Canadian Sniper Sets New Confirmed Kill Record at 2.2 Miles

Crushing a record previously held by a British sniper, a Canadian special forces member now holds the title title for the longest confirmed kill. Measured at 3,450 3,540 meters, or approximately 2.2 miles, the member of the Joint Task Force 2 killed an Islamic State insurgent in Iraq using a McMillan TAC-50 rifle. For obvious reasons, officials are not releasing the name of the soldier, but say that the shot was “confirmed by video and other data”. Now that’s a LiveLeak video I want to see,

2.2 Miles confirmed kill

Canadian elite special forces sniper sets record-breaking Confirmed kill shot in Iraq

A sniper with Canada’s elite special forces in Iraq has shattered the world record for the longest confirmed kill shot in military history at a staggering distance of 3,450 metres.

Sources say a member of Joint Task Force 2 killed an Islamic State insurgent with a McMillan TAC-50 sniper rifle while firing from a high-rise during an operation that took place within the last month in Iraq. It took under 10 seconds to hit the target.

“The shot in question actually disrupted a Daesh [Islamic State] attack on Iraqi security forces,” said a military source, who stressed the operation fell within the strictures of the government’s advise and assist mission. “Instead of dropping a bomb that could potentially kill civilians in the area, it is a very precise application of force and because it was so far way, the bad guys didn’t have a clue what was happening.”

A sniper with Canada’s elite special forces in Iraq has shattered the world record for the longest confirmed kill shot in military history at a staggering distance of 3,450 metres.

Sources say a member of Joint Task Force 2 killed an Islamic State insurgent with a McMillan TAC-50 sniper rifle while firing from a high-rise during an operation that took place within the last month in Iraq. It took under 10 seconds to hit the target.

“The shot in question actually disrupted a Daesh [Islamic State] attack on Iraqi security forces,” said a military source, who stressed the operation fell within the strictures of the government’s advise and assist mission. “Instead of dropping a bomb that could potentially kill civilians in the area, it is a very precise application of force and because it was so far way, the bad guys didn’t have a clue what was happening.”

The kill was independently verified by video camera and other data, The Globe and Mail has learned.

“Hard data on this. It isn’t an opinion. It isn’t an approximation. There is a second location with eyes on with all the right equipment to capture exactly what the shot was,” another military source said.

A military insider told The Globe: “This is an incredible feat. It is a world record that might never be equalled.”

The world record was previously held by British sniper Craig Harrison, who shot a Taliban gunner with a 338 Lapua Magnum rifle from 2,475 metres away in 2009.

Previously, Canadian Corporal Rob Furlong had set the world record in 2002 at 2,430 metres when he gunned down an Afghan insurgent carrying an RPK machine gun during Operation Anaconda.

Weeks before, Canadian Master Cpl. Arron Perry briefly held the world’s best sniper record after he fatally shot an insurgent at 2,310 metres during the same operation. Both soldiers were members of the 3rd Battalion Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry.

JTF2 special forces are primarily tasked with counterterrorism, sniper operations and hostage rescue. Much of the information about this elite organization is classified and not commented on by the government. The unit’s snipers and members of Canadian Special Operations Regiment, who are carrying out the main task of training Kurdish forces, have been operating in tough conditions in Iraq.

The Trudeau government pulled CF-18 fighter jets out of Iraq in 2016 but expanded the military mission, which will see the number of Canadian special forces trainers climb to 207 from 69 in an assist, train and advise mission. Canadian commandos are not supposed to be involved in direct combat, but are authorized to go up to the front lines on training missions with Kurdish Peshmerga fighters and to paint targets for coalition air strikes.

For operational security reasons, sources would not reveal the names of the elite Canadian sniper and his partner, nor the location where the action took place.

A sniper and his observer partner are often sent to remote and dangerous locations to hunt down insurgents while having to carry heavy equipment. Once they have located the target, snipers follow the same methodical approach before each shot. Breathe in, out, in, out, find a natural pause and then squeeze the trigger.

Canada has a reputation among Western military forces for the quality of its snipers, despite the small size of the Canadian Armed Forces compared to the United States and Britain.

“Canada has a world-class sniper system. It is not just a sniper. They work in pairs. There is an observer,” a military source said. “This is a skill set that only a very few people have.”

The skill of the JTF2 sniper in taking down an insurgent at 3,450 metres required math skills, great eyesight, precision of ammunition and firearms, and superb training.

“It is at the distance where you have to account not just for the ballistics of the round, which change over time and distance, you have to adjust for wind, and the wind would be swirling,” said a source with expertise in training Canadian special forces.

“You have to adjust for him firing from a higher location downward and as the round drops you have to account for that. And from that distance you actually have to account for the curvature of the Earth.”

U.S. Sergeant Bryan Kremer has the longest confirmed sniper kill shot by a U.S. soldier. He killed an Iraqi insurgent with his Barrett M82A1 rifle at 2,300 metres in 2004.

Story and graphic credit: The Globe And Mail



Pete

LE – Science – OSINT.
On a mission to make all of my guns as quiet as possible.
Pete.M@staff.thefirearmblog.com
Twitter: @gunboxready
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  • DW

    At that distance muzzle report is reduced beyond recognition, but everyone heard this loud and clear: “Sorry”

    • TechnoTriticale

      So is a .50 BMG out of a TAC-50 still supersonic at that range?

      The reports I’ve seen so far don’t address whether this was a first shot kill. And how many tries the shooter gets would depend to some extent on what indication of misses is experienced in the target zone (plus whatever noise the opfors are locally involved in).

      And on reports, the first I saw said .338 Lapua, so we need to be cautious about information from our crack modern press (who need to do less crack).

      • Major Tom

        “So is a .50 BMG out of a TAC-50 still supersonic at that range?”

        Not really. But .50 BMG is heavy enough that slowing to subsonic doesn’t automatically mean it suddenly destabilizes completely and veers off at a random trajectory unlike rifle-caliber small arms.

      • micmac80

        Shots at such distances are potshots even with beast gear and balistic solution even previous records at much shorter distances were at XY shot on some ocasions well past 50 shots.

        • TechnoTriticale

          re: Shots at such distances are potshots even with…

          A 10 second time-in-flight probably needs a relatively stationary target (e.g. another sniper, crew-served weapon operator, spotter, etc.).

          But as Major Tom confirms on the subsonic aspect, the lack of a sonic crack means the missing earlier rounds might well go unnoticed, unless they strike something close by.

          • FarmerB

            And how does a spotter see this slowing bullet? You’d have to have the target be in a bowl of powdered dust to see the splash, and you’d have to think he’d notice.

          • TechnoTriticale

            re: And how does a spotter see this slowing bullet?

            MQ-50JB Spotterdrone?
            Probably not tracer either☺, even one-way.
            Nor guided {yet}, although DARPA has worked on that for .50BMG.

            It’s a great question, actually. Since it appears that, typically, multiple shots are required, how does the team adjust shot-to-shot?

          • FarmerB

            That’s the whole point. If you cannot see the fall of shot, you guess or go home. And tracers don’t burn for 10 seconds. They can help with windage, but not elevation.

          • jcitizen

            I’ve seen .22 lr bullets at 300 yards in a good spotter scope. The back of most bullets are shiny enough to be well lit with ambient light.

          • FarmerB

            You mean in flight? I’ve fired many thousands of rounds at 300m targets with 5.56 and never seen one in flight 🙂 Just remember that 3000 yards is 100 times more difficult. In fact, I’m not sure it helps to see it flying. Even with tracers it’s hard to see where the trajectory intersects the targets, especially for elevation.

          • jcitizen

            It helps, if the bullet base is flat shiny copper coated, and the sun is in the rear of the shooter. I only notice them briefly, of course, and tracer does just barely help, and as you said – only short range – I’ve had better luck with incendiary rounds, because the smoke trail lasts longer.

            I did fire an API once that hit a cliff after going though a 300 meter target, then ricocheted up and flew what seemed like 3/4 of a mile to the rear of the firing line. The range was dangerously dry, so the fire fighting detail took off after it, and found in on the ground still pointing the direction it was last seen taking, with the jacket about five inches from the core, still in line and smoking hot. That thing looked like a UFO flying straight 100 ft off the ground!!

          • FarmerB

            Frightening how many bullets ricochet which you never notice until using tracers…

          • jcitizen

            I started using tracer in .50 HBMG, .30 carbine, and 38 pistol calibers as a young man; but only the .30 carbine showed me the vagaries of ricochet on bullets proven by tracer. Maybe every 100 rounds might pop way up in the air and return near the shooter – but they just fell near my feet. Yeah it was a wake up call, and of course it made me very aware of the dangers of consideration for range safety control, but I was never that fearful of the whole thought of it, even though I know it should be considered. I would be willing to face prosecution for any mishandling of firearms that way – and yes it taught me a lot – but for some reason, I never feared it – maybe reality showed me how to be confident in safety. I really can’t answer that – but I’d NEVER forgive myself for injuring anyone any where NEAR my shooting activities!!

          • Eric B.

            Supersonic bullets often leave a VAPOR TRAIL (if conditions have enough humidity) that can be seen by spotters. This is a common way spotters see bullet flight.

          • jcitizen

            True – It was especially noticeable shooting .17 Remington center fire ammo. We had dry air so it had to be really hot footing it, to make a viable vapor trail. SLAP rounds did pretty good too.

          • Kivaari

            The target would hear it coming or passing by. it is quite loud even at subsonic ranges.

      • Flounder

        It is not supersonic. None of the top five shots have been supersonic iirc. I also don’t believe any of them were first shot hits. one of those is like the tenth shot.

        Although they also killed multiple people at that range. I think it is the brit…

        Crazy stories, each and every one.

      • Approximately 10,000 attoparsecs per microfortnight at impact.

        • FarmerB

          Interesting. In a previous life i used to deal in microfortnights.

      • retrocon

        It will be traveling st about 950 FPS at 3450 yards with the 750 grain a-max

    • 40mmCattleDog
    • Phillip Cooper

      Why would they hear sorry??

      • Xtorin O’hern

        because canada

    • cageordie

      Surely it’s “Sorry, eh”.

  • gusto

    judging from that picture it looks like the sniper didn’t even have a clear line of view towards the target?

    • Dr. Longfellow Buchenrad

      If you go far enough you would only be able to see him from the waist up due to the curvature of the earth.

      • Rick O’Shay

        I’m sure the sniper being on a high rise to start with probably helped a little.

      • Smiles

        What is curvature of Earth? I though it was flat.

    • Glenn Bellamy

      That “picture” is just an artist’s conception, and is marked “Not to scale.”

  • Juggernaut

    This stuff is getting beyond ridiculous

  • Matt in Australia

    Almost an extra kilometer. God bless Canada.

  • valorius

    o.O

  • Michael

    At these ranges one has to wonder how much of these shots is down to pure luck, considering the accuracy of such a combination of weapon and cartridge.

    • Get over it fanbois

      With current technology, the range of the .50 BMG while the TAC-50 is pretty good rifle. It depends on gear and skill rather than luck.

      • CommonSense23

        That shot is pretty much going to depend on far more luck than skill,

        • Rick O’Shay

          Maybe for you.

          • CommonSense23

            For pretty much anybody. First got to be in the AO. With the right gear, with targets. Then you got to have favorable shooting conditions. A good spotter who honestly deserves the most credit. And a target that is going to allow you the 5 to 10 shots needs to get on target.

          • TheNotoriousIUD

            The reason why its not luck is you could sit out there for three days blasting away at a steel plate at that distance and never hit it once.

          • CommonSense23

            What? Have you ever actually shot at distance?

          • FarmerB

            Yeah, I have. A lot. At that range, you need a lot of skill and practice to get the bullet landing in even the same postcard as the target. Then you need a ton of luck. God knows how the spotter even saw the bullet splash from that distance.

        • The luckiest motherhubbard in the world still has to have the rifle pointed in the right direction within an astoundingly small window of possible angles when the pin meets the primer; talent and skill are absolutely required to even recognize that window in the first place, much less put the rifle there and hold it until the bullet is on its way.

          • DW

            I don’t think he meant disrespect to the Canucks who did this, nor implying they lack skill. Those skill are absolutely required to find the mark and put bullet near them, however at that range with that many random variables after the trigger is pulled(wind changed directions or the daesh scum decided to move) that does involve a ton of smuggled maple syrup’s worth of luck.

        • Georgiaboy61

          It is a simple fact that the technology has arrived at a place where shots in excess of two miles are – if not exactly routine – at least somewhat common not only in the military precision rifle community, but amongst civilian ELR target shooters and competitors. The science behind it is mature and well-understood, and these elite soldiers have the best training and equipment money can buy.
          It shouldn’t be that mysterious. After all, the technical problems behind successful gunnery at extreme long range have already been addressed – some as much as a century ago – by the world’s navies and land-based heavy artillery forces. There is some complex calculation involved, but they were teaching this stuff at Annapolis and West Point before the Great War (WWI).

          • CommonSense23

            And these shots are still beyond skill and extremely luck dependent. We don’t even know how many shots this guy took, or even if he hit the guy he was aiming at. This is like a guy hitting a hole in one and thinking he is the best around. Its more luck dependent than skill dependent.

          • Georgiaboy61

            With all due respects, you clearly understand neither the technology or the math or the science involved. Luck has relatively little to do with that these superbly-trained and highly-skilled men did; they relied on their training and their hard-won experience and expertise. In other words, their professionalism.

            They probably also had one or more helicopters or other aircraft – perhaps UAVs – assisting them in visualizing the targets and the fall of their shots – as well as helping with other chores, such as range-finding. As well as spotters and/or friendly forces on the ground, within visual range of the tangos.

            It is now possible to visualize targets over the horizon. It’s been possible for years. Fire-control technology assisted by computers, laser-rangefinders and other sophisticated tech helped the U.S. destroy Iraqi tanks at beyond-visual range – and that was twenty-five years ago.

            It is nearly-certain that today’s soldiers have even more sophisticated and capable technology at their command.

            If this is “luck,” then why have precision marksmen – British, Canadian, U.S., etc. – been able to hit targets at progressively greater ranges over the passage of time?
            Gunnery Sergeant Carlos Hathcock hit a 2,000 yard shot during the Vietnam War using a makeshift scope affixed to the top of an ordinary Browning .50-caliber heavy machine gun. That was fifty years ago – and he didn’t have the benefit of any of the technology available today.
            For years, that was the long-distance record – until the present era and the GWOT.
            The physics and math involved aren’t that complex or complicated – easy pickings for a freshman/sophomore year physics or math major. Carlos Hathcock didn’t even go to college – but he got to go someplace even better for that kind of specialized martial knowledge – the United States Marine Corps.

          • CommonSense23

            I was trained as a sniper. I’ve seen the AARs of all these shots. These types of shots come down to primary luck. Once you hit a certain distance its goes beyond skill. And to primary luck. One of the previous record shots. The sniper didn’t even hit the guy he was aiming at. We don’t even know how many rounds this guy fired. Or even if he hit the guy he was aiming at.
            Guys have made further and further shots cause they have been given the opportunity to take these shots without any repercussion. And are allowed to keep shooting.

          • FarmerB

            Yeah, I had a quick talk with my shooting partner the other day and we reckon he had to hold off about 200m over the target (give or take with atmospherics). Well, without checking the scope specs, and assuming it’s in the field of view (I.e. he was aiming at a rock or something 200m above him). So, assuming the target is roughly 0.5m wide, the dude would have to hold the rifle vertical to within 7/100th of a degree to avoid missing due to cant.

          • FarmerB

            Yeah, I shoot at over 2000m. I know what’s involved. I understand the science. I shoot with 50’s/408/416 and 375’s. I have the best gear you can buy. I’m with CommonSense23. Lotsa luck here.

          • Georgiaboy61

            Hey, shine it on dude, whatever makes you happy.

          • jcitizen

            Our artillery unit quite often made direct hits with the first round. Range control used to get mad because they knew they had to fly another concrete cube back out to the target area later. An 8 inch round can buck the wind, but that doesn’t mean a good sniper can’t be pretty good at wind adjustment.

    • TheNotoriousIUD

      I think the only luck involved was getting the guy to hold still long enough for the bullet to arrive.

      • Sermon 7.62

        No, the man had to not stand still.

        • Kivaari

          He could have walked into the bullet just by bad luck.

          • Sermon 7.62

            That’s what happened.

    • Probably quite a bit of luck involved, but there ain’t many unlucky snipers who survive their first deployment, so…

    • TimRoy

      Past record holder Furlong says 3km shots are made regularly on the range.
      I think the biggest variable is whether the target moves during the 10 sec flight.
      Also, it would be interesting to know how many shots it took for the kill.
      On a video of one of these records (may have been Furlong), the target amazingly stayed in position while 2-3 shots splashed around him. Hard to believe he didn’t notice or was was too preoccupied to run.

      • FarmerB

        Hmmm. How many 3km sniper ranges are around? And how do they know they got hits? I’ve been on ranges with a few European sniper training sessions, and they just don’t put up reactive targets at 3km. 1000m or maybe even a bit more. 3km, not seen. A few pings at a rock across the valley? Right.

  • Gary Kirk

    Now, do it again..

  • Dr. Longfellow Buchenrad

    Whats a meter?

    • Rick O’Shay

      3.28 feet.

      • Dr. Longfellow Buchenrad

        Thats hardly convenient. Ill stick with yards.

        • Rick O’Shay

          One meter is like, an inch or two longer than a yard. So it’s pretty close. For every 100 meters, change it to 101 yards and it’s a pretty close approximation.

        • Major Tom

          Meters are easier to scale up. For example the difference between kilometers and miles. How many meters are in a kilometer? (1000) How many yards is a mile? (1760, much harder to remember.)

          • int19h

            Also helps when working with mils. An object of a certain size covering the angle of one mil is 1000x of that size away, which maps more naturally to metric units.

      • Edward Forney

        I was in the building business for 35 years, and not a single thing was measured in metric. A 2×4 will always be a 2×4 !

        • .45

          Then you also know that the average 2×4 is not in fact a 2×4…

          • Edward Forney

            Of course. That’s before it’s milled smooth. Same applied to all finished lumber. But a 4×8 sheet of plywood or drywall, IS still 4×8.

        • FarmerB

          Oh, you mean 5 x 10? Gotcha.

    • ostiariusalpha

      They’re what you have to put money in to park streetside if you don’t want to be fined in a lot of cities.

    • gusto

      the way the WHOLE world except you guys and some bumfvck nowhere countries like Burma and Liberia sees the world

      It is the logical and sane approach and yet you don’t use it?

      • Glenn Bellamy

        There are two kinds of countries in the world: those who have put men on the moon, and those who use the metric system.

        • Tassiebush

          There’s also those that use them both simultaneously and make rudimentary altitude errors with satelliites

          • AJ

            Oh major burn. Good reply tassbush

          • Tassiebush

            Hehe thanks. It’s only by picking at faults like that that I can feel consolation over the fact my country hasn’t achieved the same thing!

        • Jeez Louise

          In a few years, not anymore. So have fun with that joke.

          • Yeah, I’m sure they’ll be equipped with Desert Tech MDRs in case they encounter Moon Men, and they’ll be playing Half Life 3 all the way there.

        • Some Guy

          Well NASA used the metric system, the whole thing was based on german tech and von Braun was one of the most important persons for this project(he succesfully lobbied for it). The whole man on the moon thing is a rather poor argument against the metric system(and to some extend to boost your national ego because of the strong foreign influence).

          • mosinman

            not entirely , and von Braun’s work was based off of an American by the name of Robert H. Goddard

        • Friend of Tibet

          NASA used the metric system….epic fail

        • Major Tom

          The US military in conjunction with NASA does both.

        • jonp

          Boom!!!!lol

          2 kinds of countries: Those that use the metric system and The USA that have saved them from tyranny over and over and over…..

      • Dr. Longfellow Buchenrad

        Nope. Because America.

    • Evil Brad

      Same thing as a metre, but spelled wrong…

      • cwolf

        Or spell corrected by a machine

    • kyphe

      A meter is a device for measuring amounts. Gas meter, Water meter Electricity meter. My electricity meter is about 15cm per side and square so lets say a Meter is 60cm lol

    • int19h

      It’s kinda like yard, but longer. Used by nations that don’t need to fudge the count a bit higher to get nice numbers. =P

    • D. Spencer

      Metre not Meter.

    • Georgiaboy61

      1 meter = 1.09 yard

    • Kivaari

      100 meters is about 110 yards.

    • DwnRange

      3.28084 Feet
      3450 meters = 11,318.898 Feet, or 2.1437 miles = 3,772.966 yards

  • kgallerno

    Our JTF2 boys are not to be screwed with! Maybe once the pair of soldiers retire from the military their names might be released to the public so they can receive the kudos they deserve. Probably not though. JTF2 is highly secretive. Our government still barely acknowledges they exist.

    • Brett baker

      There’s a book called, “Waging War From Canada” by an ex-bureacrat who was An IRA sympathizer. One of the few parts of the Canadian government he said operatives should be afraid of is JTF2.

    • William

      Psst! Don’t tell Trudeau.

  • Jim Slade
  • Brett baker

    Ok, the New York State militia had a Good reason to p**** out in 1812!

  • Michael Shannon

    Another report says they were just trying to suppress an enemy position and didn’t expect to hit anyone. There’s no mention if this was the first or 50th shot or how many enemy were in the area. At what point does sniping become “shelling”? If he’d had a M2 Browning he might have got more.

    • kyphe

      Ah, if this was just a lucky hit and not an aimed deliberate hit then It would/should not count towards the record of a sniper hit.

      • Rick O’Shay

        Hitting a guy with a bullet from over two miles away, in a sniper role, whether it’s suppressive fire or just firing potshots, or actually aiming at a very specific target… it doesn’t matter. That’s some skillful sh!t. I say it counts.

    • Sermon 7.62

      That’s a more sensible report, then.

      Because if he had, for example, 1 moa dispersion in the end then his target had to be 105 cm in size.

      Even if TAC-50 holds 0.5 moa the bullet loses speed fast after 1,500m of so, and it isn’t as stable then and can’t keep the same 0.5 moa after that.

      • jcitizen

        The 750 AMAX is about as stable as is possible for a .50 cal round. I imagine the rifling twist for a McMillan may be custom as well, and they use pull button rifling, all of which can make a big difference.

        • Sermon 7.62

          As a bullet slows down, dispersion increases.

          • jcitizen

            Yes – with a good design – less.

          • Sermon 7.62

            Less is still more than 0.5 moa needed to make such a hit. There’s also wind to take into account.

          • jcitizen

            Well, at least a 750 grain bullet can buck the wind better that a Lapua .338.

          • Sermon 7.62

            But it will still destabilize and deviate at some point.

          • jcitizen

            I see your quibble and I fold.

          • Sermon 7.62

            Dude, what is so difficult to understand?

            Either the man started to walk after the shot and placed himself in front of the bullet, or the sniper just aimed at an “area target”, such as a group of people standing close to each other, and hit one of them.

          • jcitizen

            Because it make so little difference to me; that is why I fold.

          • FarmerB

            That’s why you’ve written about 25 replies here in the last few hours?

          • jcitizen

            Sometimes I get bored.

          • FarmerB

            Maybe, but I shoot with and against 50’s all the time, and I’ll pick my .338 any day to be more accurate no matter what the wind. Many shoot AMAX bullets, but most now shoot custom stuff.

          • jcitizen

            Oh yeah! I’m a .338 fan too – hope to be able to afford one some day. I feel it has a very important niche in the tactical field especially.

          • jcitizen

            Hathcock used tungston core AP bullets with his .50 HBMG missions. He knew the density of the core was as even as you could get, compared to lead or steel. Similar concept.

  • Klaus Von Schmitto

    Now wait a second – Aren’t Canadian meters worth only .76 of US meters?

    • Brett baker

      Depends. Several years ago they were worth 1.04 U.S. meters. I think it has something to do with George Soros😄

  • demarcus

    Videos or it didn’t happen.

  • Wetcoaster

    What is that, like a 600 foot drop?

    • #The Deplorable Boogur T. Wang

      A gnats azz over 10′

  • Brett baker

    Waiting for the 4000 meter record now.

  • MikeA

    Clearly the lesson learned is “don’t mess with Canada…” 3 of the top 5 belong to them.

  • sineva
  • John Ruhl

    OUT****INGSTANDING!!!
    Keep up the most excellent work Troop!!!

  • ro

    what is that? over a 500 ft. drop….better buy a lottery ticket

  • Outstanding work! The amount of math involved in to make a successful shot like this is enormous, and clearly distinguishes this sniper team. Everything from proper range estimation, bullet speed variables over distance in combination with bullet drop over distance, wind calculations at muzzle/along path/and at target, humidity, mirage, heart rate of shooter, and even coriolis effect. Then you have to have a very steady shooter behind the glass who can time the trigger break at a moment between heart beats to ensure the least amount of shooter input.

    Even though a bit of luck was involved in this shot, the hit was still made possible by a dedicated sniper team properly working and solving an incredible shot problem. Well done indeed!

    • Burntout Aussie

      Tried to explain ( simply ) Coriolis Effect to my Cobbers,. . .but their eyes glazed over ,
      Everybody hates nerds it seems, but I learned about that in Met training for a licence to drive airplanes yearz ago. . . Longest shot for me was 800 metres. . .

      Blew that paper banzai man away I did ( on the 12th shot ! )

      • Kivaari

        I had a pre-WW2 No. 3 Enfield guide that actually taught how to compensate for the Coriolis Effect. I couldn’t follow it if I still had the manual.

        • Burntout Aussie

          Hey mate,. . .I WAS a sniper in the ADF [ Australian Defence Force ] we were given American M14 rifles for training but on ‘Jobs’ were giveb ‘Other’ weapons which were Religiously taken away from us on return to base [ If we MADE it back to base ! ]

          I have absolutely NO idea, if the coriolis force had any effect whatsoever on my shots, as we were ‘Solo’ operators back then, ie, no trained ‘Observer’ guy to tell us the best time to ‘Send’ Things are completely different nowadays, and snipers are always a 2 man team.

          I Never tried a shot greater than 600 yards. . . in my 2 year stint with that department, but I was a really BAD man,. . Ie, following the Vietnam war, when all the enemies turned out to be our ‘Friends’, and being a practicing Christian too, I shot a target in his left thigh, and I fervently hoped that he survived . . . .This was deliberate as I was bloody good at what I did. . . .

          Less than Six months later, it was all over and the Australian Government was pouring aid into the areas where we had been killing people (GOOGLE THE Bougainville campaign )

          MY WORST experience ?. . .

          I was set up in a tree, around ten metres above the rainforest floor, when a bright green snake slid across the the top of my arms and then it stopped, and looked at me. . . . It’s head was less than a foot way from my face, and both of my arms were underneath the animal. . ..I shat myself at that moment. . .as
          as any snake in that region was going to be venomous. . .I refused to move, and after what seemed like a half hour, but was, in fact probably a few seconds,,. . .it slithered away.. . .I had, up until that time, never shat myself before. . . . .

          But that’s another story. . .I survived and I’m here to post loads of silly $hit on this blog. . . . .

          • Sujit Sharma

            great story… total bullshi t, but it kept my attention to the end.

    • Mike S

      I’ve often wondered if these guys have calculators (is there an app for that?) when they’re working something like that. I haven’t seen any mention any where. If they do this manually, they’ve got some kind of grey matter. Even if they do use calcs/apps it’s something else.

  • Fruitbat44

    Good shot.

  • Sermon 7.62

    Bogus!

    To hit a man from 3,450 m a round must hold at least 0.5 moa, and that’s impossible.

    • lookinoutforu

      Its possible, because I’ve done better than that. My best 5 shot group was 0.38 moa.

      • Sermon 7.62

        0.38 moa at 3,450m?

        • lookinoutforu

          100 yards. At 3,450, I prefer a 105 🙂

    • MichaelZWilliamson

      Impossible for you, I’m sure. Some of us have done that at albeit shorter ranges. And that man is a professional.

      • Sermon 7.62

        It is not possible for a rifle to do this, professional or not how is it going to hold 0.5 moa at this range?

    • DwnRange

      A 1/2 MOA @ 3,773 yards is 18.864 inches……….,not impossible.from a rifle that shoots 1/2 MOA. @ 1000 yards as most serious rifles do better than that.

      • Sermon 7.62

        It can shoot 0.5 moa but not after the bullet goes subsonic and slows down to the point where it destabilizes and begins to deviate. I suppose it’s about 2,000m or something like that. After getting there, it should start to drift more and more.

        • DwnRange

          I believe you are under-estimating the extremely high ballistic coefficient bullet that achieves near perfection in flight of this particular 750 gr A-Max bullet – it’s low-drag and uniform point along with it’s “secant” ogive, which raises the ballistic coefficient and
          precisely balances the center of pressure relative to the center of
          gravity allows it to achieve optimal in-flight stability. The A-Max G1 BC of 1.050 is one of the best bullets made (all according to the Hornady information) for long range shooting from the 50 cal platform and these features minimize the transition disruption when passing the sub-sonic barrier.

          I may not shoot a 50 cal, but I do and have shot a custom red-line loaded 77 gr SMK outta a CR6724 to 1K for decades, long before the military’s use of the current MK262 Mod 1 round. This load goes sub-sonic around 950 yards but yet is still capable of sub MOA at the 1000 yard mark – pretty good for a pop gun rifle pitching a bullet nearly 1/10 it’s weight and something many “F” class and HP shooters thought was dang near impossible until i prove it’s capability in actual “F” class competitions.

          • FarmerB

            Depends on the bullet. The .50 AMAX just isn’t that accurate (like just about everything else in the .50 BMG). It’s a good bullet, but not magic.

          • DwnRange

            I tend to believe it “is” based on the results Canadian snipers are getting with it………

            ps – they are not shooting semi-auto Barretts here, but bolt action McMillian Tac 50s

          • FarmerB

            We have them too 🙂

  • NukeItFromOrbit

    But when you kill your enemy they win according to Trudeau.

  • Avid Fan

    Just curious, anyone figure the energy left at 3450 meters?

  • Mark Horning

    Although this article does not mention it, other reports say that the ammo uses a 750 grain Hornady AMAX bullet.

    • MichaelZWilliamson

      That is Canadian standard, yes.

    • jcitizen

      That is the only match bullet that comes to mind, but then I’ve been away from the market for a while, there may be competitors by now.

  • mazkact

    Not long ago our buddy iksnilol
    was telling us that the .50 BMG round was a poorly designed piece of crap. Has not weighed in yet.

    • jcitizen

      Maybe I can weight in for him – the BMG round IS crap – but the match ammo is a whole other world of tech – or tac if you prefer. If it were me, (never happen), I’d prefer hand loading my own ammo. Little things like where the neck of the cartridge ends in the chamber can make a world of difference. I use a lathe to trim my cases.

      • mazkact

        Well one can say that 7.62×39 is crap and for the most part that would be right. Handloaded right and shot from a well made bolt gun 7.62×39 can be great. 50 BMG machine gun ammo is just that and not precision ammo. Nothing wrong with the design of 50 BMG.

        • jcitizen

          I agree.

      • FarmerB

        So do we.

  • Calavera

    Distant thunder! If you heard the shot, you weren’t the target.

  • hikerguy

    A Canadian special forces sniper and an American made McMillon .50 cal rifle are, evidently, a really good combination.

  • adverse4

    Next time use artillery. Get them all.

  • Tp

    Where still a good hit at that distance, I agree, only a laser targeted missle has the means to make that shot without luck on your side, and yes multiple shots. Every shot would have been affected differently at that range, and one does not know all the variables in 2.2 miles, winds ever changings all the way there. BUT still a great job for his spotter, and himself, you still have to have a hell of a skill set, and great equiptment!

    • MichaelZWilliamson

      I have seen 1500 yard cold bore shots from a .50 hit the silhouette.

  • Richard Chelvan

    The British Commonwealth (an expression you don’t hear anymore) have an excellent reputation for long range shooting prowess! Gadgets will only take you so far! Then you have to aim off!

  • Sujit Sharma

    At that distance its luck…the sniper likely hit someone else. Someone who sat still for 10 seconds..I’m thinking a pregnant woman or an old man. But hey, for the terrorists invading Iraq, a kill is a kill and gets them into the record books.

    • MichaelZWilliamson

      No, he hit what he was aiming at. He’s just better than you, at everything.

      As far as ISIS, when the Turks, Kurds, Persians, Arabs, Israelis, Russians, Euros and Americans all agree you’re scum, you actually are scum.

      I guess that makes you a scumsucker.

  • Hank Seiter

    Why do we have to objectify and demonize Muslim jihadi’s in such a dehumanizing manner? Even though Muslim/Islam isn’t a race it’s still racist … NOT! (barking bleeding-heart moonbat mode/off)
    Nice hit, sir, and job well done soldier.

    With my Ruger Precision Rifle in .308 I find 800 meter shots extremely challenging. I know I’m talking apples and oranges, but given the incredible amount of variables involved, even with the advantage of using a ballistics computer, a 2.2 mile shot is utterly mind-boggling. Is there any information on whether this was a one-shot-one-kill scenario or was it a short string of shots walked into the target?

    BTW, if there was a muzzle report to be heard at that distance, it would have followed along behind the bullet by about ten seconds. Do we know if the Canadian soldier was using a suppressor?
    In any case, there’s no way the bad guys could possibly know where the shot originated unless they were to extrapolate the through-and-through with where the bullet impacted the terrain behind him. Even then they would have never thought the shot originated 2.2 miles away … until they read the news accounts! Heh!

  • Mark Are Reynolds Ⓥ

    WOW! Another murder of someone who is defending his country from invaders! The Canadians should be PROUD and make a movie about the guy! Don’t forget guys…the Iraqi security forces are nothing but a paid mercenary arm of the invading armies that are in Iraq. Am I the only one who is bright enough to figure this out? Gee, imagine it this way..CHINA has invaded the USA and we “insurgents” are defending ourselves from the Chinese. Meanwhile the existing government has gone to crap and went and hid in bunkers. So the Chinese help the government get a USA security force together to help them keep control of the USA. Meanwhile us “insurgents” are attacking a USA security force and a Chinese sniper shoots one of us from ________ fill in the blank distance and is praised as a HERO! WOW! What a surprise, an invading Canadian is a hero for killing someone defending their country from invaders.

    • MichaelZWilliamson

      Before we continue this discussion, I need to see your birth certificate. Please hold it up outside and the black helicopter will photograph it while spraying autism virus.

    • MichaelZWilliamson

      As far as ISIS, when the Turks, Kurds, Persians, Arabs, Israelis, Russians, Euros and Americans all agree you’re scum, you actually are scum.

      And you’re supporting scum apparently.

    • Tim

      ISIS = Evil Coward . You are worse than ISIS .

    • DwnRange

      Actually in this instance the Iraqi Security force is the equivalent of State Nation Guard troops here in the US – the Daesh (ISIL/ISIS, likely funded by the US – although this was not Syria so who can say) are the bad guys here.

      Perhaps you should put the crack pipe down and read a little better…….

    • Andrea Goldstein

      Mark, you’re either a troll or bat-sh!t crazy. Either way, you’re scum.

    • Sujit Sharma

      You spoke the complete truth, I’m not surprised you’re being attacked by the brain washed moro ns here.

  • albaby2

    Having a target that will stand still for 10 seconds or knowing where he will be 10 seconds after the trigger is pulled is a big help. No, I don’t mean laying on the ground dead.

  • Mitch Rapp

    I’m a long range shooter. It’s likely he had a spotter telling him where his missed rounds were hitting. Using a thing we call “Kentucky Windage” he ‘walked’ the rounds in while the bad guys were standing there, looking around like idiots trying to figure out where the shots were coming from…not believing they were any real danger, until one round hit the target. Never-the-less, it was a great shot for the sniper. Kudos to the Canadians!

  • jcitizen

    McMillan was the first company to bring a fully developed rifle chambered for 50 BMG into my area. Looks like they still got what it takes!

  • MichaelZWilliamson

    The bullet had 10 seconds to apologize en route.

  • cwolf

    youtubeDOTcom/watch?v=bzwY6jIwr2o

    Although all commentators don’t have actual data, so there can be lots of educated guessing (wind, temp, humidity, elevation, round used, Coriolis, etc.).

    “Likely the round used was the Mark 211 Model 0 Raufoss, which is a 671-gr. armor piercing round that has a tungsten-carbide penetrator. ”

    Still, fortune favors the prepared.

    • DwnRange

      Does not apply here as round used was listed as 750grn A-Max.

  • Tp

    I believe it, 1500 yards is faily easy for well trained people. I was only saying there is too many uncontrolable variables, that distance in a hot dessest, the wind dirrections probably changed about 20 times, and the next shot is diff. Put a guy in a vaccum 3000 yard range, he hits it, great shooting, put a guy in the dessert with too many uncontrollable variables, good shot + luck.

    • Sujit Sharma

      “hot dessert” like a brownie?

  • Eric B.

    A shot of that distance would need something like the Kestrel/Applied Ballistics 5700 (combined weather meter and ballistics calculator) and a powerful laser rangefinder to accomplish the proper firing solution for such an extreme range shot. Corolis effect, spin drift, bullet BC, muzzle velocity, FFP altitude density, etc. would have to all be calculated into the firing solution.

    My personal 10 x 42 binocular laser rangefinder only ranges to 1,700 meters. A much more expensive LRF would be needed for the shot at 2 miles, not to mention a ballistic calculator for that extended distance.

  • Eric B.

    For that shot I would want a 5 – 30x scope with 100 MOA vertical adjustment mounted in 20 MOA rings on a 30 MOA Picatinny rail and using a Horus H59 reticle. Likely a Hensoldt or S&B PM II scope would be best.

    Even then at that distance, with my vertical turret dialed all the way up, a shooter would likely have to use the bottom reticle cross hatch held 6 ft. above the target. But that’s great shooting even for the best snipers. Perhaps you could call it “light artillery”.