[Army 2017] Crazy Kalashnikov firearms demonstration

A live webcast from the Concern Kalashnikov shooting club was broadcasted last weekend as part of the Army 2017 exhibition.

I was there recently for the first IPSC Rifle World Shoot, and it was a great event.

Their shooting range is second to none and features a massive amount of shooting bays with very high back stops in 3 directions.

In the video I think they are shooting side to side, as it would be foolish to shoot back at the spectators.

I have checked the video a few times and I it really seems they are doing these exercises with live ammunition. As you can judge from both the pictures and the video, at least some kind of projectiles are leaving the barrels.

When they hit the steel it sound like real bullets to me.

Below you can see some kind of simulated hostage situations. Steel plates are the bad guys, but there’s a good guy in the middle as well.

To the rescue. They get a little head-shot help from a sniper too in the video.

Bad guys down, get the hostage home.

And some live fire drills.

I guess they are using Vityaz-SN 9×19 sub machine guns. https://kalashnikov.com/en/product/firearms/mle/vityaz-sn.html

Shooting on the move.

Confidence shots.

“Report from the demonstration performances of employees of the Concern “Kalashnikov”

You can see the Kalashnikov building to the left, with the panorama deck on top.

During the World Shoot, top USA shooter Jerry Miculek was interviewed from the panorma:  http://kalashnikov.media/en/media/videolibrary/4516333

In Russian they are described as “The arrows of the Kalashnikov Concern”.

9×19 mm with and without hush-hush.

And with handguns.

You can see them shoot 90 degrees cant from their ATC in the video.

Just another day at the office in Russia.

In the video you can also see them shooting clays with a sniper rifle. They clays are held in a holder by people.

Please don’t try any of these exercises by yourself!





Eric B

Ex-Arctic Ranger. Competitive practical shooter and hunter with an European focus. Always ready to increase my collection of modern semi-automatic firearms, optics and sound suppressors. Owning the night would be nice too.


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  • Timmah_timmah

    Did the target holders have a choice in the matter?

    • Gordon Pasha

      Sure: Hold the target or be the target. 😉

    • Foma Klimov

      No. This is how we deal with the opposition degenerates in Russia. Most get shot eventually. The ones that survive their tour as target holders, become very loyal. I highly recommend it for your own historic statue-defacing, violent liberasts.

  • nightclubber

    They’re really using live ammunition, it is said on the video

  • rychastings

    I wonder how many people get hurt doing stuff like this?

  • Bill

    “Please don’t try any of these exercises by yourself!”

    Well of course I can’t do these by myself, I need someone voluntold to be the hostage/target holder.

  • Wm

    My uncle had a good story about his time in Europe in WWII. He said his unit was the one that first met the Russians on the Elba river. They were hugging, shaking hands, etc and exchanging things. A Russian gave him his watch and my uncle gave him a bar of soap as many were bathing in the river at that point. He said he was much surprised when instead of bathing like others in the river with the soap, the Russian ate it. He also said later they were billited in a German army camp barracks with the US in one building and the Russians in the next one. He said the Russians stayed up all night drinking and shooting off their burp guns and pistols. Many of the US guys slept under their beds due to bullets occasionally coming through the walls. The next morning the Russians would drag out the bodies of those who had been accidentally shot during the nights festivities. Said it went on for a few days. Seems these guys are following in the footsteps…

    • Bill

      It’s all fun and games until someone shoots an eye out.

    • Just Say’n

      My uncle was liberated by Patton’s troops from a POW camp near Munich. The US troops said “stay here until someone comes for you” and left. He and a group of other British and Canadian flyers were near starving & set out for town looking for something to eat. They knocked on doors until they found a German Hausfrau who would fed them, then they politely thanked her and went on their way. When they got back to the camp they heard about all the unspeakable things the Russian flyers were doing on the other side of town while they were away. Obviously atrocities are committed by all parties during war, but different cultures indeed! Probably how they were raised (sorry a little off topic).

      • Brett baker

        Considering what the Germans did in Barbarossa, It’s not surprising.

        • Foma Klimov

          Most Americans probably don’t know that the German and their allies had razed half of all villages in towns in the USSR, executed 100 civilians for every German killed by the partisans, burned entire villages alive for suspected collaboration with the partisans, implemented “scorched earth” to starve the populace, etc, resulting in the deaths of up 15,000,000 civilians in the period of 3 years. About 10,000,000 Soviet women were raped, resulting in up to 800,000 pregnancies. Every family in the had USSR suffered, including mine. My great grandma died during a botched abortion, after being raped by Romanians occupying her city. She managed to hide her young daughters in the sewers, where they continued to live during the occupation, surviving on rats and rain water. The Soviet soldiers who made it to Germany, faced the kind of hardships and horrors that their American brethren could only imagine. Most have been fighting without a break for a long time and suffered from PTSD, after what they saw in the lands their liberated, including the worst of the concentration camps. Most had dead family members back home.

    • BeGe1

      I don’t doubt it. The old world seems to not have the same firearm safety concepts we do. They seem to all think that shooting at someone holding a target is the maximum of coolness and skill.

      And to be honest…I didn’t think that much of the skill level of these guys. Ok, a sniper operating from 20 yards. And CQB guys that don’t even point shoot. High-end units in U.S. forces never do LFAMs in such an environment until every guy is 100% point shooting perfect at those types of ranges.

      They didn’t do anything that pointed out any truly high-end skill other than the ability to do a pre-planned routine and a willingness to be cavalier with each other’s lives. I don’t have that much respect for either thing.

      • Bill

        “High-end units in U.S. forces never do LFAMs in such an environment until every guy is 100% point shooting perfect at those types of ranges.”

        If I find out a guy isn’t using his sights in a hostage rescue or other precision shooting scenario they’re being reassigned to the parking meter collection unit or spending the remainder of their rotation weighing and measuring semi trucks, not that those aren’t important duties.

        It’s a lot easier to get perfect hits when you actually aim, which is easily facilitated by using the freaking sights.

    • Foma Klimov

      Sorry to tell you, but neither of those things happened. They certainly knew what soap is in the USSR (Russians had a regular bathing culture long before you Westerners finally decided that it was cool to bathe more than once a year) and Russians and Americans never stayed close to each-other like that. Soviet soldiers wouldn’t be drinking and shooting off guns in their barracks at night, because they would had been shot for this. The discipline was iron.

  • Brett baker

    It would make James’ videos a lot beotter if he used some of the tricks in this video.

  • Johnsmyname

    None of this is impressive shooting by any means, am I missing something??

  • ActionPhysicalMan

    I can miss at that range too;-)

  • LCON

    What’s Russian for “Hold my Vodka!”

  • .45

    “So, Lebedev, I forget, we lean right first or left?”

    Anyway, that one guy had a really bad day, being held hostage, then getting shot after his new found buddies gave him the keys to their sweet ride. Bummer.

    Moving on, what’s up with the upside down German flag on their helmets? (I am vaguely aware there is some sort of controversy over which way to orient the German flag, but as of the modern world, that would be considered upside down I do believe.)

    Also, it seems to me that they are holding their rifles rather high when reloading. I get that you want to do everything up front and high where you can see around you as you work, but doesn’t blocking your vision with the rifle defeat the purpose?

  • Trent Tyre

    Why and how are these russian guys getting and using American stuff? I thought it was illegal to export American gun stuff.

    • They manufacture knock-offs when necessary. I like my T2 Micro, but it’s not like it is a super complex piece of kit, and I would think that almost any nation with a manufacturing capability could make them……. especially if they already have a pre-existing optics industry.

  • It’s not “arrows”, it’s “shooters”. When plural (strelki, стрелки), the word “little arrow” (strelka, diminutive from strela) is the same as the word “shooter” (strelok, a person who shoots). The stress is on different syllables in each case. Hence the mix-up.

  • cmbv79

    What’s the big dill? There are several units in Portugal that do the same.