • Indianasteve

          No. I am right hand dominate and left eye. It is really hard to look thru a sight with my left eye without shutting the right.

          • Jack

            I believe the cross dominance may be your issue.

          • Indianasteve

            It feels a little awkward but the dot is on the target.

          • Ken

            And therein lies the beauty of using both eyes. Regardless of dominance, the dot is in front of one eye and the target in front of the other. Brain puts them together, and, viola!

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      Correct on all points. You don’t have to center the dot, I misspoke. I meant to say find the dot in the window. Again, mispoke with the “focus on the read dot” line, a few seconds prior to saying that I did say “with a red dot, you’re kinda looking past it, you’re focusing on something beyond the gun.”

      • FightFireJay

        Contrary to manufacturer statements, red dots are not parallax free. So if you want to shoot accurately at distance or shoot small groups, then you need consistent dot placement in the window.

        I suggest placing it on top of the front sight, if you have co-witness sights.

        • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

          For precision, yes. I need to test it, but I suspect the effect on point of impact that the RMR parallax has is probably reasonably minimal.

          • It’s less than most shooters margin of error by far, assuming you are shooting less than 50 yards with your pistol and not using the 1MOA dot aiming at 2in targets.

        • Montana Gun Nut

          Whenever you have a transparent medium (i.e. lens of any kind) between you and what you’re looking at, you’ll have some kind of prismatic effect. When the medium shifts off perfect perpendicularity, there will be parallax shift…always.

          So while you don’t “have” to center the dot, you will get the absolute best precision (assuming a correct zero was applied to the red-dot), allowable.

          If you’re going for absolute speed, training correct muscle memory via instinctive point shooting will be fastest of all. This requires the most time spent repeating the same correct motion. This goes back to the likes of Bob Munden (who was faster than a rattlesnake strike), and also was so stupidly accurate, he never used his sights, and didn’t need them.

          That being said, most of us don’t have the time and money to spend day in and day out shooting for hours and hours on end. Unfortunately.

          I prefer the happy medium. Fire 2-3 rounds while punching out, aiming instinctively until you’re lined up with proper sight picture. Liberal application during drills does wonders. Shoot steel for fastest feedback effect.

  • EdgyTrumpet

    Next article: Having a Red Dot On Your Pistol Is Stupid!

    • Major Tom

      That seems to be the trend.

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      Nah.

  • Royce Williams

    If you’re utilizing red dot sights on a pistol for use in competitive target or hunting scenarios they work as advertised. If you’re utilizing red dots sights on a defensive handgun under the assumption that you’ll be able to instantly pick up the red dot with a sight mounted on a pistol like you can with a red dot sight mounted on a rifle you’re mistaken and will be disappointed when you realize that it takes longer for average and even above average shooters to pick up a red dot than it does to pick up iron sights. The truth is that in defensive shooting applications at real world distances of 3 to 10 yds, most shooters can egage a target much quicker with a good set of iron sights on a handgun than they can with a red dot.

    • ClintTorres

      This all may be true but, for me, it seems much more “natural” to focus on the target. Shooting with a RDS has made pistol shooting(which I was, formerly, not so fond of) much more fun for me.

      • Royce Williams

        Nothing wrong with red dots, but the way to quickly and instantly acquire the dot on a pistol mounted sight is to first find your iron sights. No doubt that red dot sights improve speed and accuracy for skilled top rated shooters who spend many hours and dollars mastering their use, but as I said before, for the average and even above average shooter it takes longer to find the red dot on a pistol mounted sight and that delay is significant if you’re engaging a threat at close range.

        • ClintTorres

          You’re probably correct but my ultimate goal has not been speed but accuracy. I suppose it would matter more for me if fractions of a second were important to the type of shooting I was engaged in. I’m must trying to hit spinners (small ones) at the range.

        • Ken

          When it comes down to it, ultimately, for defensive shooting at 3 – 7 yard ranges, the “average” shooter won’t be doing either. They’ll be point shooting.

          • Royce Williams

            Nice how you ignored “above average” in my comment. While beginner and novice shooters might be incapable of picking up their front sight to point and shoot, most average and nearly all above average shooters can, but then I suppose that’s something a beginner or novice wouldn’t know.

          • Ken

            Nope, didn’t ignore it. Just didn’t address it. Average and above average are two different sets of folks. As a LE and non-LE trainer since 1989, I’m confident in my assessment. I would characterize the vast majority of LE shooters as “average”. Most LE’s don’t come to the range on their own time. They do just enough to “qualify” or get through the training session. They don’t stay a bit after everyone else has gone, even if they were given free ammo. They’re “shooters” because they have to be. I believe that many, if not most, non-LE shooters are “gun owners” rather than shooters. They’re the ones that buy a gun, take the class to get their CC permit/license/whatever (if even that), then put it in the drawer on their nightstand or under the seat/in the glovebox of their car, and MAYBE go out once in a blue moon and shoot at a few cans in the woods with a couple of buddies. I would also characterize these folks as “average”. In either case, given the opportunity to deploy their firearm in a close-in defensive situation will not result in the use of their sights. And having seen many force-on-force training situations with LE’s, again, I am confident in my assessment. (man, did that get off topic, or what?)

        • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

          Again, this is complete BS. Once you practice, finding the dot is no different than finding your front sight.

          • I completely agree. It is hard to take anyone seriously when they make the claim about the difficulty of finding the dot, because it is just NOT an issue. My wife literally had zero trouble with it her very first time ever shooting any gun ever in her entire life. She was leaning back, half wincing, scared to pull the trigger, and still saw the dot without issue.

          • Royce Williams

            Spoken like someone pretending to have honestly compared iron sights vs red dots at 3-10 yds. You’re embarrassingly full of $#it.

          • DonDrapersAcidTrip

            Spoken like someone who can’t afford a red dot

      • HerbertK

        Then put a laser on your pistol. Red dot at arm’s length has less than 2 degree field of view, laser has unlimited “field of view.” Shooting from awkward positions and around cover gives the laser the advantage. You’re target focused with the laser and have an easier time picking up the dot.

        • ClintTorres

          I don’t shoot those spinner targets at arms length. If that were the case, I’d just flick them with my finger.

          J/K, I suppose it would be an option but not one that I’ve tried…yet. I mostly target shoot not really defensive shooting.

        • Stuki Moi

          Lasers break down catastrophically on small targets against a distant background. Just imagine using one for skeet shooting…..

        • Tacbear

          BINGO…another winner! I am a trainer (LEO SWAT/PATROL and Civilian CCW) and I have tried every sighting aid I can get my hands on and for fast close in self defense I have a Light/Laser on all my carry guns….also TruGlo TFO sights!

          • john huscio

            The surefire xc1 is the only light id even consider on a carry gun…..everything else adds alot more size and weight and calls for custom holsters….

        • Bradley

          You don’t have a field of view with a red dot with both eyes open. You can cover the front glass and still see your entire target and the dot.

    • Nonsense, the reddot is faster and easier than iron sights in every single metric in every situation. Drawbacks to an RDS are the price, holster limitations, battery operated, can turn off/needs to be turned on, and cutting needed for the install.

      • Royce Williams

        Bull$#it

        • What a thoughtful reply. No wonder you have so much trouble finding a reddot.

        • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

          LOL. Spoken like someone with little to no experience with dots on pistols.

          • Royce Williams

            Actually I’ve got quite a bit experience and obviously a lot more than you which is why I know when red dot sights on a pistol are advantageous and when they’re not. Unlike you I have no motive to mislead gullible firearms novice into buying a red dot sight with the expectation that they’re going to be able to instantly acquire the dot on a pistol like they can with a rifle because they can’t. The majority of shooters are better off spending their money on practice ammo because red dots sights are not advantageous in most real world defensive handgun applications.

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            Literally nothing you have said speaks of someone who has any real range time with a MRDS equipped pistol. I don’t know what motive I have in trying to present an option to shooters. It isn’t like I get some royalty payment.

            It takes practice, I say that in the video. There is no such thing as buying skill.

          • Royce Williams

            Repeating it over and over doesn’t make it true, you’re full of $#it if you’ve convinced yourself red dots work better or provide any real world advantage over iron sights sights on handguns for most shooters at 10 yds and closer.

      • Jack

        In my experience (I won’t qualify that because it’s the internet and it’s a waste of time) a red dot didn’t help with speed or accuracy within 15yds. Past that, depending on target size, it tends to be more accurate because the dot is covering up significantly less of the target than irons. Your drawbacks are mitigated with a dual illum RMR. Several options for pre cut slides out there. I’ve had no problem finding holsters and in several cases a slight modification to a non compatible holster, quickly makes it compatible.

        • I agree with all you said. I just don’t think iron sights are significantly easier/better for a self defense weapon like claimed above. Especially considering you can easily co-witness. 20 yards+ 4in steel is easier all day with RDS.

        • Past 15 yards it makes a world of difference, which is a worthwhile advantage imo.

      • john huscio

        Forgot the most important drawback. RDS adds size and weight to a pistol.

        • A red dot weighs nothing. It’s quite easy to remove enough steel in the slide to compensate for what little weight a red dot might add.

    • ActionPhysicalMan

      This is not true for those of us with close focus problems. Also when I push my gun out, the dot is always there – I don’t have to find it. The technique is called lots of practice;-)

      • Patrick

        Totally agree. With iron sights, I have to wear reading glasses to get a clean sight picture. With a red dot, my eyes focus on the target and the dot is clear. I frankly wouldn’t want to engage a defensive situation having to wear reading glasses.

    • Tacbear

      BINGO….WE HAVE A WINNER!

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      That isn’t even kind of true. If you practice with a red dot, you will ALWAYS be faster once you are used to presenting a pistol with a dot.

      • Royce Williams

        Bull$#it

  • Mitch

    Keeping your head lower serves a very real purpose, Ace. I don’t want my head popped up like a curious prairie dog in the middle of a gunfight. I guess I’m a “tactical timmy”, after all.

    • Your head position doesn’t need to change even an inch.

      • Stuki Moi

        But when shooting a Glock, it CAN change. So, instead of running around looking like an over aggro Glock shooter, you can look suave like a Sig’er.

        And as we all know, in a life and death situation, looking suave is what counts…….

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      Heads up shooting = more visual information

      Why would you not want more visual information? I am not suggesting you not take cover, just that more visual information is better.

    • Bradley

      You’re concerned about your head being 1/4″ higher?

  • Wolfgar

    You are correct about RDS Patrick but you forgot one of the best advantages of using a RDS, “night shooting”. RDS are vastly superior to night sights during low light shooting situations, with or without the use of a light.

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      I did forget to talk about that one. Whoops. I need to do a night shooting video sometime.

  • Hellbilly

    Pistol-mounted red dots aren’t for everyone, unfortunately. I tried a red dot on my Glock 40 (model 40, 10mm long slide) and hated it. I was faster with standard night sights than I was with the red dot. Where I noticed it shine, however, was longer-distance shooting on a rest. The red dot found a new home on my Bushmaster M17S rifle and I am happy again.

    Moral of the story: Try a buddy’s pistol with a red dot set-up before you spend big bucks on one for yourself.

    • Cymond

      Did you have cowitnessing iron sights? From what I’ve read, that’s the key to getting on target rapidly.

      • Hellbilly

        I tried it with and without co-witnessing sights. The co-witnessing sights did help and then I thought to myself, “If I’m still relying on the irons why should I even bother with the red dot?” and off it came.

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      You should probably practice a whole lot more before dismissing it. Dry fire presentations are your friend.

      • Hellbilly

        I did. I wanted to like it. I like red dots on long guns. When it comes to pistols, I’m just so used to focusing on that front sight while drawing after training for years to do just that and I had to readjust my focus to “find” the dot. Then I installed co-witnessing sights – it helped greatly but then I had a pistol with awkwardly massive iron sights. Then I thought to myself: Why would I refocus my training on one RDS-equipped pistol (that is not an every day defensive carry gun) when all my other pistols have iron sights that I already quickly and accurately utilize?

        Hence, what works great for one person may not for another.

        • Royce Williams

          Your evaluation of red dot vs iron sights for practical use on a defensive handgun in real world scenarios is what anyone else who has done an honest comparison of both has found as well. The hard headed BS comments from Patrick on this topic plus a lame ballistics testing TFB article earlier today by another TFB bozo has caused me to arrive at the disappointing conclusion that some of the TFB writers are just as full of $#it as the bunch from TTAG.

  • AZgunner

    But what happens when someone knowledgeable and competent does the same test?

    • They will come to the conclusion that are some situations where red dots excel, others they are average in, and some they suck it. Just like iron sights.

  • Nick G Man

    Nope. If you have to trust your life to your pistol, I wouldn’t run a RDS. You know what doesn’t run out of batteries? Irons. You know what doesn’t break when you drop it? Irons. You know what doesn’t need to be turned on to use? Irons. RDS also gets in the way of your Irons, so when you skin your gat and find that, “Awww Geez! It’s not on/out of batteries/something isn’t working!”, guess what is effectively covering up your irons? Your RDS.

    With the Glock MOS adapter plate I’ve found that it’ll come lose. And your RDS on top of that adapter plate will also come lose too. Now, you may catch these issues and fix them, which is good, but it is just another possible point of failure in my opinion. Can you keep that sight turned on indefinitely, or are you always going to remember to turn it on? No. Another possible failure. Its a good idea, but with a RDS you’re injecting far too many points of possible failure. If you suck hard with a pistol the RDS will make you much better. If you’re already good, it’s a waste of time.

    • It’s called “co-witness”. There, all your silly what-ifs have been fixed.

      • Nick G Man

        Co witness what? If your red dot sight blocks your irons then you’ve become dependent on that as your only sight now. Why would you want to introduce so many points of failure into the sole method of accurately aiming your pistol. Silly what ifs, sure. Cause nobody has ever had a battery die on them, or a sight come lose without them noticing before.

        • Cactus Air Force

          Many pistol mounted optics are used with supressor high sights that allow you to use both your irons and your red dot, similar to a true cowitness rifle optic and irons combo. With true cowitness pistol irons and red dots, there shouldn’t be any reliability issues. You will always have a sight, but your preferred sight is the red dot, and many people use the rear iron sight to pick up the more precise dot.

        • So the entire armed forces should go back to iron sights as to not introduce extra points of failure? Makes no sense.

          • Stuki Moi

            The pros vs cons are tilted much, much, muchmuchmuch further in favor of the former, at rifle ranges than at defensive pistol ones. While the sights themselves are, again, much more proven for rifles.

            Not saying they can’t make sense on a pistol. Just that whatever sense they make, is much less clear cut.

            Has any “armed force”, or even significant sized police department, standardized on pistol Red Dot’s yet?

          • I agree, the red dot sight is obviously a bigger advantage on a carbine. However, even subguns and CQC carbines use RDS, talking similar ranges. And no, carbine RDS are not more proven, they are literally the same sights the pistols use, think Trijicon RMR and Aimpoint Nano for example.

          • Nick G Man

            In a combat environment if you have to pull your pistol, you have the rest of your life to do so. Something has gone wrong and you’re in a bad place if you have to go to your secondary. No way I’m going to introduce so many potential issues with my last chance, all to shoot what? 10 meters? There is an easier solution. Don’t suck with a pistol.

            If my red dot runs out of battery with a rifle I can get behind cover and change a battery. If it runs out while in a house, I can go to my pistol. If I need my pistol and its not working, I’m F’d. For mall ninjas, sure go nuts with a red dot on your pistol. If I had to trust my life to it? Nah.

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            Jesus. You have back up iron sights Grandpa. If the dot is down, it isn’t the end of the world. Shooters that have far more experience shooting people like CAG (Delta Force) have fully embraced the MRDS on a pistol. You really shouldn’t talk about something that you know nothing about.

          • Porty1119

            “You really shouldn’t talk about something that you know nothing about”

            Funny, I’d give the same advice to TFB’s writers.

          • retfed

            “Jesus. You have [backup] iron sights [,] Grandpa.”
            I don’t know enough about the subject to have an opinion one way or the other, but you just lost me. Try not to talk down to your customers.

          • Patrick Reginald

            Lol you cry.

          • Stop saying you wouldn’t trust your life to a pistol mounted RDS, you can have both sights!!

        • iksnilol

          Never experienced that. Then again, I do buy quality stuff.

        • Dear goodness, the RDS doesn’t need to block your irons what-so-ever, you can use both.

      • nonobaddog

        Even when you have a red dot that allows the iron sights to co-witness the red dot blocks a good chunk of visibility downrange. Not a big deal for slow target shooting but becomes an issue in fast shooting and defensive situations. In effect it reduces the usability of the iron sights even if it doesn’t block them.

        • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

          No, it really doesn’t.

        • It doesn’t block ANYTHING downrange…unless you have no idea how to properly use a RDS…both eyes open, focus on target not the dot.

    • iksnilol

      Many red dots have auto on/off motion sensors. Whilst others are always on due to being tritium illuminated.

      Also, irons do break/bend. Saying anything else is a lie.

    • ActionPhysicalMan

      If you simply replace the batteries every six months or so they will never be dead when you need them. I have dropped my Deltapoint 2 twice on hard surfaces and had no ill effect other than a scratch on the gun. I added and extra spiral pin to my mount and it had never lost zero since. If you drop your gun at the beginning of a gunfight you are probably screwed anyway. The likelihood of the things you are talking about are ridiculously low. Do you also drive a carburated so that it runs after an EMP strike?

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      You probably shouldn’t give advice. You obviously have little experience, if any, with MRDS.

      – Change the battery once a year on a quality optic – battery isn’t a problem anymore.
      – Use a quality red dot – A Trijicon RMR or Deltapoint Pro isn’t going to break when you drop it. In fact, you have a better chance of bending your sights than breaking a red dot.
      – You don’t turn a quality red dot off. They are always on.
      – Back up irons co witness with a dot – it has a window in the middle
      – MOS plates stay put if you install them properly as do the dots

      • pun&gun

        The trick with the MOS plates is using proper screws. The initial issue reports largely came from people using too-short screws that didn’t have enough hold on the slide.

    • Bradley

      You don’t turn a red dot off, and it doesn’t just die at random. I’ve never had to turn my aimpoint off. With three years of battery life I change it once a year. It’s also not any easier to break than iron sights. Probably a lot harder.

  • ActionPhysicalMan

    My pistol has had a red dot longer than yours. I don’t need to put one on it.

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      It isn’t intended to be edgy, but to offer information to someone who hasn’t tried red dots on pistols.

      • ActionPhysicalMan

        I should have used the word “timely” but was in fact changing the comment from something more critical. I suppose that it is that you write as if you don’t understand that a large portion of TFB readers have more experience and knowledge than you do. I almost expect you to write “the four rules of firearm safety that you need to learn” and then go on like it was new information to everyone. You also tend to write things that have already been covered endlessly elsewhere just as the issue of red dots on pistols has. It is like we are watching you learn about guns – you being the Westley Crusher of TFB. Of course, I should concentrate on the undeniable fact that you are getting useful information to people new to guns and just stick the other writers on TFB. I am negligent in this for sure. Grumpy people gotta grump.

        • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

          I am well aware that there are some readers that are far more knowledgeable than I am. What some of you readers don’t seem to understand is that we get assignments, some of them like the top 5 videos we don’t like. You also don’t seem to understand that these videos get the bulk of their views from the YouTube audience, not TFB readers.

          While TFB readers may be knowledgeable overall, the YouTube audience is far different. We tend to get newer shooters much more regularly

  • GaryOlson

    Some 12% of the population has Deuteranopia: red-green blindness. The red dot does not function normally; if they made green that would be a problem also. Therefore, a red dot is not a consideration.
    I am waiting for blue or purple or yellow or any color except red or green.

    • Jack

      Amber? Trijicon has offered one for awhile.

    • BattleshipGrey

      So for those that have red/green blindness, is it literally not visible to them at all, or do they just see a muddled color?

      • ostiariusalpha

        They still see light fine. Either color would be visible, just with a reduced ability to distinguish green from red.

      • Flounder

        It would probably (depending on type of color blindness) be a grey dot……. So garbage.

    • iksnilol

      There’s plenty of blue and amber dot sights.

      • GaryOlson

        Thank you for that comprehensive and informative rebuttal. Please list all the blue dot sights your exhaustive research has discovered. Exclude all sights whose OEM is Ncstar; I don’t feel like throwing money in the trash.

        • iksnilol

          https://www.trijicon.com/na_en/products/product3.php?pid=RM04

          Pretty much all trijicon sights can be gotten with an amber color.

        • Flounder

          Trijicon makes their 4x and 3.5x in blue. And there might be multiple variants of the blue like dual illuminated, battery, tritium only. Although to my knowledge these are by order only. If you are having trouble… You just need to spend more money. (cries with laughter). But then again, you said you didn’t want cheap or frugal, so this IS PERFECT! For you, given the information offered so far.
          Trijicon also offers all optics in amber. And the have a “yellow” option now. idk if that is just rebranding the amber or something different.

          I think(but am not sure) eotech made a limited edition model that was themed and the reticle was blue. I bet you won’t like it if you can find it. I think (90% sure) eotech also did a zombie green one once…

          Aimpoint… Laughs at your request and says you are too poor to deal with anyways.

          Vortex… Too new, They barely started doing green. But they might have snuck blue in somewhere. Send a request in, give them an idea that they can run with and you might see it in a year or two. They are very much up and coming. Their prism optics are red green…

          Holosun/primary arms…. I think they have done green… This company is all about diversifying their optics line up. Contact them and see if they can do a blue reticle. You might see it drop in a year or two.

          Meprolight. All their colors are weird. Give them a look. Their green might actually work despite being RG colorblind. Their colors are off like their “amber” is almost orange.

          Not to be mean or sassy, but, if you are having problems finding an optic to work with red green color blindness, you either haven’t looked enough or are just too cheap to spend money to get something that will work. Yes, you will probably have to pay msrp if you want a special optic to solve your specific problem. Call the manufacturers and see what they can do for you. If enough people called, then you could potentially get them to launch a new optic line.

      • AlanHan

        There are, aren’t there!

        • iksnilol

          https://www.ar15.com/forums/ar-15/Red__Green_Dot_Sights_for_the_Color_Blind_Individual_/18-612503/

          Funny enough, you ain’t the only color blind guy asking about dot sights.

          But I’m thinkin’, does the color really matter as long as you see the dot as a source of light and not the color itself. Just turn up the brightness.

          • AlanHan

            Humor me. I was pointing out that “There’s plenty of …sights” is country. “There are” is standard. Laugh. I like it when people pass subtle hints about my Swedish. So I… well, obviously. Best.

          • Paul White

            for those of us with astigmatism, it doesn’t show up as a dot; you just see a ton of little specs of color all over.

          • iksnilol

            Can you use it to tacticall engage a tango at 200 meters?

    • ActionPhysicalMan

      That sucks. I wish I could think of a solution. I have cross dominance, shaky hands, and a preference for guns you can hardly get any accessories for at all so you have my sympathy for sure.

    • Flounder

      Trijicon has made amber optics since the begining. I have also seen blue ACOGs. And then the website says they have yellow optics now. So… If you look, you can find something. Which those who are color blind will be used to at this point. They know sometimes they have to hunt around to find something that works for them despite their handicap. Just like lefties! 😉

  • Reason 6 – Cause you be tacticool

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      I don’t care about how I look at the range, just that I shoot better during that range trip than I did before.

  • Deadeye Dan

    I can understand eyesight, but I was a little disappointed when I checked one out in the store. I’ve got pretty bad astigmatism and I was hoping that I could use a red dot on my night stand gun so wouldn’t need to put my glasses on, but all I saw was a red blob when looking through the sight.

    As for sight acquisition, if your sights aren’t lined up exactly where you want them to be when you draw, then you need to work on your draw until muscle memory will put those sights exactly over what you’re looking at every time. Same with reacquiring sight picture after firing. If the sights aren’t right back on target it’s a grip problem.

    I’ve seen what shooters like Jerry Miculek, Todd Jarret, and many others can do with just iron sights, and until I can get that good, the $400-$600 would be better spent on ammo for practice. That’s neat if it can instantly give better times, but I want to actually be the best, not just rely on a gadget.

    • Palmier

      What’s the difference between a red dot and a red blob?

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      Try turning the dot brightness down?

      As long as the bullets go into where the blob is, I don’t see the problem.

    • Robert Genovese

      I’m in the same boat. I had to stop using res dots unless they were prism red dots. Even with prism red dots they become distracting and get so enlarged you can’t easily engaged the target. I had to change to scopes with my rifles to fix that problem.

  • Tacbear

    I have done something similar to give the Red Dot concept a try. I screwed a SITE-MOUNT.COM Pic rail backup site mount to my Airsoft Gas Blowback XDM and have a cheap Weaver Red Dot attached. After about 3000 shots I have been able to present and immediately see the dot about 90% of the time . I now have a Dueck Defense RBU with a Vortex Venom on my NOT-A-Glock Timber Wolf build.

  • Ben

    But will the red dot hold up to a blow from a hammer??

    • gusto

      would irons?

      an aimpoint micro can survive and keep zero when taken of, tossed 25meters back and forth and put on the rifle again

  • flyfishr

    This sounds like a lame attempt to justify a RMR purchase to his wife.

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      I haven’t had to justify a gun purchase to my wife ever. I guess I am lucky.

      • Wolfgar

        She’s a keeper 🙂

        • iksnilol

          Y’all have horribly low standards.

          • Wolfgar

            My wife is a B shooter and a very good shot. Insulting women in general is not a healthy habit! let alone women who can shoot 🙂

            iksnilol, thrill seeker!

          • iksnilol

            I meant just that it’s kinda sad if y’all have to hide purchases from eachother.

          • Wolfgar

            It is more of a humorous joke among many of us married gun owners than a reality. Wives of gun owners are very understanding, most of the time LOL.

  • Tym O’Byrne

    To make my dot i chose “Jiffy Orange” instead of red, seemed like the best finger nail polish colour at the dollar store at the time for my front sight post…umm, whats the topic again? lol

  • thedonn007

    What pistol would you recommend that is the size of a glock 19 for the purpose of mounting a Trijicon RMR. Also, how much does it cost for the RMR slide milling.

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      Costs can range from about $100 to a few hundred depending on who does the milling. I would recommend that you don’t skimp on the machine work.

      As for a gun that is Glock 19 size, there is nothing wrong with the Glock 19. If you are super against Glocks, the CZ P10 C or the new M&P Compact M2.0 are solid options.

    • Dr. Daniel Jackson

      Sig sells a P320 that comes with a red dot already mounted and zeroed in compact size which is similar size to the Glock 19.

      I priced it out and atleast around me it is the most affordable option for a center-fire pistol with a red dot.
      I have been debating if I want to buy a P320 red dot compact 9mm,Rhino revolver in .40,Ruger GP100 .44 special,or a 1911 in .38 super. Leaning towards the Rhino though been wanting revolver that takes moon clips.

  • M1911

    I recently changed from shooting Production in USPSA to shooting Carry Optics. I put a DeltaPoint Pro on my Glock 34. As I near age 60, I find that I have a very hard time seeing the front sight.

  • Mike Price

    I’ve got red dots on most of my guns. If you wear glasses you can’t beat it. I can’t see iron sights. Well, I see them but slightly blurred on one or the other. Usually the front post. Most accurate you can get on any gun. Putting another one on one of my 22 pistols right now.

  • Porty1119

    It’s a pistol. Unless I shot in competitions, the $400-500 for the optic and slide milling is better spent on ammunition for the pistol, or for the rifle that I SHOULD BE USING IN THE FIRST PLACE. It’s not a practical use of funds for a real-world user providing their own equipment.

  • Rnasser Rnasser

    Main benefits of RDS are:
    – better for people with eyesight problems, no focus problems
    – better accuracy at >15 yds or so for most people
    – much easier for long range shots, since raising the sights does not obscure the target
    – excellent for night shooting
    – sight height allows shooting with suppressors
    – you can “look through” the sight, allowing more peripheral vision

    Cons are:
    – cost
    – bulk
    – potential reliability issures: fog, mud, rain, blood, etc. obscuring the sight (and BUIS); or a simple dead battery or RDS malfunction. Even the best RDS will be less reliable than irons.
    – up to 10 yds or so, even very proficient shooters find iron sights just as fast or faster

  • Docduracoat

    Someone mentioned lasers
    I think lasers are far superior to red dots on pistols
    My crimson trace on my Sig 938 is visible for 30 feet in bright sunlight, further on cloudy days
    It allows me to shoot without having to bring the gun up to eye level
    I can make hits shooting one handed at a man size target while running away at full speed
    It also allows all kinds of unusual shooting positions like staying prone, looking under the car or couch and shooting over the top of the cover
    And making aimed hits!
    Both eyes open, glasses, no glasses, presbyopia, astigmatism, you still see a laser as a dot on the target
    The only thing faster than a laser is point shooting where you don’t use any sights at all

  • Indianasteve

    I read the Lucky Gunner article and yes, I believe you are correct. I always wondered if I was doing something wrong or if it always worked that way. I will have to try it with a magnified scope sometime now. Thanks.

  • john huscio

    Just gimmie a good bright set of night sights and im set.