Get a free clipazine with a Marlin rifle? Come on Marlin, you know better. I am disappointed.

Reddit user u/MiamiZeus posted a picture of a hang tag that was attached to a Marlin rifle in a Wal-Mart that is advertising a free 7-shot clip with the purchase of the rifle. With the argument of clip vs. magazine, manufacturers using the wrong term isn’t helping the right word prevail. I guess you could use the argument of knowing what the customer identifies with given the rifle is on sale at Wal-Mart, that isn’t exactly the preferred gun store of most gun people in my experience.

So does it annoy me a bit? Just a bit. I would prefer to see companies like Marlin putting forth the effort to educate the customer base instead of just rolling with what the public calls them even though it is incorrect.

There is a bit of humor in it though, I can’t be that mad. I wonder how many people at Marlin saw the hang tag and signed off on the vernacular without a second thought. It makes me wonder if they even considered that gun guys like myself would point and laugh a bit instead of glancing at it and thinking, “not a bad deal, maybe I’ll get that one.”



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  • Jared Vynn

    If I worked at that Walmart I’d have to clip that tag off.

    • Don Ward

      “Clip that tag off”.

      Hehe. It’s a homonym.

      • Jammy

        That’s ” pop that tag”…..

  • Some Rabbit

    Well, the graphic arts guy (who isn’t a gun guy) already had the circle graphic mapped out and the word ‘magazine’ just wouldn’t fit and ‘magazine’ and ‘Marlin’ looked awkward and nobody from marketing bothered to check the artwork before it went to the printer and… well, mistakes were made.

    • SlothLovesChunk

      “Mag” is a perfectly acceptable truncated form of “magazine.” Don’t make excuses for them.

      • Jared Vynn

        Put what it’s a 22 Magnum magazine, than you would have 22 Mag Mag. Or what if it’s a magnesium alloy? You’d have 22 Mag Mag Mag than.

        • Dr. Longfellow Buchenrad

          What if someone wrote a monthly publication about it?

  • lucusloc

    *Sigh* guess I have to boycott Marlin now. . .

    • Jared Vynn

      It’s Remington anyways, Rusty and poor QC says by the Ruger or Savage instead.

      • lucusloc

        Well, yeah, but how are we going to let them know that were just not buying their stuff due to poor quality without a boycott? Shouldn’t there be a difference between “I’m not buying your stuff cause it’s junk.” and “I’m not buying your stuff cause I don’t want your stupid to rub off on me.”? I suppose its all the same in the end, but I want to send a message damnit.

      • tiger

        Oh, please…. Like Ruger or Savage are some great standard of greatness.

        • Jared Vynn

          For the cost they are way above Remington.

        • ostiariusalpha

          If you can make a levergun better than the Savage M99 or a SxS shottie better than the Fox Model B, then you have achieved greatness.

          • tiger

            The Folks at Browning Might suggest A product or two….

          • ostiariusalpha

            It’s tough to beat a good Browning gun, but the M99 was craftsmanship bordering on art and the Model B was excellence within the reach of the working man’s wallet.

        • iksnilol

          Savage is hella good.

          • Dougscamo

            Hella yes….

  • Don Ward

    This is the lowest common denominator of Internet gun guys trying to sound knowledgeable by wringing their hands about the appropriate use of the slang term “clip”.

    We all know it’s a magazine or a “mag”. We know what “clips” are. When it comes down to slang usage, “clip” is interchangeable with magazine even though it is not technically correct. Just like when someone says bullets, we know he means cartridges or rounds.

    If you try to argue with this statement, you are a pedantic prat and it makes you sound like the annoying kid in class who sits up in the front row who starts out every sentence with the phrase, “Well actually”.

    We get it. It got annoying 10 years ago.

    This is almost as bad as people whanking themselves raw over slide stops/slide release or who look at the staged photographs in old gun magazines and whine because folks’ fingers are on the trigger.

    • Steve

      I work for a local FFL. Have for 7+ years. When someone asks for a “clip,” I walk them over to the Clipdraw section or where we sell sling clip hardware (HK style, Mash hooks, etc.)

      Passive-aggressive ftw.

      • Don Ward
        • Major Tom

          If Clippy’s marksmanship is anything like his “help”, I have nothing to fear from him.

          • .45

            As a little kid, I liked the robot better, though I don’t remember using him for much of anything, just thought he was cool.

      • jerry young

        Shouldn’t the first thing you do be to ask a clip for what instead of assuming? then you could point them in the proper direction.

      • PaulWVa

        Knowing that your customer is probably looking for a mag for his gun and sending them to something else makes you a putz.. Please post where you work….so I can avoid your self righteous a$$.

      • Lyman Hall

        My grandmother was the queen of passive agressive. You’re not even a pup.
        BTW – she died in the nursing home. THAT’S what PA gets you.

      • Matt Taylor

        Your shop sells Clipdraw? ‘Nuff said. 😉

    • Madison J Coleman

      Well said Don Ward. Wouldn’t be nice if the people of the gun could just get out of their own way and not get bogged down in petty and pointless crap like this. I swear we are living in the era of the d-bag.

      • Steve again

        It’s a highly technical industry, those who care to be correct call them “magazines.”

        • tiger

          It can get very petty. Like the English major police, chasing bad comma use.

          • clampdown

            Not all of us are grammar nazis. Two courses cured me of any inkling of that, History of the English Language and Structure of Modern English. Our language is fluid and flexible through time. Clip is the accepted word right now, for better or worse. Time will tell how this linguistic struggle ends.

          • Twilight sparkle

            Clip was actually used along side the term magazine during the 1911 trials between the savage and the colt design, it wasn’t till awhile after the 1911s adoption that the term magazine was made standard. Even in a 1940 publication of the 1911 field manual the term clip still pops up one time.

        • Ebby123

          No, it really isn’t. The enthusiast community wants to be highly technical… and is usually wrong 35% of the time.

          This is no different than the drag racing enthusiast community… lots of enthusiasm, not so much factual information.

    • John

      Well I must disagree, my friend spent two hours trying to load a 10 round clip into the magazine well of his new AR and after using a hammer and some duct tape, he got it to work. It only fires one round and then you have to hit the bottom of the clip with the small hammer but the clip works so HA!

      I got the hammer from Harbor Freight after magazining a coupon from the newspaper.

    • lucusloc

      I have used this example before, but let me illustrate:

      A firearms noob walks into a store and asks for “clips” for his SKS. The store owner goes and gets him some of these:
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/606440bf5ff230ddca88258f6eb07c4ee49b844c5787a3287193d8ea64afd586.jpg

      The noob says “that is not what I need.” and the gun store owner gets annoyed. He then goes to get one of these:
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/b191cd9952a95f2b779f1f7d126527858fc2a08dffe9da278ca9ca869eaa799f.jpg

      See why the common vernacular might be wrong on this one?

      • Don Ward

        OK. And if I go down to the South – so I’m told – if I order a “coke” it can mean any number of soft drink products because of their vernacular.
        Or if I’m in Great Britain and it is raining, I should go out wearing a rubber.
        There are technical terms. And there is slang. It is the wonderful feature of the English language and the human experience in general where words can mean many different – or the same – things.
        Per your example, the firearm noob walks into the gun store and asks for a “clip” for his SKS. When the clerk brings back a stripper clip, that means riots then break out into the streets, citizens renounce their country and their various gods, men start lying with cattle and sheep start lying with women, and all of human society breaks down as a result.
        Because that is how certain gun guys react when someone uses the term “clip” incorrectly.

        • lucusloc

          No, it means they should be politely corrected. Where people get annoyed is when it is rightly pointed out that this “slang” is not clear in the context and should therefor be avoided but are then told to just “get over it” because “it does not matter”. This is not a situation where people know that “coke” is soda, and that to specify a specific type of “coke” you need to ask for “cokecola”. Those of us not in the know may find this distinction annoying, but there is still a way to be precise in communication. This is not true for “clip” vs. “mag”. There is no other way to specify “mag” vs “clip” unless you start doubling up (“did you mean clip clip, or mag clip?”). It is not a trivial distinction like your other examples.

          • Don Ward

            However in this case, Marlin is correct in that they’ve been using the term “clip magazine” for their patented device since at least the 1930s.

          • lucusloc

            The term marlin uses is “clip-in magazine” and I would argue that shortening this to “clip” is against industry practice, as it cause the exact same confusion. Just because one manufacturer goes off the reservation does not mean that it is an accepted practice.

        • tiger

          I miss the old internet world. Before the masses joined.

          • BillyOblivion

            Welcome to the eternal September.

          • tiger

            It really was as very different Net in say, 1992. Pre Google, Pre yahoo, People on AOL, 56k dialup modems, Desktops for all. Floppy drives.Netscape as a browser. The hum of dot matrix printers. Ah, the frontier days of the cyber Old West….

          • iksnilol

            All that sounds horrible.

          • Lyman Hall

            56k modem? Try 14.4.

          • tiger

            It was a very different & more polite time. Now it is everybody in the cheap seats at a Eagles games on board.

          • jamezb

            RS232C handset cradle.

          • RocketScientist

            Heh. Beat me to it. Knowing that term used to make me feel “cool” and like I was an insider who had been there before the idiots arrived. Now it just makes me feel old 🙁

          • BillyOblivion

            I was around when AOL had it’s moment
            of doubt and fame…

        • jamezb

          As a southerner, I can attest the “coke” thing is a myth.
          Do northerners really call soft drinks ‘pop”?

          • jamezb

            Oh, and Brits wear a “mac” (Macintosh raincoat) in the rain. – Rubbers are slip over rubber booties. We won’t go into what they call cigarettes.

          • Don Ward

            I live in the Washington state and I use “soft drinks” and “soda”. But it’s not anything that is too important an issue.

      • .45

        And then, after the gun newb comes back all upset his new “clip” doesn’t work, the gun store guy finds out this idiot just bought a Wasr10 and only thinks he has an SKS…

    • supergun

      I have been reading a lot in the news about this conversation. Mostly from liberals using commode paper instead of toilet tissue.

  • MissileMech

    Know your audience?

  • JASON B

    I can’t believe no one has mentioned the real problem with this marketing BS. The rifle already comes with a magazine, it is NOT a free mag. I assure you that you are paying for it in the cost of the rifle. It was going to come with NO magazine until this great deal? Like that is an option. That pisses me off far more than the poor word choice.

    • Don Ward

      I wonder if the advertising means “Comes with an additional 7-shot clip”.

    • Twilight sparkle

      Actually it just comes with two now instead of one.

  • Vizzini

    Yawn.

  • Swarf

    They’ve been using “clip” in their brochures for many years.

    I’ve used screenshots of that as evidence that if the manufacturers don’t care all that much, then maybe we shouldn’t get all worked up about it either.

    There are far bigger issues to care about, but yes, I too can be a pedant. I get it.

    • lucusloc

      It’s not just pedantry, it is clear communication. In this case what do we call actual clips

      if we use the word “clip” to main “mag”? An entire class of tools just got way more confusing to talk about, because now when someone say “clip” it may not be clear from the context if they mean a device with a spring that feeds a gun, or a device without a spring that feeds a device with a spring that feeds the gun.

      And since “pedantic” means “excessive concern with minor details and rules” I do not think this is pedantic at all, it is trying to preserve clear communication.

      I have used this example before, but let me illustrate:

      A firearms noob walks into a store and asks for “clips” for his SKS. The store owner goes and gets him some of these:

      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/606440bf5ff230ddca88258f6eb07c4ee49b844c5787a3287193d8ea64afd586.jpg

      The noob says “that is not what I need.” and the gun store owner gets annoyed. He then goes to get one of these:
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/b191cd9952a95f2b779f1f7d126527858fc2a08dffe9da278ca9ca869eaa799f.jpg

      See why the common vernacular might be wrong on this one?

      • Swarf

        I know, I know. And, like I said, I get it. Your point is taken and well made.

        For me, I get annoyed at the near glee with which certain folks will pounce on some poor kid for juxtaposing the terms. Or a hundred other things gun nerds get so self righteously haughty about, sniping at their own like sarcastic hyenas.

        • lucusloc

          I always try to be polite about it, and I do not have this problem only in the “gun culture”. The dumbing down of language is everywhere, and it is infuriating no matter where it is found. I may not expect everyone to know the difference between a switch, a router and a modem, but you damn well better not get pissy at me when you point me in the wrong direction and I spend 15 min of billable time tracing the issue back to the source, even if you “knew” that was the box that was having problems.

          When I issue a polite correction, as the more knowledgeable person in the conversation, I expect deference, not push-back. Even if you are not going to use that information ever again, at least make the effort to get it right for this conversation. That is just the polite thing to do (and politeness is another largely absent quality in our greater American culture) And if you are trying to enter the hobby? You better damn well pay attention, because many hobbies are highly technical with their terminology. Getting it wrong on purpose will just make the more senior practitioners annoyed with you, and less likely off help in the future. This is not just a “gun culture” problem, it is true of pretty much any technical hobby.

          • Don Ward

            I agree that the correct way is to be polite. And quite obviously you and I both know the correct terminology.
            I’ll disagree in that interchanging magazine/mags for clips in a conversation creates any sort of meaningful confusion or detriment other than annoying someone who knows what a magazine is.
            That’s because the majority of firearms used today don’t use clips. Even the Marlin pictured above. If I say I want a 7-round clip for it, you jolly well know I mean a 7-round magazine.
            And even weapons that do use clips, even that is terminology is nuanced. If I have an M1 Garand, I’d go to the store asking for an EN BLOC clip. If I have a 1903 Springfield or Enfield/SMLE or Kar98 or SKS per your example I’d ask for a STRIPPER clip. That is the common usage of the language and how we use it today.
            How we got into the situation I believe is because when we had tens of millions of servicemen learning to fire M1 Garands during WW2, Korea and well into the 1960s, a correct sentence would read “I’m out of ammo, toss me a clip”. This phraseology – IMHO – would have been used if one was firing a magazine fed M1 Carbine. Furthermore, when the M14 and M16 were first adopted, GIs were still learning on M1 Garands during basic, or even if they weren’t they were being taught by NCOs who did and so using the short and succinct slang term “clip” to mean the more cumbersome sounding “magazine” or even “mag” was still en vogue well into the 1970s and 1980s when Hollywood began picking up the slang for use in action movies for lines delivered semi-automatic and machine gun wielding heroes.

            Now here is where I get controversial.

            From what I’ve seen and remember, most of the gun community was perfectly fine interchanging clip for magazine until the 1990s. And that is when the popularity of rap music featuring the term “clip” coupled by gang violence perpetrated by criminals using AK-47s and semi-automatic handguns became endemic. We had rap songs like “Regulate” performed by Warren G in 1994 has the line “Sixteen in the clip and one in the hole, Nate Dogg is about to make some bodies turn cold”.
            It is at this point, with the rap/gang culture appropriating the term clip and using it to mean magazine that gun writers began frantically clutching their pearls, trying to correct the terminology.

            Heck, if I had a byline here at TFB and I wanted to get back into the writing business again (I’m a former newspaper reporter) THAT would be a subject of one of my stories.

            In short, I basically agree with you. It’s just that I don’t get as upset over the terminology.

          • ostiariusalpha

            En blocs are a strange case. I call them clips without batting an eye, as everyone else does, but when inserted into its firearm, they actually form part of the magazine. This is in contrast to stripper clips that are totally separate components.

          • Don Ward

            I call them “en bloc clips” because “en bloc” is fun to say and it is a cheap way to make yourself look smart in front of folks that don’t know a lot about guns.

          • ostiariusalpha

            They’re just all around fun. I wish more modern guns used en bloc clips, they are lighter and more disposable than detachable mags.

          • iksnilol

            And cheaper.

          • .45

            That is because so called stripper clips are actually chargers. Clips do in fact stay in the gun, while chargers are discarded.

          • ostiariusalpha

            The en bloc clip was invented by Ferdinand Mannlicher, and he called it Laderahmen, or “charging frame” in English. Both stripper clips and en bloc clips “charge” the magazine.

          • lucusloc

            I disagree, I regularly shoot guns that take both. Even the modern AR-15 takes both, and though I do not use both for that platform, I know people who do. We use proper terminology because not doing so would lead to confusion. It is also a sign of either laziness or ignorance. As someone who participates in quite a few technical fields both professionally and recreationally clear communication is valued. Desktops are not laptops, 2 strokes are not 4 strokes, and mags are not clips. I have not been around long enough to confirm your theory on usage, but for as long as I have been around the old hands have made the distinction. This does not mean everyone, and I can certainly see many in the military picking up incorrect terminology, but even if it is being taught in the military that does not mean it is correct, or even should be a standard. This is a battle worth fighting, because it preserves clear communication that is not possible with the current slang. Its not that I get upset over the use per se, it’s that I get upset over unclear communication in general since I have had it ruin my day on more than one occasion.

          • iksnilol

            AR-15s don’t take clips. Their magazines do though.

          • lucusloc

            Yes, and this is what I was thinking when I wrote it, but the contrarian in me want to point out this new wrinkle: https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/05278ea1cc89132d22f00c2cdf8dfd0359db33840498bfbb2b6090e8c988bd5c.jpg

  • Cal.Bar

    It’s kind of like getting millennials to use proper grammar – a waste of time. At some point the exception supplants the rule and common vernacular overtakes the proper usage.

    • lucusloc

      yes, but in this case common vernacular is a loss of information, not a gain.

  • Sunshine_Shooter

    Ha! As if I needed another reason to hate the ‘Marlin’ head of the Big Green hydra.

  • Disarmed in CA

    Spring-loaded feeding device.

  • Brett baker

    A local shop had one of these. It had a 4 and a 7 shot mag. So that’s probably where free comes from.

    • Jim_Macklin

      A flush magazine and an extended magazine. Makes some sense since it normally can cost $10 for a second magazine.

      Marlin 39A Mountie has a tubular magazine and works 100% with S, L, and LR mixed if you like it. Wish I still the one I had about 60 years ago.

      Sixty years ago they did not have a crossbolt safety. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/9cbdb6d2088ad8351aaf30791c3a6331188e32c7af403db6c15e766b8705d028.jpg

      • iksnilol

        tube mags are awkward to load, especially if suppressed.

        • Jim_Macklin

          The Browning .22 Auto and the Remington version don’t have a problem with a suppressor.
          https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/76fa2f4d14a409627b0a47793bafdf15969679da513a8dfb48b64bca6e24075b.jpg

        • Dougscamo

          Henry is making a 10 shot, tube fed, lever action .22 now that comes pre-threaded for a suppressor….saw one 2 weeks ago and looks pretty sweet….of course at my age, I don’t buy green bananas anymore much less wait 6-8 months for the $200 stamp….

          • iksnilol

            Won’t the tube get in the way when loading it ?

          • Dougscamo

            Nope, they designed it so that it wouldn’t interfere….it’s basically a half tube magazine with a longer barrel….

  • tiger

    Cut Marlin some slack. This is the ad Dept. folk at work.

  • flyingburgers

    Today we learned the author never bought a Marlin or never read the paperwork that comes with it. Seriously, I have a 20 year old Marlin manual and it uses “clip”. They are completely consistent with it and never use “magazine” anywhere. This has been going on for many many years.

    Pic stolen from the nets. Note the “clip” in the small text.
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/6b018966e42a02ca66f8dae0cbb5218adb7a14c1487b86a9c5d5d4a74e77c9e3.jpg

  • Don Ward

    You know what? At this point, I think Patrick R. needs to come out with a mea culpa because Marlin has been using the term “Clip Magazine” for its .22 rifles for decades.

    And while I am certainly not a firearms expert, this terminology dates back to at least the 1930s – if not before – when the Marlin company was making .22 caliber tubular fed magazines and “clip magazines”.

    A simple Google search with the words Marlin Clip Magazine brings up an ebook “Marlin Firearms: A History of the Guns and the Company That Made Them”.

    As one of the above posters mentioned, Marlin has been consistent with its terminology with their patented “clip magazine” design.

    And isn’t it ironic that the pedants trying to correct the “mistake” in the use of the term “clip” are the ones who were wrong all along in this particular case involving Marlin.

  • Jim_Macklin

    Is that a second magazine or does Walmart routinely sell .22 rifle without a magazine? Seems like a “clip joint” scam.

  • Ark

    Related question: Has anyone ever produced a .22lr firearm loaded via stripper clips?

    • Indianasteve

      HC3R mags with clips for Ruger 10-22. Not really a stripper clip’ I guess, but almost.

  • iksnilol

    You do know that Marlin itself officially calls it a clip?

  • jerry young

    In our CCW classes we teach the differences and preach proper terminology but in the real world this is how people speak and I for one don’t really care as long as I understand what you are talking about, so by some one calling a magazine a clip it’s not a life threatening mistake or habit and being honest with yourselves if someone asks you to hand them another clip at the range even though in your all has to be correct grammar Nazi brain you do know what they wanted so what’s the big deal?

  • HenryV

    Forget that. That A17 only costs $434? You lucky American-type persons you. 🙂

  • supergun

    What happened to Wal Mart? At one time they were highly respected in the gun department. Now, it is a joke.

  • Pumpkin King XXIII

    Marlin got goobled up by big green years ago, so no, they don’t know better.

    • Don Ward

      Marlin has been consistently using the term “clip magazine” for their patented device since at least the 1930s as has been shown. Who doesn’t know better?

  • AJ187

    Just because they have been wrong for years doesn’t make them right. Anyone that can’t have the self discipline to call something with the right terminology probably can’t be trusted to shoot with anyway. Though I don’t consider most here shooters….

    • Don Ward

      Seems they have a patented device called a “clip magazine” for their .22 rifles. So they’re supposed to change to assuage the feelings of some keyboard commandos who are not only hot and bothered about the issue but wrong to boot? But hey, “real shooters” and all that.

  • BigJohnny

    Perhaps there wasn’t enough room on display card for the work magazine? Na, just another dumb thing to do. But ha, look at all the jabber about a mistype?

  • darkman

    If I take the magazine out of my Ruger PC9 and put it in my Ruger P89 does it magically become a clip or does it really matter as long as it works. While I understand some people feel the need to be technically correct. Terminology in this case is somewhat irreverent.

  • John Daniels

    Marlin has been doing this for years, and I doubt they’ll change any time soon.

  • PaulWVa

    In the Nanny State, that we all now live in, what’s really funny it’s that anyone would bother to write an article like this ….with photos to back up a lame point. This stuff makes me laugh more than someone’s usage of a common word. One of the biggest problems in our sport today is …too many “experts” with internet access.

    • Clinton Matthews

      haha that just made my day as is so correct.. now where’s my bandolier for my 30′

  • Clinton Matthews

    Buyers market.. I don’t get all the hate on Marlin, they produce a product and if it fits your needs then buy it how ever it’s labelled. I bought a Marlin 22lr 20 years ago, best 22 I ever bought for the price. Sad day when I had too hand it in because of my government legislation and get paid twice what I paid for it.

    • Dougscamo

      Australian, like Tassiebush, I take it?

  • Cameron Bissell

    Cant be mad at Marlin because they aren’t Marlin.

    Are you. Gun guy or a firearm guy?

  • t_reese

    As Col. Potter would have said, HORSE HOCKEY! That all this argument is about. If you and the folks around that you are speaking with understand what you are talking about, that’s all that matters. Clip and Magazine have both been used where folks talk about guns for ages. And anyone that wants to make a big deal about which one is THE correct one to use is just being an a**hat!

  • Mike G

    Let’s leave the language policing to the leftists. This running out and shaming anyone for a misuse of gun language is both tiresome and pedantic. I know it’s the way we like to paint the antigun crowd as ignorant when they say clip or assault rifle, but enough.

    I have been shooting and collecting firearms for over 40 years and have been reading about guns since I was little kid. I have worked both part time and full time in the firearms industry, so I am not a novice. That said, if you go back and read the gun magazines of the past the word clip and magazine were used interchangeably when describing an auto pistol magazine. If you read the popular gun magazines of the 80s they also used the term assault rifles to describe military style semiauto rifles. So I laugh when someone can’t wait to correct someone for saying a magazine is a clip. So what! Like I said, leave the language policing for the left.

  • jamezb

    If you have to differentiate between stripper clips and en-bloc clips because a
    “.30-06 clip” for a 1903 won’t work in an M1 Garand, yet you insist both are “clips”
    …you have established only that the word “clip”, (in reference to guns)
    refers to a cartridge feeding device which in some cases remains in the gun,
    (en bloc) and in other cases does not..(stripper)
    …and in doing so, rendered the entire controversy kinda moot being as a magazine is a cartridge feeding device that remains in the gun. Shall we redact history and declare the en bloc clip a magazine?
    Baloney like this is why non-gun people refer to us as “nuts”… get over it, folks, you’re scaring the straights.