With preorder shipments heading out to dealers across the country, Q’s Honey Badger is rolling into regular sales with a head of steam. Of course, the lightweight 300BLK carbine (and 5.56mm too) isn’t the only silencer on the Portsmouth, New Hampshire company’s menu. Alongside the Honey Badger, Q also offers the Thunder Chicken, Trash Panda, Full Nelson and Half Nelson. Not including their rimfire offerings.

Recently I saw some requests for a size comparison between the Honey Badger silencer and other Q models. Pictured (top to bottom) is the Honey Badger, Thunder Chicken and Trash Panda silencers.

Up next are a host of new weapons (see what I did there), including a design for California and additional silencers.

Honey badger


Live Q Or Die

 

At first glance, The Honey Badger™ by Q appears to be the same as the original. Q focused on taking the iconic ‘Badger to the next level and improved upon every technical aspect of the first-generation design. From the gas system to the trigger, and telescoping stock – HB 2.0 does not disappoint. And this one will make it to your dealer.



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  • Evan

    No forward assist. I really hate this fad of removing the forward assist.

    • Isaac O. Lees

      The forward assist is utterly pointless. It was pointless in the ’70s and it’s pointless now. It’s just added weight and machine time with no benefit.

      • Eric Breda

        I call B.S. Pointless as long as you dont need it. It serves it’s purpose when the bolt carrier doesn’t go home all the way. The carrier slides in a tube of the upper receiver, not just rails like on other systems (AKM, etc..) Leave it on!

        Semper Fi
        Wpns Co. 2/1

        • Evan

          As a fellow Marine (G co. 2/7), I agree entirely.

          • Eric Breda

            Tell us about your personal service and experience Isaac.

        • Isaac O. Lees

          And you never need it. If the bolt doesn’t go in all the way, just use the dust cover cutout on the carrier to shove it home with your thumb, or give the charging handle a quick pull and release. If the gun isn’t going into battery, chances are there’s a bigger problem, either you’ve got a deformed cartridge, something is in the chamber, your recoil spring is failing, or you’re not lubed properly.

          • Evan

            That doesn’t actually work. At least not in field conditions. The forward assist is an excellent piece of equipment.

          • Isaac O. Lees

            Maybe if you have weak twiggy manlet fingers. I’ve never found the forward assist necessary, and often it does more harm than good. If the bolt is so unwilling to go into battery that you can’t just shove it with your thumb, there’s probably a bigger problem that forcing it will only make worse.

          • Evan

            Or if you’re wearing gloves, or if you’ve been firing and heated up the bolt, and even if it did work, the forward assist works better and has no disadvantages other than the imaginary weight issue.

          • Douglas Pickerell

            Seems like the old debate of ” I rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it”

            Also while I agree it could be a bigger issue not like you can stop a fire fight and take your gun to a armorer

          • Timmah_timmah

            So…. Chamber a fresh round! Problem solved!

          • Evan

            So waste a round for no reason when a quick tap with the forward assist will take care of it?

          • Timmah_timmah

            Well put sir

          • Timmah_timmah

            How does chambering a fresh round with the CH not work in the field? BS.

          • Timmah_timmah

            Bingo.

          • AlanHan

            Isaac, the FA comes into its own when you need to chamber a round quietly, in the dark, under pressure.

            The FA is like Winston Churchill’s famous “pistol need:” A soldier rarely needs a forward assist on his M16/M4, but when he does, he needs it very badly.

        • Timmah_timmah

          BS…. Just because you’ve used it once or twice doesn’t mean it was the only or even the best solution for that problem.

          • Eric Breda

            On the current system from the M16 (SP1) to the M16A4 and M4A1 it is the optimal solution until a new system is adopted and fielded. It serves it’s purpose, it’s there if and when you need it. “Push, pull, and tap” are a staple of the manual of arms when locking and load in the Corps for 50 years now.

      • USMC03Vet

        If you’ve ever used the rifle off a shooting range you’d realize how useful the forward assist is.

        • Timmah_timmah

          I’ve used them plenty and wholeheartedly disagree. Sorry.

        • jack

          1. Insert Fresh mag, (Fresh meaning its been inventory so long it should out rank you)
          2. Rack Charging Handle
          3. Do a brass check (even though you *know* it chambered that round might just have dissappeared into the same place your all your Liberty Requests go)
          4. Tap Forward assist because to compensate for your obsessive and unnessecary brass checking.

          Just like Drill Instructor taught you.

          • Amplified Heat

            Ohhhh, so it’s a crappy clapped-out rifle/magazine workaround issue; now I see. On that same note, we should definitely add crank-nuts to front of all our military engines’ crank shafts so we can keep using them even after the starters fail & we have to turn them over by hand.

            Mags that fail in storage and badly worn rifles seem just *a bit* more deserving of scrutiny, but that’s just my private sector logic clouding things.

      • Amplified Heat

        But jillions of enlistees trained to tap it after every bolt-release internalized it, and now can’t imagine ‘operating’ without it. The line “was the FA even the best or correct resolution to whatever problem it got you through?” doesn’t even figure in to the calculus, of course. Maybe it’s because I’m a civilian, but I’m confused by the dead-nuts reliability of the AR (“so long as it runs wet…except when it needs to run perfectly dry”) and the need for a device specifically scabbed-on as a workaround to poor operation (itself rather damning evidence of some kind of design issue)

        I happen to believe that 90% of the reason the carrier wouldn’t go home quite fully (but can still be tapped home) is due to operator short-stroke of the charging handle, itself the result of the handle being awkwardly far to the rear and unable to be used easily with the butt braced against the shoulder & cheek. One design compromise (redesign of the original charging handle) that led to another once met with non-ideal conditions (redesign of the ammo originally, but later on blowing sand & tolerances opened up by wear)

        • Eric Breda

          As you stated, “your a civilian.”

    • Michael Boudreaux

      Stoner never wanted a forward assist. If you do some research on the history of the AR15 you;ll see that the army added it against stoners wishs to fix issues that they caused by using the wrong powder.

      • Evan

        What Stoner wanted is irrelevant. The forward assist was added because it was needed. It was needed in the 60s, and it was needed in 2003-2007 when I served, and used it more than once, and it’s still needed. The forward assist keeps a minor issue from becoming a major one. Just because leaving them off is fashionable now doesn’t mean it’s a good idea.

        • Isaac O. Lees

          No, it was added for no reason. It was the design equivalent of gun control: a bandaid to make people feel better about a problem that didn’t really exist. Just because you’ve used it once or twice doesn’t mean it was the only or even the best solution for that problem.

          • Evan

            Right. I’m assuming you were never in the military, and don’t understand field conditions. Because if you had, you wouldn’t have jumped on this “no forward assist” bandwagon that’s all about removing a necessary piece of gear to save an ounce of weight. Making guns worse to save negligible amounts of weight seems very fashionable these days, and is retarded.

          • Timmah_timmah

            please do tell what can be accomplished with FA that can’t be done by hand (finger tip on the carrier) or by racking the CH for a fresh round that isn’t defective?

          • Evan

            A fingertip might work fine on the range, but not in the field.

          • Kelly Jackson

            Because if you ACTUALLY fired your weapon repeatedly, I like I dunno, a gun fight? Than your carrier is extremely hot and not exactly the sort of thing you’d want to put your finger on.

            Seriously, have you ever even fired an AR15? Because it sounds like you haven’t.

          • Flounder

            There were reasons. It can sometimes be used to override minor issues in other places in the gun. It doesn’t fix those problems though. It is a desperate, I would rather have a really crappy bolt action gun than nothing addition.

            It serves a purpose. And you are only saving 2-3oz by removing it. But a civilian will never use it. And they should never have a need to use it.

          • Brett baker

            Obviously, you’ve never hunted with an AR. If you just left the truck, and a groundhogs pops up you’ll try to quietly chamber a round. If the bolt doesn’t go into battery, the FA will get you ready to fire quickly and quietly.

          • Timmah_timmah

            Or… use your goddamn finger on the carrier. What a concept!

          • Evan

            Unless you’re wearing gloves, or your your bolt is hot, and either way a forward assist works better.

          • Timmah_timmah

            Exactly. Its a band aid.

          • BillyOblivion

            And you’ve never, ever used a bandaid, or grabbed a paper towel to apply pressure/soak up the blood until you could get to the doctor to get stitches, right?

            Yeah, the Forward Assist is there to *bandaid* a problem UNTIL YOU GET TIME TO LOOK AT IT.

            Looking at it when someone is trying to kill you is a bad idea. Kill them first, then look at it.

          • Timmah_timmah

            Just because you’ve used it once or twice doesn’t mean it was the only or even the best solution for that problem.

            EXACTLY.
            END DEBATE/

        • iksnilol

          I like the forward assist because I like fiddling with it. Doesn’t hurt to press it once in a while when bored.

        • Timmah_timmah

          Or use the friggin CH as intended. Chamber a fresh round. What should be done anyways.

        • Corey

          I agree. I’ve used the damn thing downrange on more than one occasion. In reality it solves the milspec buffer spring problem, and the operator failing to release the bolt catch and riding the charging handle forward. When you work in the surf and you need to drain your carbine it allows you to silently ensure the bolt is fully seated without alerting enemies nearby be releasing the bolt catch from full open battery.

      • Isaac O. Lees

        This. And keep in mind, this is the same Army that actively sabotaged the M16 in trials to prop up their dumpster fire of a modernized Garand.

      • Kelly Jackson

        Stoner didn’t design the AR15, James Sullivan created the AR15 from the AR10.

        Second, while your forward assist may never get used at your local 100 yard range I absolutely used by when deployed to Iraq.

        • Michael Boudreaux

          Correct and jim sullivans design didn’t have a forward assist either.

    • Flounder

      Some like it, some hate it. Most don’t use it much if ever.

      My opinion? If you are using it, then you have a problem you need to know about somewhere in the gun. The FA can sometimes override the more minor problems and get you running again. But it does nothing to address the underlying problem. You are just kinda trying to force it back into action and ensuring that the problem will come back later to bite you. But at that time, you can use the FA again.

      I have guns with both of them. If I want weight savings, it is the first thing that gets removed. It also makes a build slightly cheaper. and less complicated to build. But it has merit. It ultimately depends how you were trained and how you plan to use the rifle. So for most gun owners who are <1000rds/yr it is worthless. For others, it is required.

      It is a lot like the taper pin vs set screws. Both will serve the vast majority equally well. Others will require one or the other.

    • Timmah_timmah

      You need a new cause for outrage. Forward assist is worthless.

      • Evan

        Not for those of us who were in the military and used it quite often.

      • Eric Breda

        Lock and load, push-pull and TAP…

    • USMC03Vet

      Pretty important part if you intent to use the weapon off the range for sure.

    • jack

      But without a forward assist how will I get my 5.56 rifle to go into battery on my .300 Blackout Cartridge?

    • Sam

      Failure to adapt.

  • Kenneth Wilkinson

    Like the gun, hate the color!

    • plumber576

      “Judge by content of caliber and not color of cerakote.”

      -Some famous guy, probably

  • Max Müller

    Their page is confusing. It does weight 5pound 4 ounces with silencer (with no silencer). Like what exactly are they trying to tell me? Revolutionary air supressor that is both there and not there, that does not weight anything?

    • Beju

      Schrodinger’s Suppressor.

    • mig1nc

      On Instagram Q says it’s the weight with suppressor. By the way, follow them on Instagram. They post lots of cool gun porn.

  • Timmah_timmah

    Am I the only one that thinks this gun was never intended as a service weapon so all this justification for FA from field use is kind of nonsense?

    • Evan

      Basically.

    • Texas-Roll-Over

      Incorrect, the original HB concept was for a mil contract.

  • Zach Robinson

    I’d like to point out that part of the first paragraph was phrased in such a way that it made it seem as if the Honey Badger is a suppressor. It isn’t, obviously. Somebody else proof read this and tell me if I’m crazy:

    “Of course, the lightweight 300BLK carbine (and 5.56mm too) isn’t the only silencer on the Portsmouth, New Hampshire company’s menu. Alongside the Honey Badger, Q also offers the Thunder Chicken, Trash Panda, Full Nelson and Half Nelson. Not including their rimfire offerings.”

    • Pete – TFB Writer

      Hey Zach. It’s actually both. The top silencer is actually called “honey badger”. Of course the carbine istself is also the Honey Badger.

      • Zach Robinson

        I see it now. I had to right click view image to get it large enough to see the model on the can. Granted, it externally looks like a Full Nelson and as far as I can tell the “Honey Badger” named suppressor is only being offered if purchased with the gun itself. It doesn’t appear to be a stand alone sku on Q’s website. Thus is it appropriate to surmise that the “Honey Badger” suppressor is a renamed Full Nelson when sold with the SBR? Anyone? Bueller?

      • Zach Robinson

        NVM I see it on Soldier Systems now. The “Honey Badger” suppressor is 1.5″ outside diameter to fit within the confines of a handguard. All of Q’s other suppressors are 1.75″.

  • Amplified Heat

    You know, it took me a while, but I just got it; this gun looks exactly like a CETME LC. The baby-poo green made it finally “click” for me. the stock, the slab-sides, the overall size of the thing (slightly smaller than an HK53). Now I’m really tempted to do an LC-SD in blackout for my build as an homage to the Honey Badger.

  • Sianmink
  • Corey

    lol Such a meddlesome creature.. Honey Badger does.