Mod Zero – Multiple Guns But Same Optic

Mod Zero is coming out with an interesting concept. It is an adjustable picatinny rail system that you put on your rifles. You zero your optic of choice then swap the optic to another rifle with the Mod Zero rail system. Of course the optic will not have the same zero as the previous rifle setup. But you can adjust the Mod Zero. You zero the rail and then you can swap the optic across multiple guns that have the Mod Zero rail.

They are just starting a crowd funding campaign as well as looking for beta testers.

No word on price or when they will be released.

For more information, check them out here.





Nicholas C

Co-Founder of KRISSTALK forums, an owner’s support group and all things KRISS Vector related. Nick found his passion through competitive shooting while living in NY. He participates in USPSA and 3Gun. He loves all things that shoots and flashlights. Really really bright flashlights.

Any questions please email him at nicholas.c@staff.thefirearmblog.com


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  • A.WChuck

    I like the concept, but let’s see how they perform first.

  • Anonymoose

    Solution looking for a problem.

    • Mmmtacos

      The problem with the problemless solution is you can’t put a rear sight on it…

      It’s not a bad concept, but needs some more refinement. It would make more sense to build wind & elevation adjustments into a proprietary mount instead of a pic rail on a pic rail I think.

    • The Heretic

      Not everybody can afford to buy a $10K NVD for every rifle. So I think the problem and solution have been found – if it performs.

      • James I

        You should be able to sight in a scope with just a few rounds. The price of the scope doesn’t matter. I swap scopes quite often.

  • Kitten

    Could you put BeowulfX on it?.

  • Nick

    I see one serious flaw. Most red dots are made to be at roughly the right height when on an AR, since it’s the most common platform for them to be used on.

    Why is this a problem? The huge rise this thing puts on any optic attached to it. For a scope it could be fine if used with low rings, but most red dots would be an issue.

    • Nicholas C

      Not really. The most common redot is the Aimpoint Micro and there are plenty of different size risers. Low mount, absolute and lower 1/3 cowitness. You can find something that will work with this.

      • Matt Taylor

        NCstar disagrees with your “most common” angle. ;P

  • RogUinta

    I’ll buy three….so I can stack them on the same rifle and get 720 MOA of incline so I can shoot at 4000 meters with my Aimpoint!!

    • AZgunner

      11C?

      • iksnilol

        69th Chairborne, HOOAH, Semper fi, Devil Dog!

    • DanGoodShot

      Ha! Now thats funny right thar!

  • Haulin’ Oats

    I like it, but this rail adapter thingy needs a built in rear flip up iron sight.

    • Sledgecrowbar

      A low rear sight like the ones fightlite makes would fit the bill.

  • Kivaari

    Bausch and Lomb did this 60 years ago.

    • Julio

      Dentler are doing it right now and Browning is running their products as the Nomad system.

  • joshv06

    I’d rather just buy Holosuns and keep a premium optic on my main rifle.

  • Badwolf

    Hey bro… I heard you like rails

  • Sledgecrowbar

    Wouldn’t you still have to zero the optic each time because of how the picatinny rail clamp locks? I feel like it defeats the purpose. I want to like it.

    • Matt Taylor

      Definitely want to see how it pans out.

    • SGT Fish

      depends on if you use a quality mount or not

  • RICH

    It seems like a great idea. I hope it works out for them, the testing will tell !

  • noob

    it would be interesting if they came up with an AR15 upper that you could zero the top rail on for two ammo loads. That would reduce the parts count, lower the sightline and be overall neater.

  • iksnilol

    Uhm… for the price of multiple of these rails, can’t you just buy multiple optics?

    • MyFifteenthAccount

      “What is math and how do I do some?”

  • USMC03Vet

    The only purpose I see for this is when you want to take all the rifles to the range at once but didn’t want to buy an optic for each one. I get it, but seems like a solution to 1st world problems.

    • DC

      Say you have a high end scope but can only afford one, but the scope has efficacy on multiple rifles. Instead of having to adjust the zero as you swap the scope across rifle platforms the zero is already present thanks to the rail.

      That means no zeroing at the range.

  • Rusty

    Why wouldn’t you just mount your optics in QD mounts if you wanted to swap them amongst different rifles?

    • AD

      The issue is that you might need to zero the optics differently for your different rifles. The idea is that you can adjust this rail instead of the optic, so it’s doesn’t lose zero when moving between rifles.

      • Rusty

        Adjusting this rail seems the same hassle as zeroing your optic. I don’t get the benefit.

        • DC

          The rail adjustments mean your scope is already zeroed when it is mounted.

        • Matt Taylor

          You set the optic to a standard of zero. And then you put the optic on another rifle, and you zero that rail. And then the optic on another rifle, and you zero that rail. And then the optic… Rinse and repeat.

          Optic stays the same and doesn’t change per gun. You’re basically zeroing the gun to the optic. It just allows you to not have to zero the optic every time you switch it to a new gun.

  • 22winmag

    Perhaps it has some value as a range toy. For me, all of my rifles have permanently mounted, ready-to-go in an instant optics.

  • DanGoodShot

    If they cost around $50 and don’t take up a retarded amount of real estate. Sure, I can see that workin’ out. Take the optic off an Elcan Spectre and throw a picatinny rail in its place. I get it. Cool.

  • Sunshine_Shooter

    So… instead of re-zeroing your optic every time you put it on a rifle, you re-zero a rail every time you put it on a rifle. How is this not just extra money spent on replicating a function your optic already has?

    • Matt Taylor

      You set the optic to a standard of zero. And then you put the optic on another rifle, and you zero that rail. And then the optic on another rifle, and you zero that rail. And then the optic… Rinse and repeat.

      Optic stays the same and doesn’t change per gun. You’re basically zeroing the gun to the optic.

      • Sunshine_Shooter

        Oooooh, that makes sense. Okay, I like it now.