Patriot Gun Polishing takes any gun and polishes the metal to a mirror finish. You can see the shine on the Colt above.

I had traded a USP for a 1911 that just happened to be polished as well.

I ended up selling it as I did not use it much. It does look cool though.

Patriot Gun Polishing does some amazing work. Here is a comparison between a factory polished Ruger Vaquero and their polishing work.

 

Do you like polished guns? Would you rock one?





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  • Dougscamo

    Just what I need! A pistol that I have to handle with white gloves to keep from smudging it…..

    • Vhyrus

      Wait till you holster it. I can hear the puckering already.

      • valorius

        Some guns are just for looking at man. πŸ™‚

        • supergun

          Like Harleys.

          • Gary Kirk

            I hate chrome.. Mine was rode hard, parked in the driveway, and never polished.. But then again, most of it wasn’t “Harley” anymore anyway..

            #doesn’tleakoilanymore

          • iksnilol

            Wasn’t “Harley” any more, you mean it worked?

          • Giolli Joker

            It could lean in turns???

          • supergun

            There are motorcycles, then there are HARLEYS.

          • supergun

            That is funny. My Harley took me many places and miles. It never let me down.

          • supergun

            That is why they make many different models with many different options. We are all not made the same. I loved my chrome Harley. It was rode hard, and always sparkled.

          • Phillip Cooper

            All of which are why I ride Japanese Twins.

        • Blake

          Preferably while remaining safely in the display case at the gun shop (in order to prevent wallet damage)…

          • valorius

            LOL

    • supergun

      And the first one shot in the dark.

  • valorius

    Purdy.

    • supergun

      They make good paint brushes.

      • Gary Kirk

        God I hate that I actually know that..

        • supergun

          Well, that is a deep subject. But if they made the Remingtons as good as the Purdys, then I would buy more Remingtons.

          • Gary Kirk

            Wellll.. If they still made Remingtons as good as REMINGTONS (not the Freedom group crap)!! So would I..

          • supergun

            You right.

      • Dougscamo

        Nice shotguns too….if you add an E in the right place…

        • supergun

          You got me on that one????

          • Giolli Joker

            James Purdey & Sons, British fine shotguns.

          • supergun

            The British do make some fine firearms. But I will still keep my Mossberg. Best shotgun for the money. The 930, that is.

  • Phillip Cooper

    “Get rid of that nickel-plated sissy pistol…..”

    • valorius

      Reminds me of the line, “Only a pimp from a cheap New Orleans whorehouse would carry a pearl handled pistol.”

      • Phillip Cooper

        I assume Patton never heard that…

        • pun&gun

          I think Patton SAID that. His stocks were ivory.

      • Evan

        Awesome line. I wonder if it’s just Hollywood or if he actually said that.

    • supergun

      Keep it, if you engrave it.

      • Snake

        Engravings. They offer no tactical advantage in battle. Still, you’re pretty good.

        • supergun

          My engravings are so pretty, that the thugs don’t even want to messs with me.

        • Matt Taylor

          Engraving actually reduces the weight of the slide and therefore allows for faster action movement.

          Much like adding stickers on the windows of your car adds horsepower.

  • USMC03Vet

    Queens wear gloves and so do those that house safe queens.

  • lostintranslation

    Caution:
    Do not use in direct sunlight without protective glasses πŸ™‚

  • Dr. Longfellow Buchenrad

    The Yankee Marshal sent his slide to Patriot Gun Polishing for his “Pimp Gun” build. Its quite a looker.

  • MrBrassporkchop

    So shiny you can see the dude that took the picture used a phone and is bald.

    • supergun

      Where?

    • Just say’n

      He’s shiny too.

    • Phillip Cooper

      Why do you hate bald men?

      Signed
      -Baldilocks

      • pun&gun

        Do you have a moment to talk about our lord and savior, Colin Mochrie?

  • TheNotoriousIUD

    I bet they could make millions in Mexico.

    • Gary Kirk

      Nah, that’s chrome, and random self stick AutoZone vehicle emblems..

      • ostiariusalpha

        It might have a bead-blasted “Morrissey” stenciled onto the slide also.

    • Calavera

      Every time I see a high polish, nickel plated Colt, this song runs through my head…

    • Phillip Cooper

      Or Iraq.

  • SerArthurDayne

    “See, now I’m thinking, maybe it means you’re the evil man, and I’m the righteous man, and Mr. 9 Millimeter here? He’s the shepherd protecting my righteous ass in the valley of darkness…. But I’m trying, Ringo…. I’m trying real hard to be the shepherd…”

  • Heartbreaker

    Take that gun and blue it. Blueing on a mirror polished surface makes the most beautiful finish you will ever see.

    • valorius

      Amen.

    • I’ve never heard of doing that. Now I have to see it.

    • Pumpkin King XXIII

      That what the colt python royal blue finish was.

      • ostiariusalpha

        The Colt 1911 National Match pistols made from 1933-1942 were also a super high gloss blued finish. They earned their nickname “American Beauty” both for that dazzling luster plus the amazingly smooth fitment and function.

    • El Duderino

      I’ve heard of a newer technique/process that can blue stainless steel. Anyone know how that comes out?

  • LazyReader

    Been there, got in trouble

  • valorius
    • Gary Kirk

      Hopefully that’s holsterwear..

      • valorius

        Flutz and a dremel pad. It looked really nice in person, the picture doesn’t really capture it that well.

        • Gary Kirk

          Wasn’t knocking your job brother.. But most of my firearm polishing is from use.. Was just messing with you..

          • valorius

            My LCP has a lot of that kind of polishing πŸ˜€

    • Bradley

      It’s very difficult to mirror Polish something with lots of surfaces well. When I do tomahawks and knives I can grind or sand to some degree to get a flat surface. Most guns have too many dips and minor pits to simply buff. Sanding everything flat without rounding edges or washing out markings isn’t easy.

    • Marcus D.

      Funny, I didn’t like the matte finish on my Kahr either. I polished the sides, but left the top of the slide as is. but as shiny as I could get it, I still couldn’t get rid of the marks from the layering of the stock from which it was made.

      • Giolli Joker

        “I still couldn’t get rid of the marks from the layering of the stock from which it was made”
        Highly polished laminated or forged steel will eventually show the deformation lines of the material, they’re not marks that can be removed, they are properties of the structure.

        • Nicholas C

          Material Science!

        • Marcus D.

          I am familiar with the effect, as many swords were/are produced with folded steel; however, I was rather surprised to see it in a slide. I had assumed it would be simply billet stock, or a single unfolded forging.

          • Giolli Joker

            Those are lines showing how the material has been plastically deformed, not the layers as in a pattern welded (damascus) sword. The slide of your pistol was not folded, welded and folded again and so on; it was either forged to shape or it comes from a forged/laminated/extruded stock. The shaping performed during those phases aligned impurities and some elements along deformation lines, making them visible. To a trained eye the orientation of these lines allows a pretty accurate guess on the mfg process.

          • Marcus D.

            I am not talking about pattern welding, which is very different than folding. to be descriptive, the slide shows straight line (parallel) striations in apparently equal layers, roughly 1mm thick, suggesting lamination, far more pronounced on one side of the slide than the other. I would think extruded stock would not have equal sized bands but be fairly homogeneous, such as the steel from which my Gus Trim sword was milled.

          • Giolli Joker

            Pattern welding is exactly as the folding process but using 2 or more varieties of steel instead of one; usually a pattern welded bar will have less folding a maybe some twisting to achieve an interesting pattern, but the basis are the same: fold and (forge) weld.
            The striations run along the long side of the slide correct?
            Likely the stock was a bar obtained by drawing, possibly one side (more marked) was closer to the surface of said bar and the other took more machining showing structure closer to the core.
            An industrial sword is probably made from a laminated plate/sheet, that is entirely fine if the lamination direction is along the length of the blade. If the deformation were perpendicular to the length you’d have a lot of nice crack initiation paths that could cause failure (if the sword is actually used).
            EDIT: googled Gus Trim, apparently he indeed starts from bar stock machined at the lathe.

          • Marcus D.

            “Pattern welding” as the term is used in the sword community refers to working up a sword from an iron bloom, hammering individual pieces of the bloom either onto what will become an ingot, or as is more usually seen in Viking blades, simply into a long strip. These blades were typically not folded, and x-rays of recovered blades show all the little pieces that were beaten together to make the finished blades. Damascus blades, by contrast, were made with crucible steel, a technique believed to have originated in south east India or perhaps Sri Lanka. A Damascus blade is drawn out from the ingot, and then folded at least four times (more for knives), a process that hardened the steel. (Too much folding and one ended up with a brittle blade.) Damascus blades differ from Japanese blades in that the latter are a sandwich of an inner core of twice folded (soft) steel surrounded by a hard exterior of steel folded many times. The Damascus blades did not have an inner core.

            I have no idea what kind of steel Angus used (uses?) to make swords, other than that it is a “spring steel” bar stock cnc milled to spec and then heat treated. It has a matte finish. The texture throughout the blade is uniform with no striations or impurity marks, so I assume it came from a modern specialty mill.

  • Disarmed in CA

    I told my wife I was polishing my gun and she made me leave the door open.

    • El Duderino

      “That’s polishing compound, honey.”

  • Edeco

    Nope, melted jolly-rancher look. It would have to be really well milled to start and polished more cleverly to stay sharp and look right to me. This stuff looks like The Yankee Marshall got it.

  • LGonDISQUS

    I’ve thought about doing this myself with an AR.

    Just for poops and giggles.

  • Great_Baldung

    Breathing on that would probably mess with the polish

  • Gary Kirk

    YOU MISSED A SPOT!!

  • Mystick

    Purty!

  • Blake

    …for when you need the opposite of “concealed carry”…

  • pun&gun

    Am I the only one that thinks polished finishes look like some combination of gangsta, third world, and cheaply-made-in-Pakistan?

    • ostiariusalpha

      No, you’re probably not alone, but that you and others think that way isn’t entirely correct though. Polished finishes are traditionally found on very high class weapons, taking many man-hours to accomplish correctly, which is the entire reason that street gangstas and third worlders try to ape it; only valuable stuff gets faked, nobody’s counterfeiting the Venezuelan bolΓ­var. The usual method is using cheap electroplating that applies relatively thick layers that hide the lack of metal polish underneath, but are much less durable than what would be acceptable for industrial standards. Gold, silver, and nickel can all be applied using this method without much difference in outward appearance from better applications, though a trained eye can spot it easily enough. Of course, any gun can be polished and buffed, whether cheap or not, if someone takes the time to do it. And even an expensive, correctly crafted gloss finish can look more than a little tacky depending on the design. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/f6c25631abdbb0716fa4e64716c2008dbbde29a68559c71cf9bd17609141ca06.jpg

      • pun&gun

        I’m going to hazard a guess and suggest that hand-mirror-polish started to look cheap due to first-world industrialization, such that only poorer places with cheap labor could justify that much time investment.

        • ostiariusalpha

          Even there it’s largely a working-class point of view, since most lower middle-class people are never going to possess a nickel finish Colt Python, much less a coin finish Holland & Holland double gun. Far more likely is running across a nickel plated Saturday night special or gold plated Hi-Point, which distorts the perception of what kind of guns have glossy finishes.

      • iksnilol

        Did that eagle snap its neck?

        • ostiariusalpha

          It’s even more hilarious if you turn the cylinder and make her head upside-down, but then again, it isn’t a shooting gun.