New Ear Pro: Walker’s Silencer Ear Buds

Ear Pro

I know a lot of people that really like the hearing protection provided by Walker’s. If you like in ear protection, the company just announced a new product that might interest you.

Called the Silencer Ear Buds, these new in ear plugs use a digital signal processor for sound compression to diminish the harmful effects of loud noises like gunfire. In my experience, compression does a significantly better job at maintaining a natural ability to hear conversations while shooting than other systems that simply cut out the amplification circuit. I’d describe it as being more of an analog feel than a digital feel.

The Silencer Ear Buds are completely independent of each other: there are no straps, wires or other attachments to require a link the left and right. This means less chance of them becoming ensnared on some bit of gear. However, there is a lanyard that can be attached to help keep the buds together. How you choose to run them is up to you. Each bud has an omnidirectional mic and its own volume control.

Walker’s includes three sizes of contoured fins and foam with each set of ear buds. This allows the shooter to best fit the plugs to his or her own ear size.

According to the company, a set of #10 batteries will power the ear buds for 80 hours. For most folks, that will cover a lot of range time or time sitting in a tree stand.

The suggested retail price on these is $199. A carrying case is included with the Silencer Ear Buds. An official NRR (noise reduction rating) has not yet been provided. While I have no way of knowing what the NRR will be, checking the company’s other ear bud style hearing protection, the Razor X, I see that it has a NRR of 31 dB.



Richard Johnson

An advocate of gun proliferation zones, Richard is a long time shooter, former cop and internet entrepreneur. Among the many places he calls home is http://www.gunsholstersandgear.com/.


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  • Blake

    I really need to find a good pair of these in-ear active ear buds that’s up for a reasonable price. I can’t stand the way eye pro greatly diminishes the effectiveness of traditional earmuffs, and using dumb earplugs with a set of active muffs is just stupid.

    • RocketScientist

      Really? Thats what I do most of the time and it works great for me. I use the cheap orange foamies in the ear canal, covered with a set of active over-the-ear muffs. The muffs’ volume allows you to amplify sounds to louder than ambient level. so I turn it up so that its a little bit louder than actual. This makes me able to clearly follow conversation, range commands, etc, but the active electronics cut out the loud noises, giving me double protection for the loud stuff (foamies plus muffs). For range use it works great; no headaches, no problem communicating, comfortable. Different strokes for different folks I guess.

      • lucusloc

        A lot of us have face geometry that precludes using muffs with rifles. I, for example, cannot use any muffs while shooting rifles, because my ears are low enough to prevent a cheek weld when using them. Over ears or headphone style earpro are OK, but take a lot of attention to make sure they stay in right. In ear earpro was always desirable, but electro version used to run 400$ or more per set, with the best examples running $500 or so each. We have needed an affordable version for a long time. At $200 a set this is getting there, is is within the realm of possibility for many hobby shooters. I would like to see a review to find out how well they stack up to the more expensive models, and I definitely want them to get an official rating, but these are probable going on my “very soon” list.

        • RocketScientist

          Ahhh, okay, hadnlt considered the whole stock-muff interference thing. Mine are the dark-green low profile Howard Leight ones, and don’t pose an issue on my head, guess I got lucky. I do really like the idea of these in-ear active plugs though, for situations where the fulls doubled-up effect isn’t needed, etc. Depending on NRR of course.

          • lucusloc

            If we can get the HPA to pass I really look forward to doubling up being a thing of the past.

      • lucusloc

        A lot of us have face geometry that precludes using muffs with rifles. I, for example, cannot use any muffs while shooting rifles, because my ears are low enough to prevent a cheek weld when using them. Over ears or headphone style earpro are OK, but take a lot of attention to make sure they stay in right. In ear earpro was always desirable, but electro version used to run 400$ or more per set, with the best examples running $500 or so each. We have needed an affordable version for a long time. At $200 a set this is getting there, is is within the realm of possibility for many hobby shooters. I would like to see a review to find out how well they stack up to the more expensive models, and I definitely want them to get an official rating, but these are probable going on my “very soon” list.

      • Blake

        It’s just so… pointless. If I’m already wearing muffs I shouldn’t have to also wear another type of ear pro.

        • RocketScientist

          Ohhh, i gotcha, its doubling up period that bothers ya. For me, I double-up if at all possible, even if they’re both “dumb” protection (no electronics). Between my hobbies and my career, I know I’m pretty much guaranteed to have hearing issues earlier in life than I’d like to, and seeing how much thats effected my grandfather (worked under the “big guns” on a battleship for a number of years), I do whatever I can to reduce the damage done. I get some folks teasing me about it every now and then, but I’m okay with that.

          • Blake

            I do it too when I am shooting rifles, but it’s just so frustrating to have to do so. If I’m paying good money for a piece of tech I expect it to work.

        • Ebby123

          Exactly. Effective, but far from optimal. I have to wear it this way at work and it drives me nuts. Technology needs to advance in this area.

          There’s absolutely no reason in 2017 we can’t protect our hearing from damaging noises while still being able to talk normally – AND not put on half a space suit to make it happen.

    • Flounder

      Dude… This is the budget options… Most are 400ish. I would love for them to be cheaper. But i doubt it will happen for a while.

      • Blake

        Yeah I know, but there aren’t any reports from the masses yet on if these are actually effective.

        • Flounder

          I have heard just the opposite. Everyone who gets to use a pair or owns a pair loves them. But they might be just trying to justify the expense.

          No one i trustnis saying they are miacles either. It is more like a good pair of over ear electronic ear pro.

  • USMC03Vet

    These need a key fob alarm so you can find them after range use.

    • Independent George

      But how will you hear the alarm after losing your hearing because you couldn’t find your ear pro?

      “Mawwwp. Mawwwp. Mawwwp.”

      • mazkact

        Archer ” Damn you tinnitus”.

    • DanGoodShot

      That is a very good point. I lose everything and I would certainly lose these! A key fob is definitely in order.

  • Michael R. Zupcak

    I want something like this that cancels noise but also connects to my phone so I can listen to music or talk radio while running a Toro Pro-Force blower that sounds (and looks, frankly) like a jet engine.

    • I wear my regular MP3 player earbuds underneath passive ear muffs when mowing the lawn. Works great.

      • (Actually, they aren;t passive. My “lawnmowing muffs are just an old pair of Peltor 6S that is just too much of a PITA to swap batteries in when I’ve got better muffs available…)

  • Fritz609

    Still waiting for in-ear protection for INDOOR use